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Gurteen Knowledge-Log (2002 - 2011)

 




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Welcome to the Gurteen Knowledge Weblog archive for years 2002 - 2011 inclusive.

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Friday 23 December 2011

10:20 GMTPermanent link to #Introduction to the January 2012 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the January 2012 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

Some thoughts for the New Year:

We have a greater capacity to change the world today than the kings and presidents of just 50 years ago. Whether you're a programming prodigy or the office manager holding it all together, technology empowers small groups of passionate people with an astonishing degree of leverage to make the world a better place. Yet I fear that our industry is squandering its opportunity and its talent. In companies large and small, great minds are devoting their lives to endeavors that, even if wildly successful, fail to do great things.


Life is short, youth is finite, and opportunities endless. Have you found the intersection of your passion and the potential for world-shaping positive impact? If you don't have a great idea of your own, there are plenty of great teams that need you - unknown startups and established teams in giant companies alike.

Don't lose the fire you started with. If you're going to devote the best years of your life to your work, have enough love for yourself and the world around you to work on something that matters to you deeply. Something that's beating out of your chest and compels you to throw yourself at it completely. No one knows whether you and your teammates will realize your audacious visions, but in order to do great things, we must attempt great things.


Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of other's opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They some how already know what you truly want. Everything else is secondary.


Imagine a world where we all "did great things".
10:20 GMTPermanent link to #Introduction to the February 2012 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the February 2012 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

After almost 10 years of running my Knowledge Cafes it is so good to find other people who are questioning the lecture format of education and learning. Flip Teaching seems to be gathering apace and many people who have adopted this approach for years are coming out of the woodwork.

This recent article Dont Lecture Me: Rethinking How College Students Learn about Harvard's professor Eric Mazur talks about the benefits of practicing peer instruction in class, rather than the traditional lecture is just one example.

Some quotes from the article:
Research conducted over the past few decades shows it's impossible for students to take in and process all the information presented during a typical lecture, and yet this is one of the primary ways college students are taught, particularly in introductory courses.

Cognitive scientists determined that people's short-term memory is very limited - it can only process so much at once. A lot of the information presented in a typical lecture comes at students too fast and is quickly forgotten.

So for reasons he can't remember, Mazur told the students to discuss the question with each other. "And something happened in my classroom which I had never seen before," he says. "The entire classroom erupted in chaos. They were dying to explain it to one another and to talk about it." Mazur says after just a few minutes of talking to each other, most of the students seemed to have a much better understanding of the concept he'd been trying to teach.


Watch this space. This is just the beginning.
,
10:20 GMTPermanent link to #Introduction to the February 2012 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the February 2012 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

After almost 10 years of running my Knowledge Cafes it is so good to find other people who are questioning the lecture format of education and learning. Flip Teaching seems to be gathering apace and many people who have adopted this approach for years are coming out of the woodwork.

This recent article Dont Lecture Me: Rethinking How College Students Learn about Harvard's professor Eric Mazur talks about the benefits of practicing peer instruction in class, rather than the traditional lecture is just one example.

Some quotes from the article:
Research conducted over the past few decades shows it's impossible for students to take in and process all the information presented during a typical lecture, and yet this is one of the primary ways college students are taught, particularly in introductory courses.

Cognitive scientists determined that people's short-term memory is very limited - it can only process so much at once. A lot of the information presented in a typical lecture comes at students too fast and is quickly forgotten.

So for reasons he can't remember, Mazur told the students to discuss the question with each other. "And something happened in my classroom which I had never seen before," he says. "The entire classroom erupted in chaos. They were dying to explain it to one another and to talk about it." Mazur says after just a few minutes of talking to each other, most of the students seemed to have a much better understanding of the concept he'd been trying to teach.


Watch this space. This is just the beginning.

Sunday 18 December 2011

12:26 GMTPermanent link to #Changing the world through our children in a generation# Changing the world through our children in a generation - Comments (0)

Kiran Bir Sethi shows how her groundbreaking Riverside School in India teaches kids life's most valuable lesson: "I can." Watch her students take local issues into their own hands, lead other young people, even educate their parents.



I've put this YouTube playlist together of several of Kiran's talks on my YouTube Channel.

I love this woman and what she is doing - watch some of the kids stories - I've got a feeling that if we could tap into the passion of all the world's children we could transform the world in a single generation!

And if you enjoy the videos and wish to learn more take a look at the Design for Change Movement she has created.

This is one of the most exciting, moving ideas I have across in a long time.
,
12:26 GMTPermanent link to #Changing the world through our children in a generation# Changing the world through our children in a generation - Comments (0)

Kiran Bir Sethi shows how her groundbreaking Riverside School in India teaches kids life's most valuable lesson: "I can." Watch her students take local issues into their own hands, lead other young people, even educate their parents.



I've put this YouTube playlist together of several of Kiran's talks on my YouTube Channel.

I love this woman and what she is doing - watch some of the kids stories - I've got a feeling that if we could tap into the passion of all the world's children we could transform the world in a single generation!

And if you enjoy the videos and wish to learn more take a look at the Design for Change Movement she has created.

This is one of the most exciting, moving ideas I have across in a long time.
,
12:26 GMTPermanent link to #Changing the world through our children in a generation# Changing the world through our children in a generation - Comments (0)

Kiran Bir Sethi shows how her groundbreaking Riverside School in India teaches kids life's most valuable lesson: "I can." Watch her students take local issues into their own hands, lead other young people, even educate their parents.



I've put this YouTube playlist together of several of Kiran's talks on my YouTube Channel.

I love this woman and what she is doing - watch some of the kids stories - I've got a feeling that if we could tap into the passion of all the world's children we could transform the world in a single generation!

And if you enjoy the videos and wish to learn more take a look at the Design for Change Movement she has created.

This is one of the most exciting, moving ideas I have across in a long time.
,
12:26 GMTPermanent link to #Changing the world through our children in a generation# Changing the world through our children in a generation - Comments (0)

Kiran Bir Sethi shows how her groundbreaking Riverside School in India teaches kids life's most valuable lesson: "I can." Watch her students take local issues into their own hands, lead other young people, even educate their parents.



I've put this YouTube playlist together of several of Kiran's talks on my YouTube Channel.

I love this woman and what she is doing - watch some of the kids stories - I've got a feeling that if we could tap into the passion of all the world's children we could transform the world in a single generation!

And if you enjoy the videos and wish to learn more take a look at the Design for Change Movement she has created.

This is one of the most exciting, moving ideas I have across in a long time.

Sunday 18 December 2011

11:34 GMTPermanent link to #How do you develop intrinsic motivation?# How do you develop intrinsic motivation? - Comments (0)

Those of you who know me, will be aware of my strong views about the role of rewards in KM and in business in general.

In the KM World Discussion Form (note: you need to be a member of the forum to read this) there is a short discussion on rewarding knowledge sharing.

In it, Mahesh Varavooru poses the question "How do you develop intrinsic motivation? Or is it a fact that it cannot be developed?".

This was my reply:

In his book Drive, Dan Pink states that there are 3 fundamental things that research has shown to motivate us:
  • Autonomy: the freedom to do what we want how we want
  • Mastery: the freedom to master a discipline, to become "the best"
  • Purpose: a higher purpose then earning money; doing something that we feel is worthwhile


So as a manager, possible ways to allow people's intrinsic motivation to emerge might include:
  • giving them more autonomy in how they do their work
  • giving them more time and opportunity to master their chosen field or profession
  • where possible allowing them to pursue or identify a purpose in their work other than just making money

I would also add that we should start with the assumption that all of us wish to do good work.

And so we should stop trying to do things to each other by rewarding each other with goodies or trying to manipulate each other in any other way.

We should treat each other with respect and work together for the common good.

It may seem idealistic but I suspect this is far more effective than trying to manipulate people.

Motivation is emergent. If you try to develop it in someone its not motivation - its manipulation.

Not everyone agrees - that's not surprising - but take a look at what Dan Pink has to say and the works of Alfie Kohn - it's food for thought :-)

Sunday 18 December 2011

11:20 GMTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: December 2011# Knowledge tweets: December 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for November - December 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.


,
11:20 GMTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: December 2011# Knowledge tweets: December 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for November - December 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.


,
11:20 GMTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: December 2011# Knowledge tweets: December 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for November - December 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.



Friday 9 December 2011

12:00 GMTPermanent link to #Introduction to the December 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the December 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

Kiva is a non-profit organization with a mission to connect people through lending to alleviate poverty.

Kiva lets you lend as little as $25 to people without access to traditional banking systems

Its simple:

  • You join Kiva.
  • With your credit card you make US$25 loans to people of your choosing.
  • They pay back the loans with no interest and you get regular updates.
  • There is 98.93% repayment rate. And over US$263 million has been loaned to date.
  • When you have been repaid you can loan the money again or withdraw it..


I have made 14 loans since I started in December 2007 and at Christmas I will add a little more money to the pot to enable me to make some more loans. Its not a lot but every liitle helps and its so easy and effective :-)

If you like the idea, why not make a loan yourself to someone this Christmas.

As usual at Christmas, the knowledge letter is short but I'll be back in full swing in 2012 :-)

Here's wishing you a merry Christmas and a happy New Year.

Saturday 19 November 2011

13:55 GMTPermanent link to #What is the function of KM?# What is the function of KM? - Comments (0)

I am a big fan of the work and thinking of Dave Snowden and follow his talks and blog posts quite closely.

For a long time he has been making the point that Knowledge Management should be about supporting effective decision making and creating the conditions for innovation but in a recent post that mainly dealt with What is the function of KM?, he added a third point that I have clipped below.
  • Firstly, to support effective decision making ...

  • Secondly, we need to create the conditions for innovation ...

  • Thirdly, knowledge management is all about communication and that doesn't just mean the top down focus that is all too common place, although it does permit it. Dealing with uncertainty often focuses on things like values and mission statements. However writing your values down means that you have just lost them. All you have done is teach people the language of power and it will come back to you in slide presentations and proposals. The Bible teaches through parables, stories that carry necessary ambiguity and hence adaptability but you can't talk your way out of their message.

    This is the key switch from managing rule base cultures, to enabling an ideation culture. That means understanding the micro-narratives of day to day conversations, sensing the evolutionary potential of the system. It can also involve the use of metaphor. Like the parables referenced above, metaphors carry with them essential ambiguity and adaptability which paradoxically allows them to me more precise in day to day communication both up and down.

    Narrative is a broad field that too many people seek to narrow and its a lot more sophisticated in both theory and practice than many people would have you believe.

    Its also about how we use technology to link and connect people in different ways


I don't think Dave means to imply an order in these three points but I would put communication first as connecting people, improved communication and better conversations ultimately leads to effective decision making and innovation.

Saturday 19 November 2011

13:05 GMTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: November 2011# Knowledge tweets: November 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for October - November 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.


,
13:05 GMTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: November 2011# Knowledge tweets: November 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for October - November 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.


,
13:05 GMTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: November 2011# Knowledge tweets: November 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for October - November 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.



Saturday 12 November 2011

20:37 GMTPermanent link to #The notion of an emerging global one world classroom# The notion of an emerging global one world classroom - Comments (0)

I wrote recently about flip teaching and even flip conferences that have been inspired by the work of Salman Kahn.

If you don't know about Salman Kahn and the Kahn Academy here is your opportunity to learn more about him and his work in the TED video Salman Khan: Lets use video to reinvent education.

Towards the end Sal talks about "the notion of an emerging global one world classroom" (watch from 15:47 on). What a concept! Knowledge sharing, learning, peer to peer tutoring, coaching and mentoring on a global scale. Its early days but this has got to play a major role in the future of education.
Salman Khan talks about how and why he created the remarkable Khan Academy, a carefully structured series of educational videos offering complete curricula in math and, now, other subjects.

He shows the power of interactive exercises, and calls for teachers to consider flipping the traditional classroom script -- give students video lectures to watch at home, and do "homework" in the classroom with the teacher available to help.


,
20:37 GMTPermanent link to #The notion of an emerging global one world classroom# The notion of an emerging global one world classroom - Comments (0)

I wrote recently about flip teaching and even flip conferences that have been inspired by the work of Salman Kahn.

If you don't know about Salman Kahn and the Kahn Academy here is your opportunity to learn more about him and his work in the TED video Salman Khan: Lets use video to reinvent education.

Towards the end Sal talks about "the notion of an emerging global one world classroom" (watch from 15:47 on). What a concept! Knowledge sharing, learning, peer to peer tutoring, coaching and mentoring on a global scale. Its early days but this has got to play a major role in the future of education.
Salman Khan talks about how and why he created the remarkable Khan Academy, a carefully structured series of educational videos offering complete curricula in math and, now, other subjects.

He shows the power of interactive exercises, and calls for teachers to consider flipping the traditional classroom script -- give students video lectures to watch at home, and do "homework" in the classroom with the teacher available to help.


,
20:37 GMTPermanent link to #The notion of an emerging global one world classroom# The notion of an emerging global one world classroom - Comments (0)

I wrote recently about flip teaching and even flip conferences that have been inspired by the work of Salman Kahn.

If you don't know about Salman Kahn and the Kahn Academy here is your opportunity to learn more about him and his work in the TED video Salman Khan: Lets use video to reinvent education.

Towards the end Sal talks about "the notion of an emerging global one world classroom" (watch from 15:47 on). What a concept! Knowledge sharing, learning, peer to peer tutoring, coaching and mentoring on a global scale. Its early days but this has got to play a major role in the future of education.
Salman Khan talks about how and why he created the remarkable Khan Academy, a carefully structured series of educational videos offering complete curricula in math and, now, other subjects.

He shows the power of interactive exercises, and calls for teachers to consider flipping the traditional classroom script -- give students video lectures to watch at home, and do "homework" in the classroom with the teacher available to help.


,
20:37 GMTPermanent link to #The notion of an emerging global one world classroom# The notion of an emerging global one world classroom - Comments (0)

I wrote recently about flip teaching and even flip conferences that have been inspired by the work of Salman Kahn.

If you don't know about Salman Kahn and the Kahn Academy here is your opportunity to learn more about him and his work in the TED video Salman Khan: Lets use video to reinvent education.

Towards the end Sal talks about "the notion of an emerging global one world classroom" (watch from 15:47 on). What a concept! Knowledge sharing, learning, peer to peer tutoring, coaching and mentoring on a global scale. Its early days but this has got to play a major role in the future of education.
Salman Khan talks about how and why he created the remarkable Khan Academy, a carefully structured series of educational videos offering complete curricula in math and, now, other subjects.

He shows the power of interactive exercises, and calls for teachers to consider flipping the traditional classroom script -- give students video lectures to watch at home, and do "homework" in the classroom with the teacher available to help.


,
20:37 GMTPermanent link to #The notion of an emerging global one world classroom# The notion of an emerging global one world classroom - Comments (0)

I wrote recently about flip teaching and even flip conferences that have been inspired by the work of Salman Kahn.

If you don't know about Salman Kahn and the Kahn Academy here is your opportunity to learn more about him and his work in the TED video Salman Khan: Lets use video to reinvent education.

Towards the end Sal talks about "the notion of an emerging global one world classroom" (watch from 15:47 on). What a concept! Knowledge sharing, learning, peer to peer tutoring, coaching and mentoring on a global scale. Its early days but this has got to play a major role in the future of education.
Salman Khan talks about how and why he created the remarkable Khan Academy, a carefully structured series of educational videos offering complete curricula in math and, now, other subjects.

He shows the power of interactive exercises, and calls for teachers to consider flipping the traditional classroom script -- give students video lectures to watch at home, and do "homework" in the classroom with the teacher available to help.


,
20:37 GMTPermanent link to #The notion of an emerging global one world classroom# The notion of an emerging global one world classroom - Comments (0)

I wrote recently about flip teaching and even flip conferences that have been inspired by the work of Salman Kahn.

If you don't know about Salman Kahn and the Kahn Academy here is your opportunity to learn more about him and his work in the TED video Salman Khan: Lets use video to reinvent education.

Towards the end Sal talks about "the notion of an emerging global one world classroom" (watch from 15:47 on). What a concept! Knowledge sharing, learning, peer to peer tutoring, coaching and mentoring on a global scale. Its early days but this has got to play a major role in the future of education.
Salman Khan talks about how and why he created the remarkable Khan Academy, a carefully structured series of educational videos offering complete curricula in math and, now, other subjects.

He shows the power of interactive exercises, and calls for teachers to consider flipping the traditional classroom script -- give students video lectures to watch at home, and do "homework" in the classroom with the teacher available to help.



Saturday 12 November 2011

09:56 GMTPermanent link to #Plaudern wie im Pub (Like a chat in the pub)# Plaudern wie im Pub (Like a chat in the pub) - Comments (0)

Amazingly, I have had two articles on my Knowledge Cafe written by German authors and published in German magazines this last month or so. The first is by Sascha Reimann:

Plaudern wie im Pub (Like a chat in the pub)
Published in Training Aktuell Magazine, October 2011

Training aktuell is a trade magazine focussing on professional training, learning & development, coaching and consulting. For 22 years we have been delivering concise information for training and coaching professionals including useful tools and practical advise for them to use in the classroom as well as in their offices. Here you can find some excerpts: http://bit.ly/peUoAI. You can also follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

Training aktuell ist eine Zeitschrift speziell für Trainer, Berater und Coachs. Seit 22 Jahren liefert es wichtige Informationen, Arbeitshilfen und praktische Tipps für Weiterbildner -- im Seminar und darüber hinaus. Eine Leseprobe finden Sie hier: http://bit.ly/peUoAI. Sie finden uns unter http://www.trainingaktuell.de, auf Twitter und auf Facebook.

You can read the article for free on Scribd

And here is the second by Elisabeth Wagner

Das Knowledge Cafe nach David Gurteen (David Gurteen's Knowledge Cafe)
Published in the Project Magazine: November 2011

The Project Magazine is the leading German language magazine for project managers.
Das Projekt Magazin ist das führende deutschsprachige Fachmedium für Projektmanager.

"Dead by PowerPoint" -- so lautete das Urteil des britischen Experten für Wissensmanagement, David Gurteen, nach dem Besuch einer typischen, mit Informationen überfrachteten Fachkonferenz. Dennoch zog er einen wesentlichen Gewinn daraus: Wirklich etwas gebracht hatten ihm Gesprä che mit anderen Teilnehmern am Rande der Konferenz, in der Kaffeepause oder abends im Pub. Diese Erkenntnis war Basis des Knowledge Cafes, einer von ihm entwickelten Methode zum Wissensaustausch in der Gruppe. Elisabeth Wagner beschreibt das Vorgehen sowie Anwendungsmö glichkeiten im Projektmanagement.

If you would like a free copy of this second article then please send me a request by email and I will return you a PDF of the article as the publishers will not allow me to publish the article for free on-line.


Gurteen Knowledge Cafe: SMARTlab at the University of East London

Knowledge Cafés as KM Tools. KM India 2010

Gurteen Knowledge Cafe at KMPAP 2006 in Hong Kong
Introduction to the Knowledge Cafe, Greenwich 2006
KM Egypt, Cairo, 2010
About the Gurteen Knowledge Cafe, 2009

,
09:56 GMTPermanent link to #Plaudern wie im Pub (Like a chat in the pub)# Plaudern wie im Pub (Like a chat in the pub) - Comments (0)

Amazingly, I have had two articles on my Knowledge Cafe written by German authors and published in German magazines this last month or so. The first is by Sascha Reimann:

Plaudern wie im Pub (Like a chat in the pub)
Published in Training Aktuell Magazine, October 2011

Training aktuell is a trade magazine focussing on professional training, learning & development, coaching and consulting. For 22 years we have been delivering concise information for training and coaching professionals including useful tools and practical advise for them to use in the classroom as well as in their offices. Here you can find some excerpts: http://bit.ly/peUoAI. You can also follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

Training aktuell ist eine Zeitschrift speziell für Trainer, Berater und Coachs. Seit 22 Jahren liefert es wichtige Informationen, Arbeitshilfen und praktische Tipps für Weiterbildner -- im Seminar und darüber hinaus. Eine Leseprobe finden Sie hier: http://bit.ly/peUoAI. Sie finden uns unter http://www.trainingaktuell.de, auf Twitter und auf Facebook.

You can read the article for free on Scribd

And here is the second by Elisabeth Wagner

Das Knowledge Cafe nach David Gurteen (David Gurteen's Knowledge Cafe)
Published in the Project Magazine: November 2011

The Project Magazine is the leading German language magazine for project managers.
Das Projekt Magazin ist das führende deutschsprachige Fachmedium für Projektmanager.

"Dead by PowerPoint" -- so lautete das Urteil des britischen Experten für Wissensmanagement, David Gurteen, nach dem Besuch einer typischen, mit Informationen überfrachteten Fachkonferenz. Dennoch zog er einen wesentlichen Gewinn daraus: Wirklich etwas gebracht hatten ihm Gesprä che mit anderen Teilnehmern am Rande der Konferenz, in der Kaffeepause oder abends im Pub. Diese Erkenntnis war Basis des Knowledge Cafes, einer von ihm entwickelten Methode zum Wissensaustausch in der Gruppe. Elisabeth Wagner beschreibt das Vorgehen sowie Anwendungsmö glichkeiten im Projektmanagement.

If you would like a free copy of this second article then please send me a request by email and I will return you a PDF of the article as the publishers will not allow me to publish the article for free on-line.


Gurteen Knowledge Cafe: SMARTlab at the University of East London

Knowledge Cafés as KM Tools. KM India 2010

Gurteen Knowledge Cafe at KMPAP 2006 in Hong Kong
Introduction to the Knowledge Cafe, Greenwich 2006
KM Egypt, Cairo, 2010
About the Gurteen Knowledge Cafe, 2009

,
09:56 GMTPermanent link to #Plaudern wie im Pub (Like a chat in the pub)# Plaudern wie im Pub (Like a chat in the pub) - Comments (0)

Amazingly, I have had two articles on my Knowledge Cafe written by German authors and published in German magazines this last month or so. The first is by Sascha Reimann:

Plaudern wie im Pub (Like a chat in the pub)
Published in Training Aktuell Magazine, October 2011

Training aktuell is a trade magazine focussing on professional training, learning & development, coaching and consulting. For 22 years we have been delivering concise information for training and coaching professionals including useful tools and practical advise for them to use in the classroom as well as in their offices. Here you can find some excerpts: http://bit.ly/peUoAI. You can also follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

Training aktuell ist eine Zeitschrift speziell für Trainer, Berater und Coachs. Seit 22 Jahren liefert es wichtige Informationen, Arbeitshilfen und praktische Tipps für Weiterbildner -- im Seminar und darüber hinaus. Eine Leseprobe finden Sie hier: http://bit.ly/peUoAI. Sie finden uns unter http://www.trainingaktuell.de, auf Twitter und auf Facebook.

You can read the article for free on Scribd

And here is the second by Elisabeth Wagner

Das Knowledge Cafe nach David Gurteen (David Gurteen's Knowledge Cafe)
Published in the Project Magazine: November 2011

The Project Magazine is the leading German language magazine for project managers.
Das Projekt Magazin ist das führende deutschsprachige Fachmedium für Projektmanager.

"Dead by PowerPoint" -- so lautete das Urteil des britischen Experten für Wissensmanagement, David Gurteen, nach dem Besuch einer typischen, mit Informationen überfrachteten Fachkonferenz. Dennoch zog er einen wesentlichen Gewinn daraus: Wirklich etwas gebracht hatten ihm Gesprä che mit anderen Teilnehmern am Rande der Konferenz, in der Kaffeepause oder abends im Pub. Diese Erkenntnis war Basis des Knowledge Cafes, einer von ihm entwickelten Methode zum Wissensaustausch in der Gruppe. Elisabeth Wagner beschreibt das Vorgehen sowie Anwendungsmö glichkeiten im Projektmanagement.

If you would like a free copy of this second article then please send me a request by email and I will return you a PDF of the article as the publishers will not allow me to publish the article for free on-line.


Gurteen Knowledge Cafe: SMARTlab at the University of East London

Knowledge Cafés as KM Tools. KM India 2010

Gurteen Knowledge Cafe at KMPAP 2006 in Hong Kong
Introduction to the Knowledge Cafe, Greenwich 2006
KM Egypt, Cairo, 2010
About the Gurteen Knowledge Cafe, 2009


Friday 11 November 2011

22:39 GMTPermanent link to #Dont do KM in the Middle East# Dont do KM in the Middle East - Comments (0)

I have just posted a video of my keynote talk earlier year at KM Middle East 2011 in Abu Dhabi entitled Don't Do KM.


Video: David Gurteen's keynote talk at KM Middle East 2011



David Gurteen's keynote talk at KM Middle East 2011, Abu Dhabi, UAE. Don't do KM.

Media Information: Image

I said this in an earlier post on the topic:

So often when people start a so called KM initiative they ask the question "How do we do KM?" and "What are the benefits?". To my mind this is the wrong place to start. We should start with the question "What are the business problems we are facing and how can KM help." This ensures a sharp focus on business outcomes. The benefits? - well they are your desired outcomes. Simple really! Hence "Don't do KM!"

I will be speaking again at KM Middle East 2012 again in Abu Dhabi but this time on "Conversation for Empowerment" and running a half-day seminar on "Conversation: Your most powerful KM Tool". I also hope to run an open Knowledge Cafe in Dubai on the Sunday evening before the conference. I'll post more on these events later.
,
22:39 GMTPermanent link to #Dont do KM in the Middle East# Dont do KM in the Middle East - Comments (0)

I have just posted a video of my keynote talk earlier year at KM Middle East 2011 in Abu Dhabi entitled Don't Do KM.


Video: David Gurteen's keynote talk at KM Middle East 2011



David Gurteen's keynote talk at KM Middle East 2011, Abu Dhabi, UAE. Don't do KM.

Media Information: Image

I said this in an earlier post on the topic:

So often when people start a so called KM initiative they ask the question "How do we do KM?" and "What are the benefits?". To my mind this is the wrong place to start. We should start with the question "What are the business problems we are facing and how can KM help." This ensures a sharp focus on business outcomes. The benefits? - well they are your desired outcomes. Simple really! Hence "Don't do KM!"

I will be speaking again at KM Middle East 2012 again in Abu Dhabi but this time on "Conversation for Empowerment" and running a half-day seminar on "Conversation: Your most powerful KM Tool". I also hope to run an open Knowledge Cafe in Dubai on the Sunday evening before the conference. I'll post more on these events later.
,
22:39 GMTPermanent link to #Dont do KM in the Middle East# Dont do KM in the Middle East - Comments (0)

I have just posted a video of my keynote talk earlier year at KM Middle East 2011 in Abu Dhabi entitled Don't Do KM.


Video: David Gurteen's keynote talk at KM Middle East 2011



David Gurteen's keynote talk at KM Middle East 2011, Abu Dhabi, UAE. Don't do KM.

Media Information: Image

I said this in an earlier post on the topic:

So often when people start a so called KM initiative they ask the question "How do we do KM?" and "What are the benefits?". To my mind this is the wrong place to start. We should start with the question "What are the business problems we are facing and how can KM help." This ensures a sharp focus on business outcomes. The benefits? - well they are your desired outcomes. Simple really! Hence "Don't do KM!"

I will be speaking again at KM Middle East 2012 again in Abu Dhabi but this time on "Conversation for Empowerment" and running a half-day seminar on "Conversation: Your most powerful KM Tool". I also hope to run an open Knowledge Cafe in Dubai on the Sunday evening before the conference. I'll post more on these events later.
,
22:39 GMTPermanent link to #Dont do KM in the Middle East# Dont do KM in the Middle East - Comments (0)

I have just posted a video of my keynote talk earlier year at KM Middle East 2011 in Abu Dhabi entitled Don't Do KM.


Video: David Gurteen's keynote talk at KM Middle East 2011



David Gurteen's keynote talk at KM Middle East 2011, Abu Dhabi, UAE. Don't do KM.

Media Information: Image

I said this in an earlier post on the topic:

So often when people start a so called KM initiative they ask the question "How do we do KM?" and "What are the benefits?". To my mind this is the wrong place to start. We should start with the question "What are the business problems we are facing and how can KM help." This ensures a sharp focus on business outcomes. The benefits? - well they are your desired outcomes. Simple really! Hence "Don't do KM!"

I will be speaking again at KM Middle East 2012 again in Abu Dhabi but this time on "Conversation for Empowerment" and running a half-day seminar on "Conversation: Your most powerful KM Tool". I also hope to run an open Knowledge Cafe in Dubai on the Sunday evening before the conference. I'll post more on these events later.
,
22:39 GMTPermanent link to #Dont do KM in the Middle East# Dont do KM in the Middle East - Comments (0)

I have just posted a video of my keynote talk earlier year at KM Middle East 2011 in Abu Dhabi entitled Don't Do KM.


Video: David Gurteen's keynote talk at KM Middle East 2011



David Gurteen's keynote talk at KM Middle East 2011, Abu Dhabi, UAE. Don't do KM.

Media Information: Image

I said this in an earlier post on the topic:

So often when people start a so called KM initiative they ask the question "How do we do KM?" and "What are the benefits?". To my mind this is the wrong place to start. We should start with the question "What are the business problems we are facing and how can KM help." This ensures a sharp focus on business outcomes. The benefits? - well they are your desired outcomes. Simple really! Hence "Don't do KM!"

I will be speaking again at KM Middle East 2012 again in Abu Dhabi but this time on "Conversation for Empowerment" and running a half-day seminar on "Conversation: Your most powerful KM Tool". I also hope to run an open Knowledge Cafe in Dubai on the Sunday evening before the conference. I'll post more on these events later.

Friday 11 November 2011

22:26 GMTPermanent link to #Going off topic in a Knowledge Cafe# Going off topic in a Knowledge Cafe - Comments (0)

A few weeks back, I helped someone writing an article on my Knowledge Cafes by answering questions by email.

This was one of the questions: You say: "The question is only a seed. It's okay to go off topic. "Doesn't that bring the danger of dissipation of the conversation? Or causing problems after the participants have changed the tables?

This was my answer:

The Knowledge Cafe is not about trying to control people and what they say or talk about. Its about treating them as adults.

Conversations go off topic in everyday life - all of the time. That's the intrinsic nature of conversation, If you try to control conversation - you destroy it. If the topic is important to the participants and the right one - they will quickly return to it.

It also allows issues to emerge that were not anticipated. This is at the heart of what the Cafe is all about. You need the freedom to explore stuff. And you need the freedom for people to relax and tell personal stories and share anecdotes.

Rather then dissipate the conversation - it keeps it natural and enlivens it,

And there is not a problem when people change tables ... the sidetrack either dies or if it is important it is built upon

Friday 11 November 2011

22:09 GMTPermanent link to #Podcast: Knowledge Cafes: A conversation with David Gurteen# Podcast: Knowledge Cafes: A conversation with David Gurteen - Comments (0)

Geraldine Clement-Stoneham of SLA Europe did a little audio interview with me the other day.

David Gurteen is a well known figure of the knowledge management world. For several years, he has been touring the world introducing knowledge cafés as a way to re-discover the power of conversation to exchange knowledge. In this interview, David introduces himself, and how he became involved in knowledge management. He explains the principles behind knowledge cafés, and how they represent a great KM tool, including in the business environment. He touches briefly on cultural differences in the way people approach conversation, and invites us to join him to live the experience in one of his workshop, or the many cafés he runs for his community.



Thursday 27 October 2011

10:22 GDTPermanent link to #Social Media versus Knowledge Management: A false dichotomy# Social Media versus Knowledge Management: A false dichotomy - Comments (0)

I have just read an article Social Media versus Knowledge Management on the HBR Blog Network where the authors Anthony Bradley and MarMcDonald say the following.
  • Knowledge management is what company management tells me I need to know, based on what they think is important.

  • Social media is how my peers show me what they think is important, based on their experience and in a way that I can judge for myself.
I rarely post comments against articles but in this case I simply had to reply:
Funny, this is not the KM that I observe.

KM has rarely been "what company management tells me I need to know, based on what they think is important"

and has always been at its best about "how my peers show me what they think is important, based on their experience and in a way that I can judge for myself".

Peer assists, after action reviews, retrospects, open space, knowledge cafes .... the core face to face conversational processes of KM are naturally peer to peer

and people within organisations use social media as KM tools to have electronically mediated conversations, to share and to collaborate! 

KM is fundamentally social in its nature.

In the article, there are some excellent points made about the use social media in an organisation but to my mind the comparison with KM is a false dichotomy and pure fiction.
Some other thoughts of mine on KM and social media: It still surprises me how many people do not understand the nature of KM.
,
10:22 GDTPermanent link to #Social Media versus Knowledge Management: A false dichotomy# Social Media versus Knowledge Management: A false dichotomy - Comments (0)

I have just read an article Social Media versus Knowledge Management on the HBR Blog Network where the authors Anthony Bradley and MarMcDonald say the following.
  • Knowledge management is what company management tells me I need to know, based on what they think is important.

  • Social media is how my peers show me what they think is important, based on their experience and in a way that I can judge for myself.
I rarely post comments against articles but in this case I simply had to reply:
Funny, this is not the KM that I observe.

KM has rarely been "what company management tells me I need to know, based on what they think is important"

and has always been at its best about "how my peers show me what they think is important, based on their experience and in a way that I can judge for myself".

Peer assists, after action reviews, retrospects, open space, knowledge cafes .... the core face to face conversational processes of KM are naturally peer to peer

and people within organisations use social media as KM tools to have electronically mediated conversations, to share and to collaborate! 

KM is fundamentally social in its nature.

In the article, there are some excellent points made about the use social media in an organisation but to my mind the comparison with KM is a false dichotomy and pure fiction.
Some other thoughts of mine on KM and social media: It still surprises me how many people do not understand the nature of KM.
,
10:22 GDTPermanent link to #Social Media versus Knowledge Management: A false dichotomy# Social Media versus Knowledge Management: A false dichotomy - Comments (0)

I have just read an article Social Media versus Knowledge Management on the HBR Blog Network where the authors Anthony Bradley and MarMcDonald say the following.
  • Knowledge management is what company management tells me I need to know, based on what they think is important.

  • Social media is how my peers show me what they think is important, based on their experience and in a way that I can judge for myself.
I rarely post comments against articles but in this case I simply had to reply:
Funny, this is not the KM that I observe.

KM has rarely been "what company management tells me I need to know, based on what they think is important"

and has always been at its best about "how my peers show me what they think is important, based on their experience and in a way that I can judge for myself".

Peer assists, after action reviews, retrospects, open space, knowledge cafes .... the core face to face conversational processes of KM are naturally peer to peer

and people within organisations use social media as KM tools to have electronically mediated conversations, to share and to collaborate! 

KM is fundamentally social in its nature.

In the article, there are some excellent points made about the use social media in an organisation but to my mind the comparison with KM is a false dichotomy and pure fiction.
Some other thoughts of mine on KM and social media: It still surprises me how many people do not understand the nature of KM.

Wednesday 26 October 2011

21:23 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the November 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the November 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

So much has been written about Steve Jobs since his death in early October.

What I have enjoyed the most is his sister's eulogy for him.

As you might expect it is about Steve Jobs - the man. If you have not read it - take a look - it shows him in a different light to all the other articles.
,
21:23 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the November 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the November 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

So much has been written about Steve Jobs since his death in early October.

What I have enjoyed the most is his sister's eulogy for him.

As you might expect it is about Steve Jobs - the man. If you have not read it - take a look - it shows him in a different light to all the other articles.

Wednesday 26 October 2011

11:07 GDTPermanent link to #My next public Knowledge Cafe workshop is in London on 13 December 2011# My next public Knowledge Cafe workshop is in London on 13 December 2011 - Comments (0)

I am running my next public Knowledge Cafe workshop in London on 13 December 2011 at the RSA. Its about six weeks to go and I already have six people signed-up. So looking good :-)

The day is fundamentally about "How to design and run Knowledge Cafes" and put them to good business purpose but we also take a look at the whole role of conversation in our organizational lives. After all, conversation is not only a powerful learning technology, it is the best KM tool we have at our disposal.

You will find more information here if you are interested.

Take a look at the six short videos at the bottom of the page if you want to learn more or actually watch a knowledge cafe being held.

I realise London is a long way to come for a workshop for many of you but I hope to be running more workshops around the world in 2012.
,
11:07 GDTPermanent link to #My next public Knowledge Cafe workshop is in London on 13 December 2011# My next public Knowledge Cafe workshop is in London on 13 December 2011 - Comments (0)

I am running my next public Knowledge Cafe workshop in London on 13 December 2011 at the RSA. Its about six weeks to go and I already have six people signed-up. So looking good :-)

The day is fundamentally about "How to design and run Knowledge Cafes" and put them to good business purpose but we also take a look at the whole role of conversation in our organizational lives. After all, conversation is not only a powerful learning technology, it is the best KM tool we have at our disposal.

You will find more information here if you are interested.

Take a look at the six short videos at the bottom of the page if you want to learn more or actually watch a knowledge cafe being held.

I realise London is a long way to come for a workshop for many of you but I hope to be running more workshops around the world in 2012.
,
11:07 GDTPermanent link to #My next public Knowledge Cafe workshop is in London on 13 December 2011# My next public Knowledge Cafe workshop is in London on 13 December 2011 - Comments (0)

I am running my next public Knowledge Cafe workshop in London on 13 December 2011 at the RSA. Its about six weeks to go and I already have six people signed-up. So looking good :-)

The day is fundamentally about "How to design and run Knowledge Cafes" and put them to good business purpose but we also take a look at the whole role of conversation in our organizational lives. After all, conversation is not only a powerful learning technology, it is the best KM tool we have at our disposal.

You will find more information here if you are interested.

Take a look at the six short videos at the bottom of the page if you want to learn more or actually watch a knowledge cafe being held.

I realise London is a long way to come for a workshop for many of you but I hope to be running more workshops around the world in 2012.
,
11:07 GDTPermanent link to #My next public Knowledge Cafe workshop is in London on 13 December 2011# My next public Knowledge Cafe workshop is in London on 13 December 2011 - Comments (0)

I am running my next public Knowledge Cafe workshop in London on 13 December 2011 at the RSA. Its about six weeks to go and I already have six people signed-up. So looking good :-)

The day is fundamentally about "How to design and run Knowledge Cafes" and put them to good business purpose but we also take a look at the whole role of conversation in our organizational lives. After all, conversation is not only a powerful learning technology, it is the best KM tool we have at our disposal.

You will find more information here if you are interested.

Take a look at the six short videos at the bottom of the page if you want to learn more or actually watch a knowledge cafe being held.

I realise London is a long way to come for a workshop for many of you but I hope to be running more workshops around the world in 2012.

Wednesday 26 October 2011

10:49 GDTPermanent link to #Seize the day boys make your lives extraordinary# Seize the day boys make your lives extraordinary - Comments (0)

A post from Johnnie Moore on Living in the present where he quotes from a post by Esko Kilpi Complexity. The new world between chance and choice.
The sciences of complexity change our perspective and thinking. Perhaps, as a result we should, especially in management, focus more attention on what we are doing than what we should be doing. Following the thinking presented by the most advanced scientific researchers, the important question to answer is not what should happen in the future, but what is happening now?

Our focus should be on the communicative interaction creating the continuously developing pattern that is our life.

reminds me of a quote of Dave Snowden's
Knowledge Management should be focused on real, tangible intractable problems not aspirational goals. It should deal pragmatically with the evolutionary possibilities of the present rather then seeking idealistic solutions.

Credit: Dave Snowden
We really must get away from talking conceptually about the future and "Seize the Day". Seneca and Horace understood this over 2,000 years ago.

The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. We let go the present, which we have in our power, and look forward to that which depends upon chance, and so relinquish a certainty for an uncertainty.

Scale back your long hopes to a short period. While we  speak, time is envious and is running away from us. Seize the day, trusting  little in the future.

Credit: Horace
And more recently, in this wonderful clip from the film "The Dead Poet's Society with Robin Williams.

"Carpe diem is the Latin for Seize the day!"



I have blogged about this before in On idealistic solutions.
,
10:49 GDTPermanent link to #Seize the day boys make your lives extraordinary# Seize the day boys make your lives extraordinary - Comments (0)

A post from Johnnie Moore on Living in the present where he quotes from a post by Esko Kilpi Complexity. The new world between chance and choice.
The sciences of complexity change our perspective and thinking. Perhaps, as a result we should, especially in management, focus more attention on what we are doing than what we should be doing. Following the thinking presented by the most advanced scientific researchers, the important question to answer is not what should happen in the future, but what is happening now?

Our focus should be on the communicative interaction creating the continuously developing pattern that is our life.

reminds me of a quote of Dave Snowden's
Knowledge Management should be focused on real, tangible intractable problems not aspirational goals. It should deal pragmatically with the evolutionary possibilities of the present rather then seeking idealistic solutions.

Credit: Dave Snowden
We really must get away from talking conceptually about the future and "Seize the Day". Seneca and Horace understood this over 2,000 years ago.

The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. We let go the present, which we have in our power, and look forward to that which depends upon chance, and so relinquish a certainty for an uncertainty.

Scale back your long hopes to a short period. While we  speak, time is envious and is running away from us. Seize the day, trusting  little in the future.

Credit: Horace
And more recently, in this wonderful clip from the film "The Dead Poet's Society with Robin Williams.

"Carpe diem is the Latin for Seize the day!"



I have blogged about this before in On idealistic solutions.
,
10:49 GDTPermanent link to #Seize the day boys make your lives extraordinary# Seize the day boys make your lives extraordinary - Comments (0)

A post from Johnnie Moore on Living in the present where he quotes from a post by Esko Kilpi Complexity. The new world between chance and choice.
The sciences of complexity change our perspective and thinking. Perhaps, as a result we should, especially in management, focus more attention on what we are doing than what we should be doing. Following the thinking presented by the most advanced scientific researchers, the important question to answer is not what should happen in the future, but what is happening now?

Our focus should be on the communicative interaction creating the continuously developing pattern that is our life.

reminds me of a quote of Dave Snowden's
Knowledge Management should be focused on real, tangible intractable problems not aspirational goals. It should deal pragmatically with the evolutionary possibilities of the present rather then seeking idealistic solutions.

Credit: Dave Snowden
We really must get away from talking conceptually about the future and "Seize the Day". Seneca and Horace understood this over 2,000 years ago.

The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. We let go the present, which we have in our power, and look forward to that which depends upon chance, and so relinquish a certainty for an uncertainty.

Scale back your long hopes to a short period. While we  speak, time is envious and is running away from us. Seize the day, trusting  little in the future.

Credit: Horace
And more recently, in this wonderful clip from the film "The Dead Poet's Society with Robin Williams.

"Carpe diem is the Latin for Seize the day!"



I have blogged about this before in On idealistic solutions.
,
10:49 GDTPermanent link to #Seize the day boys make your lives extraordinary# Seize the day boys make your lives extraordinary - Comments (0)

A post from Johnnie Moore on Living in the present where he quotes from a post by Esko Kilpi Complexity. The new world between chance and choice.
The sciences of complexity change our perspective and thinking. Perhaps, as a result we should, especially in management, focus more attention on what we are doing than what we should be doing. Following the thinking presented by the most advanced scientific researchers, the important question to answer is not what should happen in the future, but what is happening now?

Our focus should be on the communicative interaction creating the continuously developing pattern that is our life.

reminds me of a quote of Dave Snowden's
Knowledge Management should be focused on real, tangible intractable problems not aspirational goals. It should deal pragmatically with the evolutionary possibilities of the present rather then seeking idealistic solutions.

Credit: Dave Snowden
We really must get away from talking conceptually about the future and "Seize the Day". Seneca and Horace understood this over 2,000 years ago.

The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. We let go the present, which we have in our power, and look forward to that which depends upon chance, and so relinquish a certainty for an uncertainty.

Scale back your long hopes to a short period. While we  speak, time is envious and is running away from us. Seize the day, trusting  little in the future.

Credit: Horace
And more recently, in this wonderful clip from the film "The Dead Poet's Society with Robin Williams.

"Carpe diem is the Latin for Seize the day!"



I have blogged about this before in On idealistic solutions.
,
10:49 GDTPermanent link to #Seize the day boys make your lives extraordinary# Seize the day boys make your lives extraordinary - Comments (0)

A post from Johnnie Moore on Living in the present where he quotes from a post by Esko Kilpi Complexity. The new world between chance and choice.
The sciences of complexity change our perspective and thinking. Perhaps, as a result we should, especially in management, focus more attention on what we are doing than what we should be doing. Following the thinking presented by the most advanced scientific researchers, the important question to answer is not what should happen in the future, but what is happening now?

Our focus should be on the communicative interaction creating the continuously developing pattern that is our life.

reminds me of a quote of Dave Snowden's
Knowledge Management should be focused on real, tangible intractable problems not aspirational goals. It should deal pragmatically with the evolutionary possibilities of the present rather then seeking idealistic solutions.

Credit: Dave Snowden
We really must get away from talking conceptually about the future and "Seize the Day". Seneca and Horace understood this over 2,000 years ago.

The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. We let go the present, which we have in our power, and look forward to that which depends upon chance, and so relinquish a certainty for an uncertainty.

Scale back your long hopes to a short period. While we  speak, time is envious and is running away from us. Seize the day, trusting  little in the future.

Credit: Horace
And more recently, in this wonderful clip from the film "The Dead Poet's Society with Robin Williams.

"Carpe diem is the Latin for Seize the day!"



I have blogged about this before in On idealistic solutions.
,
10:49 GDTPermanent link to #Seize the day boys make your lives extraordinary# Seize the day boys make your lives extraordinary - Comments (0)

A post from Johnnie Moore on Living in the present where he quotes from a post by Esko Kilpi Complexity. The new world between chance and choice.
The sciences of complexity change our perspective and thinking. Perhaps, as a result we should, especially in management, focus more attention on what we are doing than what we should be doing. Following the thinking presented by the most advanced scientific researchers, the important question to answer is not what should happen in the future, but what is happening now?

Our focus should be on the communicative interaction creating the continuously developing pattern that is our life.

reminds me of a quote of Dave Snowden's
Knowledge Management should be focused on real, tangible intractable problems not aspirational goals. It should deal pragmatically with the evolutionary possibilities of the present rather then seeking idealistic solutions.

Credit: Dave Snowden
We really must get away from talking conceptually about the future and "Seize the Day". Seneca and Horace understood this over 2,000 years ago.

The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. We let go the present, which we have in our power, and look forward to that which depends upon chance, and so relinquish a certainty for an uncertainty.

Scale back your long hopes to a short period. While we  speak, time is envious and is running away from us. Seize the day, trusting  little in the future.

Credit: Horace
And more recently, in this wonderful clip from the film "The Dead Poet's Society with Robin Williams.

"Carpe diem is the Latin for Seize the day!"



I have blogged about this before in On idealistic solutions.

Wednesday 26 October 2011

08:50 GDTPermanent link to #Flipping heck - someone beat me to it!# Flipping heck - someone beat me to it! - Comments (0)

I recently posted an item about Flip Conferences based on the idea of Flip teaching. It then occurred to me that I may have been beaten to it and that others had made the same connection. So I did a Google search on flip conferences.

Sure enough, I am not the first to have made the connection and use the term, see Applying The Fisch Flip To Your Conference Model.

What if conference organizers and event professionals flipped the standard lecture presentation? What if the lecture was put online for people to view before the conference? People could then attend the session onsite and participate with the presenter and others in activities that helped them solidify concepts and ideas. They could engage in roundtable discussions with one another on what did and didn't work.

The same model could be used with Webinars. Conference presenters could deliver their foundation content in a Webinar. Attendees could view it at their leisure, apply concepts in real time at work and then bring questions, best practices and concerns to the conference. This could have great ROI for learning and retention from your conference or event. I think it has great promise.

How would your conference attendees adapt to flipping the conference education lecture presentation on YouTube and the onsite experience being interactive? What other conference processes, models or methods could be flipped today?

Flipping heck!

The problem I see with it though is that at present people tend not to do pre-conference work. They are either too busy or don't see the value. Maybe a little of both. I wonder if that will change over time.
,
08:50 GDTPermanent link to #Flipping heck - someone beat me to it!# Flipping heck - someone beat me to it! - Comments (0)

I recently posted an item about Flip Conferences based on the idea of Flip teaching. It then occurred to me that I may have been beaten to it and that others had made the same connection. So I did a Google search on flip conferences.

Sure enough, I am not the first to have made the connection and use the term, see Applying The Fisch Flip To Your Conference Model.

What if conference organizers and event professionals flipped the standard lecture presentation? What if the lecture was put online for people to view before the conference? People could then attend the session onsite and participate with the presenter and others in activities that helped them solidify concepts and ideas. They could engage in roundtable discussions with one another on what did and didn't work.

The same model could be used with Webinars. Conference presenters could deliver their foundation content in a Webinar. Attendees could view it at their leisure, apply concepts in real time at work and then bring questions, best practices and concerns to the conference. This could have great ROI for learning and retention from your conference or event. I think it has great promise.

How would your conference attendees adapt to flipping the conference education lecture presentation on YouTube and the onsite experience being interactive? What other conference processes, models or methods could be flipped today?

Flipping heck!

The problem I see with it though is that at present people tend not to do pre-conference work. They are either too busy or don't see the value. Maybe a little of both. I wonder if that will change over time.
,
08:50 GDTPermanent link to #Flipping heck - someone beat me to it!# Flipping heck - someone beat me to it! - Comments (0)

I recently posted an item about Flip Conferences based on the idea of Flip teaching. It then occurred to me that I may have been beaten to it and that others had made the same connection. So I did a Google search on flip conferences.

Sure enough, I am not the first to have made the connection and use the term, see Applying The Fisch Flip To Your Conference Model.

What if conference organizers and event professionals flipped the standard lecture presentation? What if the lecture was put online for people to view before the conference? People could then attend the session onsite and participate with the presenter and others in activities that helped them solidify concepts and ideas. They could engage in roundtable discussions with one another on what did and didn't work.

The same model could be used with Webinars. Conference presenters could deliver their foundation content in a Webinar. Attendees could view it at their leisure, apply concepts in real time at work and then bring questions, best practices and concerns to the conference. This could have great ROI for learning and retention from your conference or event. I think it has great promise.

How would your conference attendees adapt to flipping the conference education lecture presentation on YouTube and the onsite experience being interactive? What other conference processes, models or methods could be flipped today?

Flipping heck!

The problem I see with it though is that at present people tend not to do pre-conference work. They are either too busy or don't see the value. Maybe a little of both. I wonder if that will change over time.
,
08:50 GDTPermanent link to #Flipping heck - someone beat me to it!# Flipping heck - someone beat me to it! - Comments (0)

I recently posted an item about Flip Conferences based on the idea of Flip teaching. It then occurred to me that I may have been beaten to it and that others had made the same connection. So I did a Google search on flip conferences.

Sure enough, I am not the first to have made the connection and use the term, see Applying The Fisch Flip To Your Conference Model.

What if conference organizers and event professionals flipped the standard lecture presentation? What if the lecture was put online for people to view before the conference? People could then attend the session onsite and participate with the presenter and others in activities that helped them solidify concepts and ideas. They could engage in roundtable discussions with one another on what did and didn't work.

The same model could be used with Webinars. Conference presenters could deliver their foundation content in a Webinar. Attendees could view it at their leisure, apply concepts in real time at work and then bring questions, best practices and concerns to the conference. This could have great ROI for learning and retention from your conference or event. I think it has great promise.

How would your conference attendees adapt to flipping the conference education lecture presentation on YouTube and the onsite experience being interactive? What other conference processes, models or methods could be flipped today?

Flipping heck!

The problem I see with it though is that at present people tend not to do pre-conference work. They are either too busy or don't see the value. Maybe a little of both. I wonder if that will change over time.

Tuesday 25 October 2011

21:00 GDTPermanent link to #The role of spontaneous conversation# The role of spontaneous conversation - Comments (0)

A while back I wrote a blog post entitled Improving Understanding in which I told a story where I suggested to a student that she run mini Knowledge Cafes with fellow students to gain a deeper understanding of her studies.

In response, I received an email from Guillaume Boutard, a PhD. student from McGill University in Canada in which he told me about an interesting article in Wired Magazine Accept Defeat: The Neuroscience of Screwing Up whose conclusions he pointed out were similar to the ones I was making.

Here are two quotes from the article:
The reason we're so resistant to anomalous information -- the real reason researchers automatically assume that every unexpected result is a stupid mistake -- is rooted in the way the human brain works. Over the past few decades, psychologists have dismantled the myth of objectivity. The fact is, we carefully edit our reality, searching for evidence that confirms what we already believe. Although we pretend we're empiricists -- our views dictated by nothing but the facts -- we're actually blinkered, especially when it comes to information that contradicts our theories. The problem with science, then, isn't that most experiments fail -- it's that most failures are ignored.

While the scientific process is typically seen as a lonely pursuit -- researchers solve problems by themselves -- Dunbar found that most new scientific ideas emerged from lab meetings, those weekly sessions in which people publicly present their data. Interestingly, the most important element of the lab meeting wasn't the presentation -- it was the debate that followed. Dunbar observed that the skeptical (and sometimes heated) questions asked during a group session frequently triggered breakthroughs, as the scientists were forced to reconsider data they'd previously ignored. The new theory was a product of spontaneous conversation, not solitude; a single bracing query was enough to turn scientists into temporary outsiders, able to look anew at their own work.

An interesting article, including a section on "How to learn from failure".

And of course the bolding of spontaneous conversation in the above passage is my doing.
,
21:00 GDTPermanent link to #The role of spontaneous conversation# The role of spontaneous conversation - Comments (0)

A while back I wrote a blog post entitled Improving Understanding in which I told a story where I suggested to a student that she run mini Knowledge Cafes with fellow students to gain a deeper understanding of her studies.

In response, I received an email from Guillaume Boutard, a PhD. student from McGill University in Canada in which he told me about an interesting article in Wired Magazine Accept Defeat: The Neuroscience of Screwing Up whose conclusions he pointed out were similar to the ones I was making.

Here are two quotes from the article:
The reason we're so resistant to anomalous information -- the real reason researchers automatically assume that every unexpected result is a stupid mistake -- is rooted in the way the human brain works. Over the past few decades, psychologists have dismantled the myth of objectivity. The fact is, we carefully edit our reality, searching for evidence that confirms what we already believe. Although we pretend we're empiricists -- our views dictated by nothing but the facts -- we're actually blinkered, especially when it comes to information that contradicts our theories. The problem with science, then, isn't that most experiments fail -- it's that most failures are ignored.

While the scientific process is typically seen as a lonely pursuit -- researchers solve problems by themselves -- Dunbar found that most new scientific ideas emerged from lab meetings, those weekly sessions in which people publicly present their data. Interestingly, the most important element of the lab meeting wasn't the presentation -- it was the debate that followed. Dunbar observed that the skeptical (and sometimes heated) questions asked during a group session frequently triggered breakthroughs, as the scientists were forced to reconsider data they'd previously ignored. The new theory was a product of spontaneous conversation, not solitude; a single bracing query was enough to turn scientists into temporary outsiders, able to look anew at their own work.

An interesting article, including a section on "How to learn from failure".

And of course the bolding of spontaneous conversation in the above passage is my doing.

Tuesday 25 October 2011

15:54 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: October 2011# Knowledge tweets: October 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for September - October 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

,
15:54 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: October 2011# Knowledge tweets: October 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for September - October 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

,
15:54 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: October 2011# Knowledge tweets: October 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for September - October 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.


Tuesday 25 October 2011

15:16 GDTPermanent link to #The mess of Knowledge Management groups on LinkedIn# The mess of Knowledge Management groups on LinkedIn - Comments (0)

There is no shortage of Knowledge Management discussion groups on Linkedin. I posted a list of 35 of them back in February 2009 when that was all I could find. But in reading this post by Ian Wooler it looks like the number has grown dramatically. Here's Ian's summary:
  • 26 Alumni groups
  • 32 Corporate groups
  • 20 Conference groups
  • 132 Networking groups
  • 16 Nonprofit groups
  • 196 Professional groups.
Nick Milton points out that this is a total of 422 groups and comments "What a mess!" And explains why in an earlier post.

I am not so sure though that it could be any different unless some form of centralised control of the discussions was implemented which is not what the web is about. I also don't think that it would be a good thing.

Discusssion is naturally fragmented and messy. Exerting control over it, even if possible, would diminish creativity, freedom of expression and diversity.

Maybe we need a better balance between mess and order? But if so, who would define and agree it and how would it be achieved?

What are your thoughts?
,
15:16 GDTPermanent link to #The mess of Knowledge Management groups on LinkedIn# The mess of Knowledge Management groups on LinkedIn - Comments (0)

There is no shortage of Knowledge Management discussion groups on Linkedin. I posted a list of 35 of them back in February 2009 when that was all I could find. But in reading this post by Ian Wooler it looks like the number has grown dramatically. Here's Ian's summary:
  • 26 Alumni groups
  • 32 Corporate groups
  • 20 Conference groups
  • 132 Networking groups
  • 16 Nonprofit groups
  • 196 Professional groups.
Nick Milton points out that this is a total of 422 groups and comments "What a mess!" And explains why in an earlier post.

I am not so sure though that it could be any different unless some form of centralised control of the discussions was implemented which is not what the web is about. I also don't think that it would be a good thing.

Discusssion is naturally fragmented and messy. Exerting control over it, even if possible, would diminish creativity, freedom of expression and diversity.

Maybe we need a better balance between mess and order? But if so, who would define and agree it and how would it be achieved?

What are your thoughts?
,
15:16 GDTPermanent link to #The mess of Knowledge Management groups on LinkedIn# The mess of Knowledge Management groups on LinkedIn - Comments (0)

There is no shortage of Knowledge Management discussion groups on Linkedin. I posted a list of 35 of them back in February 2009 when that was all I could find. But in reading this post by Ian Wooler it looks like the number has grown dramatically. Here's Ian's summary:
  • 26 Alumni groups
  • 32 Corporate groups
  • 20 Conference groups
  • 132 Networking groups
  • 16 Nonprofit groups
  • 196 Professional groups.
Nick Milton points out that this is a total of 422 groups and comments "What a mess!" And explains why in an earlier post.

I am not so sure though that it could be any different unless some form of centralised control of the discussions was implemented which is not what the web is about. I also don't think that it would be a good thing.

Discusssion is naturally fragmented and messy. Exerting control over it, even if possible, would diminish creativity, freedom of expression and diversity.

Maybe we need a better balance between mess and order? But if so, who would define and agree it and how would it be achieved?

What are your thoughts?

Tuesday 25 October 2011

12:43 GDTPermanent link to #Flip Teaching and Flip Conferences# Flip Teaching and Flip Conferences - Comments (0)

I've known about a new way of teaching for some time now. It's called "flip teaching", "reverse teaching" or "reverse instruction." The idea is simple:
  • Kids watch lectures and videos at home.
  • Class is for hands-on work and face-to-face interaction with teachers and peers.
Although this style of teaching does not seem to be without its problems, I love the idea. This is just what I and others have been saying about conferences and seminars.

But why did I not make the connection before today? Conferences are just a hang over from school days. Sit the students in nice neat rows in a classroom and talk at them!
  • Speech is a bad medium for communicating information - so watch lectures and videos at home.
  • Speech is a good medium for dialogue - so do hands-on work and face-to-face interaction with teacher/peers at school and speaker/peers at a conference.
Its such a simple but powerful way of working. Don't just flip teaching, flip conferences as well. I will leave you with favourite quotation of mine.
The mind is not a vessel to be filled but a fire to be kindled.


,
12:43 GDTPermanent link to #Flip Teaching and Flip Conferences# Flip Teaching and Flip Conferences - Comments (0)

I've known about a new way of teaching for some time now. It's called "flip teaching", "reverse teaching" or "reverse instruction." The idea is simple:
  • Kids watch lectures and videos at home.
  • Class is for hands-on work and face-to-face interaction with teachers and peers.
Although this style of teaching does not seem to be without its problems, I love the idea. This is just what I and others have been saying about conferences and seminars.

But why did I not make the connection before today? Conferences are just a hang over from school days. Sit the students in nice neat rows in a classroom and talk at them!
  • Speech is a bad medium for communicating information - so watch lectures and videos at home.
  • Speech is a good medium for dialogue - so do hands-on work and face-to-face interaction with teacher/peers at school and speaker/peers at a conference.
Its such a simple but powerful way of working. Don't just flip teaching, flip conferences as well. I will leave you with favourite quotation of mine.
The mind is not a vessel to be filled but a fire to be kindled.


,
12:43 GDTPermanent link to #Flip Teaching and Flip Conferences# Flip Teaching and Flip Conferences - Comments (0)

I've known about a new way of teaching for some time now. It's called "flip teaching", "reverse teaching" or "reverse instruction." The idea is simple:
  • Kids watch lectures and videos at home.
  • Class is for hands-on work and face-to-face interaction with teachers and peers.
Although this style of teaching does not seem to be without its problems, I love the idea. This is just what I and others have been saying about conferences and seminars.

But why did I not make the connection before today? Conferences are just a hang over from school days. Sit the students in nice neat rows in a classroom and talk at them!
  • Speech is a bad medium for communicating information - so watch lectures and videos at home.
  • Speech is a good medium for dialogue - so do hands-on work and face-to-face interaction with teacher/peers at school and speaker/peers at a conference.
Its such a simple but powerful way of working. Don't just flip teaching, flip conferences as well. I will leave you with favourite quotation of mine.
The mind is not a vessel to be filled but a fire to be kindled.


,
12:43 GDTPermanent link to #Flip Teaching and Flip Conferences# Flip Teaching and Flip Conferences - Comments (0)

I've known about a new way of teaching for some time now. It's called "flip teaching", "reverse teaching" or "reverse instruction." The idea is simple:
  • Kids watch lectures and videos at home.
  • Class is for hands-on work and face-to-face interaction with teachers and peers.
Although this style of teaching does not seem to be without its problems, I love the idea. This is just what I and others have been saying about conferences and seminars.

But why did I not make the connection before today? Conferences are just a hang over from school days. Sit the students in nice neat rows in a classroom and talk at them!
  • Speech is a bad medium for communicating information - so watch lectures and videos at home.
  • Speech is a good medium for dialogue - so do hands-on work and face-to-face interaction with teacher/peers at school and speaker/peers at a conference.
Its such a simple but powerful way of working. Don't just flip teaching, flip conferences as well. I will leave you with favourite quotation of mine.
The mind is not a vessel to be filled but a fire to be kindled.


,
12:43 GDTPermanent link to #Flip Teaching and Flip Conferences# Flip Teaching and Flip Conferences - Comments (0)

I've known about a new way of teaching for some time now. It's called "flip teaching", "reverse teaching" or "reverse instruction." The idea is simple:
  • Kids watch lectures and videos at home.
  • Class is for hands-on work and face-to-face interaction with teachers and peers.
Although this style of teaching does not seem to be without its problems, I love the idea. This is just what I and others have been saying about conferences and seminars.

But why did I not make the connection before today? Conferences are just a hang over from school days. Sit the students in nice neat rows in a classroom and talk at them!
  • Speech is a bad medium for communicating information - so watch lectures and videos at home.
  • Speech is a good medium for dialogue - so do hands-on work and face-to-face interaction with teacher/peers at school and speaker/peers at a conference.
Its such a simple but powerful way of working. Don't just flip teaching, flip conferences as well. I will leave you with favourite quotation of mine.
The mind is not a vessel to be filled but a fire to be kindled.



Tuesday 4 October 2011

14:59 GDTPermanent link to #Conferences use valuable face-to-face time for worthless presentations by people who are not particularly entertaining# Conferences use valuable face-to-face time for worthless presentations by people who are not particularly entertaining - Comments (0)

I recently made the point Dont give talks - hold conversations, so was deligehted to have since discovered a blog post How to Run a Good Conference from Aaron Swartz from 2002 where he says:

The problems with conferences come down to three things:
  1. Speech is a bad medium for communicating information. 
  2. Speech is a good medium for dialog. 
  3. Get smart people and encourage them to talk.
He also makes the point that conferences get things backwards.

"They use valuable face-to-face time for worthless presentations by people who are not particularly entertaining and even if they were are saying things you already know, and then try and stifle discussion (one question per person, sir!) and shunt it off towards lunch or something (we don’t have time for questions now). Hello? What did all these people come out here for? I can watch infomercials at home just fine, thanks."

Exactly! Many conferences are becoming more conversational in their format. But what is the percentage that are still dreary death-by-powerpoint talks? I have no idea but putting a finger in the air, I would say about 95%, maybe higher.

When are conference organisers going to learn?

Monday 3 October 2011

20:14 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the October 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the October 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

Every so often, I come across a story that I feel compelled to share.
Almost 300 Indian girls known officially as "Unwanted" have traded their birth names for a fresh start in life. Given names like "Nakusa" or "Nakushi" - or "unwanted" in Hindi - they grew up understanding they were a burden in families that preferred boys in Maharashtra state.

What an amazing story. What wonderful girls. I think we are going to see more and more stories like this. People taking charge of their lives. There is a lot wrong with this world but more and more people are working to make it better.

A big thanks to Nerida Hart for posting this story on her Facebook wall via a post on the Facebook Girl Effect page. I have written about the Girl Effect in the past. Here is a snippet of what they have to say "when adolescent girls in the developing world have a chance, they can be the most powerful force of change for themselves, their families, communities, countries, and even the planet." Take a look.

Thursday 29 September 2011

09:18 GDTPermanent link to #The easiest success measurement tool is a simple question# The easiest success measurement tool is a simple question - Comments (0)

The easiest success measurement tool is a simple question. What did you do today to move forward?

The easiest project plan on earth is also a simple question. What will you do tomorrow to move forward?

At the end of each day, document your success and design your next move.



Ties in quite nicely with Snowden's view on KM.

Knowledge Management should be focused on real, tangible intractable problems not aspirational goals. It should deal pragmatically with the evolutionary possibilities of the present rather then seeking idealistic solutions.

Credit: Dave Snowden

,
09:18 GDTPermanent link to #The easiest success measurement tool is a simple question# The easiest success measurement tool is a simple question - Comments (0)

The easiest success measurement tool is a simple question. What did you do today to move forward?

The easiest project plan on earth is also a simple question. What will you do tomorrow to move forward?

At the end of each day, document your success and design your next move.



Ties in quite nicely with Snowden's view on KM.

Knowledge Management should be focused on real, tangible intractable problems not aspirational goals. It should deal pragmatically with the evolutionary possibilities of the present rather then seeking idealistic solutions.

Credit: Dave Snowden


Tuesday 27 September 2011

14:26 GDTPermanent link to #My recent Knowledge Cafe workshop in London (September 2011)# My recent Knowledge Cafe workshop in London (September 2011) - Comments (0)

On September 13th at the RSA in London I ran one of my Knowledge Cafe workshops.

I have run dozens of these workshops around the world these last few years, most recently in Edinburgh and Copenhagen and always have tremendous feedback.

This one was no exception and it was made special in that my eldest daughter Lauren came along ... so now when people ask her what her Dad does ... she can do a little better then say "he travels the world having conversations with people" :-)

I had 21 people in total, most of them had paid the full price but I had given a few discounts and one or two freebies to people who were keen to take part but could not afford the full price.

I have posted an album of photos from the day on Facebook if you are interested. As you can see ... lots of great conversation taking place.

My good friend David Pottinger also blogged about the day in Rethinking The Benefits Of Conversation In Business and he is one of the people interviewed below. Sophie Smiles also posted an item No agenda. More quality conversation.

And my daughter Lauren shot a few short video clips where she asked people what they were taking away from the day.

The very first short clip with Megan Morys is a rather special one for me. In my workshops, I have long suggested that many meetings would be better broken into two meetings separated by at least a week. The first meeting would take the form of a knowledge cafe where the sole purpose was to explore and better understand the issue at hand. It should not be about making a decision or coming to consensus. And it should be about dialogue and not debate.

The second meeting would then focus on making the decision. This can and would be more adversarial and more debate-like format with often the manager who has convened the meeting making the final decision. This to my mind, overcomes the complications faced when you try to do both in the same meeting. The people who wish to explore the issue get shouted down and the people who want to make a quick decision and often have already made up their minds tend to win the day. Often a bad decision is made and the people put down come away feeling not listened to and demoralised.

Personally, I have always respected that a decision has to be made and that I may not like it. What I have always hated is not to have had my say.

Megan is the fist person to have told me that as a manager this is just what she does. Listen to what she has to say :-)

Video Playlist: Gurteen Knowledge Cafe Workshop Interviews



This is a series of short interviews shot at various Gurteen Knowledge Cafes or Knowledge Cafe workshops where participants share something that they are taking away from the day.

Media Information: Image

I am running another Knowledge Cafe workshop in London on December 13th. if you like what you hear above then come along.
,
14:26 GDTPermanent link to #My recent Knowledge Cafe workshop in London (September 2011)# My recent Knowledge Cafe workshop in London (September 2011) - Comments (0)

On September 13th at the RSA in London I ran one of my Knowledge Cafe workshops.

I have run dozens of these workshops around the world these last few years, most recently in Edinburgh and Copenhagen and always have tremendous feedback.

This one was no exception and it was made special in that my eldest daughter Lauren came along ... so now when people ask her what her Dad does ... she can do a little better then say "he travels the world having conversations with people" :-)

I had 21 people in total, most of them had paid the full price but I had given a few discounts and one or two freebies to people who were keen to take part but could not afford the full price.

I have posted an album of photos from the day on Facebook if you are interested. As you can see ... lots of great conversation taking place.

My good friend David Pottinger also blogged about the day in Rethinking The Benefits Of Conversation In Business and he is one of the people interviewed below. Sophie Smiles also posted an item No agenda. More quality conversation.

And my daughter Lauren shot a few short video clips where she asked people what they were taking away from the day.

The very first short clip with Megan Morys is a rather special one for me. In my workshops, I have long suggested that many meetings would be better broken into two meetings separated by at least a week. The first meeting would take the form of a knowledge cafe where the sole purpose was to explore and better understand the issue at hand. It should not be about making a decision or coming to consensus. And it should be about dialogue and not debate.

The second meeting would then focus on making the decision. This can and would be more adversarial and more debate-like format with often the manager who has convened the meeting making the final decision. This to my mind, overcomes the complications faced when you try to do both in the same meeting. The people who wish to explore the issue get shouted down and the people who want to make a quick decision and often have already made up their minds tend to win the day. Often a bad decision is made and the people put down come away feeling not listened to and demoralised.

Personally, I have always respected that a decision has to be made and that I may not like it. What I have always hated is not to have had my say.

Megan is the fist person to have told me that as a manager this is just what she does. Listen to what she has to say :-)

Video Playlist: Gurteen Knowledge Cafe Workshop Interviews



This is a series of short interviews shot at various Gurteen Knowledge Cafes or Knowledge Cafe workshops where participants share something that they are taking away from the day.

Media Information: Image

I am running another Knowledge Cafe workshop in London on December 13th. if you like what you hear above then come along.
,
14:26 GDTPermanent link to #My recent Knowledge Cafe workshop in London (September 2011)# My recent Knowledge Cafe workshop in London (September 2011) - Comments (0)

On September 13th at the RSA in London I ran one of my Knowledge Cafe workshops.

I have run dozens of these workshops around the world these last few years, most recently in Edinburgh and Copenhagen and always have tremendous feedback.

This one was no exception and it was made special in that my eldest daughter Lauren came along ... so now when people ask her what her Dad does ... she can do a little better then say "he travels the world having conversations with people" :-)

I had 21 people in total, most of them had paid the full price but I had given a few discounts and one or two freebies to people who were keen to take part but could not afford the full price.

I have posted an album of photos from the day on Facebook if you are interested. As you can see ... lots of great conversation taking place.

My good friend David Pottinger also blogged about the day in Rethinking The Benefits Of Conversation In Business and he is one of the people interviewed below. Sophie Smiles also posted an item No agenda. More quality conversation.

And my daughter Lauren shot a few short video clips where she asked people what they were taking away from the day.

The very first short clip with Megan Morys is a rather special one for me. In my workshops, I have long suggested that many meetings would be better broken into two meetings separated by at least a week. The first meeting would take the form of a knowledge cafe where the sole purpose was to explore and better understand the issue at hand. It should not be about making a decision or coming to consensus. And it should be about dialogue and not debate.

The second meeting would then focus on making the decision. This can and would be more adversarial and more debate-like format with often the manager who has convened the meeting making the final decision. This to my mind, overcomes the complications faced when you try to do both in the same meeting. The people who wish to explore the issue get shouted down and the people who want to make a quick decision and often have already made up their minds tend to win the day. Often a bad decision is made and the people put down come away feeling not listened to and demoralised.

Personally, I have always respected that a decision has to be made and that I may not like it. What I have always hated is not to have had my say.

Megan is the fist person to have told me that as a manager this is just what she does. Listen to what she has to say :-)

Video Playlist: Gurteen Knowledge Cafe Workshop Interviews



This is a series of short interviews shot at various Gurteen Knowledge Cafes or Knowledge Cafe workshops where participants share something that they are taking away from the day.

Media Information: Image

I am running another Knowledge Cafe workshop in London on December 13th. if you like what you hear above then come along.
,
14:26 GDTPermanent link to #My recent Knowledge Cafe workshop in London (September 2011)# My recent Knowledge Cafe workshop in London (September 2011) - Comments (0)

On September 13th at the RSA in London I ran one of my Knowledge Cafe workshops.

I have run dozens of these workshops around the world these last few years, most recently in Edinburgh and Copenhagen and always have tremendous feedback.

This one was no exception and it was made special in that my eldest daughter Lauren came along ... so now when people ask her what her Dad does ... she can do a little better then say "he travels the world having conversations with people" :-)

I had 21 people in total, most of them had paid the full price but I had given a few discounts and one or two freebies to people who were keen to take part but could not afford the full price.

I have posted an album of photos from the day on Facebook if you are interested. As you can see ... lots of great conversation taking place.

My good friend David Pottinger also blogged about the day in Rethinking The Benefits Of Conversation In Business and he is one of the people interviewed below. Sophie Smiles also posted an item No agenda. More quality conversation.

And my daughter Lauren shot a few short video clips where she asked people what they were taking away from the day.

The very first short clip with Megan Morys is a rather special one for me. In my workshops, I have long suggested that many meetings would be better broken into two meetings separated by at least a week. The first meeting would take the form of a knowledge cafe where the sole purpose was to explore and better understand the issue at hand. It should not be about making a decision or coming to consensus. And it should be about dialogue and not debate.

The second meeting would then focus on making the decision. This can and would be more adversarial and more debate-like format with often the manager who has convened the meeting making the final decision. This to my mind, overcomes the complications faced when you try to do both in the same meeting. The people who wish to explore the issue get shouted down and the people who want to make a quick decision and often have already made up their minds tend to win the day. Often a bad decision is made and the people put down come away feeling not listened to and demoralised.

Personally, I have always respected that a decision has to be made and that I may not like it. What I have always hated is not to have had my say.

Megan is the fist person to have told me that as a manager this is just what she does. Listen to what she has to say :-)

Video Playlist: Gurteen Knowledge Cafe Workshop Interviews



This is a series of short interviews shot at various Gurteen Knowledge Cafes or Knowledge Cafe workshops where participants share something that they are taking away from the day.

Media Information: Image

I am running another Knowledge Cafe workshop in London on December 13th. if you like what you hear above then come along.

Tuesday 27 September 2011

11:00 GDTPermanent link to #Don Don't give talks - hold conversations - Comments (0)

I am often asked to give a talk to an organisation and where I have the freedom to, I do my best to transform it into a conversational format.

A few days ago I discovered that Google Video had lost a video of one such talk that I gave at the National Library in Singapore in 2007 and so I uploaded it again to YouTube and in watching it, I realised it was an excellent example of how I like do things.

The traditional way goes something like this:
  1. Give the talk with loads of Powerpoint slides and don't allow any questions during your talk as it can upset your rehearsed speech and someone may ask you a difficult question.
  2. Take questions at the end but don't leave too much time as again you may be asked a difficult one or no one has any questions for you as you put them all to sleep and they are dying to get back to the office.
  3. Leave quickly.
The way I prefer, goes more like this:
  1. Give the talk (some Powerpoint slides are OK) and take questions as you want the session to be engaging and interactive.
  2. At the end of your talk, ask the participants to have a conversation about the topic of the talk or ask them a specific question. This can either be a short conversation at their tables or a more fully Cafe like session where they change tables in order to have a broader conversation with more people.
  3. Ask them to form a circle with their chairs.
  4. Continue the conversation as a whole group and take more questions.
  5. Hang around over coffee and engage in more conversation.
Just browse my talk (unless you are interested in it of course) and you will get the idea of how it all hangs together. Note: the small group conversation starts at about 44:00 and the whole group conversation in a circle starts at about 59:00.

Video: Knowledge Sharing Talk at NLB, Singapore



Knowledge Sharing Talk and mini-knowledge cafe at NLB, Singapore, August 2007

Media Information: Image

Try this for yourself. You don't have to be a professional speaker. The format is simple. It is easy to do. You do need a little bit of confidence to try it but people really enjoy conversation and they will love you for it. You can't go too far wrong.

I am coaching someone at the moment who is a newly appointed head of a University department and they have been experimenting with the format. Not only are they enjoying introducing more conversation into their meetings but their members of staff are too.

Tuesday 27 September 2011

08:56 GDTPermanent link to #A conversation doesn A conversation doesn't just shuffle the deck of cards -- it creates new ones - Comments (0)

One of my recent newcomers to my London Knowledge Cafes is Andrew Armour. Andrew is one of those people who immediately "got" what the Cafes are all about and has delighted me in blogging about them and expressing elements of them in ways that I have never been able to articulate.

One of his first blog posts was On Cafe Conversations which I commented on a month or so back and more recently another Are You In The Conversation Business from which I have extracted the following:
A Knowledge Cafe tries to eliminate the traditional point scoring, that is such a feature of our everyday conversations. It is a notion that is neatly expressed by the brilliant Theodore Zeldin and his famous quote; "A conversation doesn't just shuffle the deck of cards -- it creates new ones".

The 'Cafe' format has been smartly honed by Gurteen as a way to encourage the making of those new cards by stimulating dialogue rather than monologue. In addressing the above questions, the various groups shifted the conversation from how you define good and bad outcomes, to discussing (in a sign of the times) -- how you engage in a conversation with looters. The idea was to explore and share knowledge.

I ended the evening with as many new puzzling questions as answers -- and as many new insights. But isn’t that the point of a good conversation? It leads you to a different view, adds insight and helps you play with 'a new card' rather than flip over that same one again and again and again. And if you are trying to innovate, to explore, to create something fresh -- isn’t that where your next conversation should start?

Like Andrew, I love Theodore's card metaphor. And just in case you missed it - listen to Theodore's recent interview on New Conversation on the BBC's Radio 4.
,
08:56 GDTPermanent link to #A conversation doesn A conversation doesn't just shuffle the deck of cards -- it creates new ones - Comments (0)

One of my recent newcomers to my London Knowledge Cafes is Andrew Armour. Andrew is one of those people who immediately "got" what the Cafes are all about and has delighted me in blogging about them and expressing elements of them in ways that I have never been able to articulate.

One of his first blog posts was On Cafe Conversations which I commented on a month or so back and more recently another Are You In The Conversation Business from which I have extracted the following:
A Knowledge Cafe tries to eliminate the traditional point scoring, that is such a feature of our everyday conversations. It is a notion that is neatly expressed by the brilliant Theodore Zeldin and his famous quote; "A conversation doesn't just shuffle the deck of cards -- it creates new ones".

The 'Cafe' format has been smartly honed by Gurteen as a way to encourage the making of those new cards by stimulating dialogue rather than monologue. In addressing the above questions, the various groups shifted the conversation from how you define good and bad outcomes, to discussing (in a sign of the times) -- how you engage in a conversation with looters. The idea was to explore and share knowledge.

I ended the evening with as many new puzzling questions as answers -- and as many new insights. But isn’t that the point of a good conversation? It leads you to a different view, adds insight and helps you play with 'a new card' rather than flip over that same one again and again and again. And if you are trying to innovate, to explore, to create something fresh -- isn’t that where your next conversation should start?

Like Andrew, I love Theodore's card metaphor. And just in case you missed it - listen to Theodore's recent interview on New Conversation on the BBC's Radio 4.
,
08:56 GDTPermanent link to #A conversation doesn A conversation doesn't just shuffle the deck of cards -- it creates new ones - Comments (0)

One of my recent newcomers to my London Knowledge Cafes is Andrew Armour. Andrew is one of those people who immediately "got" what the Cafes are all about and has delighted me in blogging about them and expressing elements of them in ways that I have never been able to articulate.

One of his first blog posts was On Cafe Conversations which I commented on a month or so back and more recently another Are You In The Conversation Business from which I have extracted the following:
A Knowledge Cafe tries to eliminate the traditional point scoring, that is such a feature of our everyday conversations. It is a notion that is neatly expressed by the brilliant Theodore Zeldin and his famous quote; "A conversation doesn't just shuffle the deck of cards -- it creates new ones".

The 'Cafe' format has been smartly honed by Gurteen as a way to encourage the making of those new cards by stimulating dialogue rather than monologue. In addressing the above questions, the various groups shifted the conversation from how you define good and bad outcomes, to discussing (in a sign of the times) -- how you engage in a conversation with looters. The idea was to explore and share knowledge.

I ended the evening with as many new puzzling questions as answers -- and as many new insights. But isn’t that the point of a good conversation? It leads you to a different view, adds insight and helps you play with 'a new card' rather than flip over that same one again and again and again. And if you are trying to innovate, to explore, to create something fresh -- isn’t that where your next conversation should start?

Like Andrew, I love Theodore's card metaphor. And just in case you missed it - listen to Theodore's recent interview on New Conversation on the BBC's Radio 4.

Monday 26 September 2011

18:49 GDTPermanent link to #Five quotations that represent my values# Five quotations that represent my values - Comments (0)

I love quotations. I tend to remember them and they help me focus on what is important to me and inspire and motivate me. Some people try to identify their core values. I try to identify the quotations that most represent who I am or wish to be. Here are probably my top five. They change slightly every time I draw up the list :-)

We must become the change we want to see in the world.


To be a catalyst is the ambition most appropriate for those who see the world as being in constant change, and who, without thinking that they can control it, wish to influence its direction.


I have to tell it again and again: I have no doctrine. I only point out something. I point out reality, I point out something in reality which has not or too little been seen. I take him who listens to me at his hand and lead him to the window. I push open the window and point outside. I have no doctrine, I carry on a dialogue.

Credit: Martin Buber

Children do not need to be made to learn to be better, told what to do or shown how. If they are given access to enough of the world, they will see clearly enough what things are truly important to themselves and to others, and they will make for themselves a better path into that world then anyone else could make for them.

Credit: John Holt

Suppose we were able to share meanings freely without a compulsive urge to impose our view or conform to those of others and without distortion and self-deception. Would this not constitute a real revolution in culture.

Credit: David Bohm

You will find over 900 quotations on my website. I have selected them carefully over the last 20 years or so and each means something to me. I hope you enjoy them too.

What quotations best represent who you are or what you would like to be?

Monday 26 September 2011

10:26 GDTPermanent link to #Conversation in the wild# Conversation in the wild - Comments (0)

In my knowledge cafes and workshops, a frequent question asked is "what is a conversation". Surprisingly, people cannot agree. Many think an exchange of emails, even SMS messages can be classed as conversations. I disagree.

Browsing the dictionary definitions on the web, conversation clearly involves talking. It is an oral, spoken activity, not a written one

Here is a definition from the Merrian-Webster dictionary: "an oral exchange of sentiments, observations, opinions, or ideas"

And another from the Macmillan dictionary: "an informal interchange of thoughts, information, etc., by spoken words; oral communication between persons; talk; colloquy"

The key words here are oral, exchange and informal.

So you can have a conversation, face to face, on the phone or via a video link. Anything else such as email, a written letter, or an exchange of IM or SMS messages are not conversations.

I would also add that conversation is highly interactive and takes place in real time - so an exchange of voice messages is also not a conversation.

To my mind, the best conversations are face to face, you need to be able to sense other people in their totality; their dress, their body language, their habits, their perfume or cologne; you need to be able to reach out and touch them even. This you cannot do over the phone or even a video link.

If you want a real human experience it must be literally face to face; body to body. That's the way conversation evolved, long before writing technology, its what us human beings are good at

It's conversation as it exists in the wild.
,
10:26 GDTPermanent link to #Conversation in the wild# Conversation in the wild - Comments (0)

In my knowledge cafes and workshops, a frequent question asked is "what is a conversation". Surprisingly, people cannot agree. Many think an exchange of emails, even SMS messages can be classed as conversations. I disagree.

Browsing the dictionary definitions on the web, conversation clearly involves talking. It is an oral, spoken activity, not a written one

Here is a definition from the Merrian-Webster dictionary: "an oral exchange of sentiments, observations, opinions, or ideas"

And another from the Macmillan dictionary: "an informal interchange of thoughts, information, etc., by spoken words; oral communication between persons; talk; colloquy"

The key words here are oral, exchange and informal.

So you can have a conversation, face to face, on the phone or via a video link. Anything else such as email, a written letter, or an exchange of IM or SMS messages are not conversations.

I would also add that conversation is highly interactive and takes place in real time - so an exchange of voice messages is also not a conversation.

To my mind, the best conversations are face to face, you need to be able to sense other people in their totality; their dress, their body language, their habits, their perfume or cologne; you need to be able to reach out and touch them even. This you cannot do over the phone or even a video link.

If you want a real human experience it must be literally face to face; body to body. That's the way conversation evolved, long before writing technology, its what us human beings are good at

It's conversation as it exists in the wild.
,
10:26 GDTPermanent link to #Conversation in the wild# Conversation in the wild - Comments (0)

In my knowledge cafes and workshops, a frequent question asked is "what is a conversation". Surprisingly, people cannot agree. Many think an exchange of emails, even SMS messages can be classed as conversations. I disagree.

Browsing the dictionary definitions on the web, conversation clearly involves talking. It is an oral, spoken activity, not a written one

Here is a definition from the Merrian-Webster dictionary: "an oral exchange of sentiments, observations, opinions, or ideas"

And another from the Macmillan dictionary: "an informal interchange of thoughts, information, etc., by spoken words; oral communication between persons; talk; colloquy"

The key words here are oral, exchange and informal.

So you can have a conversation, face to face, on the phone or via a video link. Anything else such as email, a written letter, or an exchange of IM or SMS messages are not conversations.

I would also add that conversation is highly interactive and takes place in real time - so an exchange of voice messages is also not a conversation.

To my mind, the best conversations are face to face, you need to be able to sense other people in their totality; their dress, their body language, their habits, their perfume or cologne; you need to be able to reach out and touch them even. This you cannot do over the phone or even a video link.

If you want a real human experience it must be literally face to face; body to body. That's the way conversation evolved, long before writing technology, its what us human beings are good at

It's conversation as it exists in the wild.
,
10:26 GDTPermanent link to #Conversation in the wild# Conversation in the wild - Comments (0)

In my knowledge cafes and workshops, a frequent question asked is "what is a conversation". Surprisingly, people cannot agree. Many think an exchange of emails, even SMS messages can be classed as conversations. I disagree.

Browsing the dictionary definitions on the web, conversation clearly involves talking. It is an oral, spoken activity, not a written one

Here is a definition from the Merrian-Webster dictionary: "an oral exchange of sentiments, observations, opinions, or ideas"

And another from the Macmillan dictionary: "an informal interchange of thoughts, information, etc., by spoken words; oral communication between persons; talk; colloquy"

The key words here are oral, exchange and informal.

So you can have a conversation, face to face, on the phone or via a video link. Anything else such as email, a written letter, or an exchange of IM or SMS messages are not conversations.

I would also add that conversation is highly interactive and takes place in real time - so an exchange of voice messages is also not a conversation.

To my mind, the best conversations are face to face, you need to be able to sense other people in their totality; their dress, their body language, their habits, their perfume or cologne; you need to be able to reach out and touch them even. This you cannot do over the phone or even a video link.

If you want a real human experience it must be literally face to face; body to body. That's the way conversation evolved, long before writing technology, its what us human beings are good at

It's conversation as it exists in the wild.

Monday 26 September 2011

09:37 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: September 2011# Knowledge tweets: September 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for August - September 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

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09:37 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: September 2011# Knowledge tweets: September 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for August - September 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

,
09:37 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: September 2011# Knowledge tweets: September 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for August - September 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.


Monday 26 September 2011

09:01 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the September 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the September 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

I would estimate that over 90% of all my professional news comes to me via RSS feeds that I subscribe to and read via Google Reader, primarily on my iPhone. Its how I keep in touch with a rapidly changing world.

I could not imagine being without this source of information and it still surprises me how many people I speak to who do not understand RSS and how valuable it could be to them.

RSS is simple. See this RSS page on my website that describes it in simple terms and includes two short animations "RSS in Plain English" and "Google Reader in Plain English".

Then see my RSS Feeds page for a list of all the RSS feeds that I generate and include website updates, jobs, events, photos, videos and more.

Finally, take a look at the blog rolls of the RSS feeds to which I subscribe.

You can subscribe to any feed on an y of these two lists yourself. Enjoy :-)

Sunday 28 August 2011

23:00 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the August 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the August 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

The big news this month is of course the resignation of Steve Jobs. I am a PC boy though I do love my iPhone and am increasingly tempted to convert and buy a MacBook Air. I am not too sure that what I have read about Steve Jobs that I would have liked to work for him. But I hugely admire what he has achieved and I think there is so much we can all learn from him. You may recall I blogged his hugely inspiring Stanford Commencement Speech a while back.

Now Euan Semple, in a recent blog post has pointed me to a quote of his that I love:
We think the Mac will sell zillions, but we didn't build the Mac for anybody else. We built it for ourselves. We were the group of people who were going to judge whether it was great or not. We weren't going to go out and do market research. We just wanted to build the best thing we could build.

When you're a carpenter making a beautiful chest of drawers, you're not going to use a piece of plywood on the back, even though it faces the wall and nobody will ever see it. You'll know it's there, so you're going to use a beautiful piece of wood on the back. For you to sleep well at night, the aesthetic, the quality, has to be carried all the way through.

Just take a look at the back of any PC laptop and compare it with a Mac laptop. I have never been able to figure out whey other manufacturers have not followed suit. My daughter has a Mac laptop and I often just pick it up to admire it and to feel it. Its a delight just to hold it in my hands.

If only all businesses took design so seriously. I am sure extra investment would pay off handsomely.
,
23:00 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the August 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the August 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

The big news this month is of course the resignation of Steve Jobs. I am a PC boy though I do love my iPhone and am increasingly tempted to convert and buy a MacBook Air. I am not too sure that what I have read about Steve Jobs that I would have liked to work for him. But I hugely admire what he has achieved and I think there is so much we can all learn from him. You may recall I blogged his hugely inspiring Stanford Commencement Speech a while back.

Now Euan Semple, in a recent blog post has pointed me to a quote of his that I love:
We think the Mac will sell zillions, but we didn't build the Mac for anybody else. We built it for ourselves. We were the group of people who were going to judge whether it was great or not. We weren't going to go out and do market research. We just wanted to build the best thing we could build.

When you're a carpenter making a beautiful chest of drawers, you're not going to use a piece of plywood on the back, even though it faces the wall and nobody will ever see it. You'll know it's there, so you're going to use a beautiful piece of wood on the back. For you to sleep well at night, the aesthetic, the quality, has to be carried all the way through.

Just take a look at the back of any PC laptop and compare it with a Mac laptop. I have never been able to figure out whey other manufacturers have not followed suit. My daughter has a Mac laptop and I often just pick it up to admire it and to feel it. Its a delight just to hold it in my hands.

If only all businesses took design so seriously. I am sure extra investment would pay off handsomely.

Sunday 28 August 2011

20:39 GDTPermanent link to #We need to think about saving ourselves# We need to think about saving ourselves - Comments (0)

I would like to introduce you to two bloggers whom you may find interesting to follow. I started following their blog posts some years ago when they were more focused on KM. Today, many of their posts are seemingly of a different nature. I'll warn you now, you may not agree with what they have to say, they may even anger you. But they have some interesting perspectives on the state of the world and our future.

Rob, has got me thinking about food and diet and the effect on our health of the huge quantities of processed foods that we now eat and that we may be being advised wrongly. He has influenced me to try the Paleo Diet. I have lost 15 lbs (7kgs) in about 2 months (another 15 lbs to go) and I feel much better for it.

Dave, on the other hand, has prompted me to start to think more deeply about the sustainability of our way of life and the global economy. In the UK for example, we are possibly only Nine Meals from Anarchy. Some people see Dave's posts as being negative and defeatist as he believes that we cannot avoid the collapse of our global civilisation during this century and that we need to prepare and adapt for it.

No one is good at predicting the future, Dave may be right, he may be wrong. You don't have to like or agree with what Dave is saying but you should read his posts (they are long) and think about it for yourself.

The one thing is certain. We cannot go on as we are much longer. Even if things don't totally collapse, we are entering a period of great turmoil and change. We all need to start to think about it and plan for it as best we can.

I started off by saying both these gentleman started out blogging about KM. To my mind, they still are. We have so much information and knowledge about what is going on our world but the challenge is to make sense of it all and to make better decisions. This is the essence of KM. So Rob's and Dave's blog posts are not too surprising.
,
20:39 GDTPermanent link to #We need to think about saving ourselves# We need to think about saving ourselves - Comments (0)

I would like to introduce you to two bloggers whom you may find interesting to follow. I started following their blog posts some years ago when they were more focused on KM. Today, many of their posts are seemingly of a different nature. I'll warn you now, you may not agree with what they have to say, they may even anger you. But they have some interesting perspectives on the state of the world and our future.

Rob, has got me thinking about food and diet and the effect on our health of the huge quantities of processed foods that we now eat and that we may be being advised wrongly. He has influenced me to try the Paleo Diet. I have lost 15 lbs (7kgs) in about 2 months (another 15 lbs to go) and I feel much better for it.

Dave, on the other hand, has prompted me to start to think more deeply about the sustainability of our way of life and the global economy. In the UK for example, we are possibly only Nine Meals from Anarchy. Some people see Dave's posts as being negative and defeatist as he believes that we cannot avoid the collapse of our global civilisation during this century and that we need to prepare and adapt for it.

No one is good at predicting the future, Dave may be right, he may be wrong. You don't have to like or agree with what Dave is saying but you should read his posts (they are long) and think about it for yourself.

The one thing is certain. We cannot go on as we are much longer. Even if things don't totally collapse, we are entering a period of great turmoil and change. We all need to start to think about it and plan for it as best we can.

I started off by saying both these gentleman started out blogging about KM. To my mind, they still are. We have so much information and knowledge about what is going on our world but the challenge is to make sense of it all and to make better decisions. This is the essence of KM. So Rob's and Dave's blog posts are not too surprising.

Sunday 28 August 2011

20:21 GDTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Services# Gurteen Knowledge Community Services - Comments (0)

I provide a wide range of services to members of the Gurteen Knowledge Community.

You may subscribe to a number of RSS feeds
http://www.gurteen.com/gurteen/gurteen.nsf/id/rss-feeds

You may also subscribe to a number of e-mail based services

Quote of the Day
Receive a quotation by e-mail on a day of the week of your choosing
http://www.gurteen.com/gurteen/gurteen.nsf/id/quotations

Job Alerts
Receive e-mail alerts for jobs in your region
http://www.gurteen.com/gurteen/gurteen.nsf/id/jobs

Event Alerts
Receive e-mail alerts for new conferences & workshops in your region
http://www.gurteen.com/gurteen/gurteen.nsf/id/events

Book Alerts
Receive e-mail alerts for recently published books
http://www.gurteen.com/gurteen/gurteen.nsf/id/books

Email Courses
Subscribe to short e-mail courses by e-mail
http://www.gurteen.com/gurteen/gurteen.nsf/id/email-courses

Downloads
Download interesting articles from my web site
http://www.gurteen.com/gurteen/gurteen.nsf/id/downloads

and much more. I hope you find it all useful.

Sunday 28 August 2011

19:49 GDTPermanent link to #The best prediction for children The best prediction for children's choice of behaviour is the actions of other children around them - Comments (0)

I recently stumbled on this snippet on Peer Influence from John Tropea.
1928 Study by Hugh Hartshorne and Mark May

Experimental situation in which 10-13 year old had the choice to yield to the possibility of cheating and stealing, or to be honest and considerate of their peers. The study showed that children were not consistently honest or dishonest (the idea that honesty would be a fixed trait of character by this age). The best prediction for the children's choice of behaviour was the actions of the other children around them.

We are all children. We are all social creatures. This research reflects so much on all our behaviours. Some thoughts come to mind:
  1. To what extent do these research findings reflect on the behaviour of the people in the recent England riots?
  2. In a KM context, is it surprising that people are not more collaborative or sharing, if their peers are not?
  3. This research took place in 1928 and I believe has been replicated many times since. It even seems that children learn most from their peers and not their parents.
  4. To what extent is this research true? And what we learnt from it?

,
19:49 GDTPermanent link to #The best prediction for children The best prediction for children's choice of behaviour is the actions of other children around them - Comments (0)

I recently stumbled on this snippet on Peer Influence from John Tropea.
1928 Study by Hugh Hartshorne and Mark May

Experimental situation in which 10-13 year old had the choice to yield to the possibility of cheating and stealing, or to be honest and considerate of their peers. The study showed that children were not consistently honest or dishonest (the idea that honesty would be a fixed trait of character by this age). The best prediction for the children's choice of behaviour was the actions of the other children around them.

We are all children. We are all social creatures. This research reflects so much on all our behaviours. Some thoughts come to mind:
  1. To what extent do these research findings reflect on the behaviour of the people in the recent England riots?
  2. In a KM context, is it surprising that people are not more collaborative or sharing, if their peers are not?
  3. This research took place in 1928 and I believe has been replicated many times since. It even seems that children learn most from their peers and not their parents.
  4. To what extent is this research true? And what we learnt from it?

,
19:49 GDTPermanent link to #The best prediction for children The best prediction for children's choice of behaviour is the actions of other children around them - Comments (0)

I recently stumbled on this snippet on Peer Influence from John Tropea.
1928 Study by Hugh Hartshorne and Mark May

Experimental situation in which 10-13 year old had the choice to yield to the possibility of cheating and stealing, or to be honest and considerate of their peers. The study showed that children were not consistently honest or dishonest (the idea that honesty would be a fixed trait of character by this age). The best prediction for the children's choice of behaviour was the actions of the other children around them.

We are all children. We are all social creatures. This research reflects so much on all our behaviours. Some thoughts come to mind:
  1. To what extent do these research findings reflect on the behaviour of the people in the recent England riots?
  2. In a KM context, is it surprising that people are not more collaborative or sharing, if their peers are not?
  3. This research took place in 1928 and I believe has been replicated many times since. It even seems that children learn most from their peers and not their parents.
  4. To what extent is this research true? And what we learnt from it?

,
19:49 GDTPermanent link to #The best prediction for children The best prediction for children's choice of behaviour is the actions of other children around them - Comments (0)

I recently stumbled on this snippet on Peer Influence from John Tropea.
1928 Study by Hugh Hartshorne and Mark May

Experimental situation in which 10-13 year old had the choice to yield to the possibility of cheating and stealing, or to be honest and considerate of their peers. The study showed that children were not consistently honest or dishonest (the idea that honesty would be a fixed trait of character by this age). The best prediction for the children's choice of behaviour was the actions of the other children around them.

We are all children. We are all social creatures. This research reflects so much on all our behaviours. Some thoughts come to mind:
  1. To what extent do these research findings reflect on the behaviour of the people in the recent England riots?
  2. In a KM context, is it surprising that people are not more collaborative or sharing, if their peers are not?
  3. This research took place in 1928 and I believe has been replicated many times since. It even seems that children learn most from their peers and not their parents.
  4. To what extent is this research true? And what we learnt from it?


Sunday 28 August 2011

19:48 GDTPermanent link to #Never assume# Never assume - Comments (0)

This is what Nick Rowney says in the "About Me" section of his blog.
I don't say things to be liked I say them because I BELIEVE them.

Reputation isn't about being liked, it comes from standing for something.

My whole life has been about interacting with people from all walks of life and it has taught me NEVER to assume.

Credit: Nick Rowney
This resonated with me as one thing that is high on my list of "lessons learnt in life" is never, ever, ever, assume things about anything or anyone. Its all too easy to jump to conclusions as to why someone has said something or done something. Most of the time we are wrong. Very wrong.

To me this is where conversation or dialogue plays its part in understanding issues and people. Rather than say - "that was a stupid move" or "that was a stupid thing to say". Its far more creative and revealing to say "that's interesting, so why did you do that?" or "that's interesting, why did you say that?" It also potentially saves a relationship.

But you need to do it out of genuine curiosity not as some cheap conversational technique.

Sunday 28 August 2011

14:07 GDTPermanent link to #Conversation down the pub with Theodore Zeldin# Conversation down the pub with Theodore Zeldin - Comments (0)

I am great fan of Theodore Zeldin as many of you will know but there is precious little video of him and his website The Oxford Muse has been broken for some time or at best a bit of a mess which is a huge shame.

But I just came across a great little video interview with him where is questioned about the results of the Courage Beer Conversations Survey..


Video: Theodore Zeldin discusses the results of the Courage Beer Conversations Survey.



Philosopher and historian Theodore Zeldin discusses the results of the Courage Beer Conversations Survey.

Media Information: Image


It resonates well with my thinking about my Knowledge Cafes where one of the key principles is to come as close to a pub conversation as possible (though of course without the beer).
,
14:07 GDTPermanent link to #Conversation down the pub with Theodore Zeldin# Conversation down the pub with Theodore Zeldin - Comments (0)

I am great fan of Theodore Zeldin as many of you will know but there is precious little video of him and his website The Oxford Muse has been broken for some time or at best a bit of a mess which is a huge shame.

But I just came across a great little video interview with him where is questioned about the results of the Courage Beer Conversations Survey..


Video: Theodore Zeldin discusses the results of the Courage Beer Conversations Survey.



Philosopher and historian Theodore Zeldin discusses the results of the Courage Beer Conversations Survey.

Media Information: Image


It resonates well with my thinking about my Knowledge Cafes where one of the key principles is to come as close to a pub conversation as possible (though of course without the beer).

Thursday 25 August 2011

14:43 GDTPermanent link to #There are only business strategies# There are only business strategies - Comments (0)

I recently tripped over this blog post Adapting to Life in Perpetual Beta from Harold Jarche.

In his seven point list, the first two points are as follows:
  1. There is no such thing as a social media strategy.
  2. There are only business strategies that understand networks.
This jumped out at me, as it is the same the advice I give about KM. I wrote the following a little while back:
There are NO KM initiatives. There is no such thing as a KM project. You don't do KM. There is no such thing as a KM strategy. There are only business problems, challenges and opportunities; business strategies and business projects.

The problem with KM initiatives and strategies is that they conceptualize the problem and make it far too easy to take your eye off the business. It is, to my mind, one of the key reasons why so many KM projects fail.

It is rare that a project is purely a KM one. You usually need more than just KM tools and techniques to fully address a business problem or opportunity.

You use KM tools and methodologies to respond to business problems.

If you must have a KM strategy it should be in response to a clear business objective and tie in to the top level business objectives of the organization or organizational unit. The business purpose and outcomes should come first!

Adapting Harold's words "There are only business strategies that understand the nature and value of knowledge."
,
14:43 GDTPermanent link to #There are only business strategies# There are only business strategies - Comments (0)

I recently tripped over this blog post Adapting to Life in Perpetual Beta from Harold Jarche.

In his seven point list, the first two points are as follows:
  1. There is no such thing as a social media strategy.
  2. There are only business strategies that understand networks.
This jumped out at me, as it is the same the advice I give about KM. I wrote the following a little while back:
There are NO KM initiatives. There is no such thing as a KM project. You don't do KM. There is no such thing as a KM strategy. There are only business problems, challenges and opportunities; business strategies and business projects.

The problem with KM initiatives and strategies is that they conceptualize the problem and make it far too easy to take your eye off the business. It is, to my mind, one of the key reasons why so many KM projects fail.

It is rare that a project is purely a KM one. You usually need more than just KM tools and techniques to fully address a business problem or opportunity.

You use KM tools and methodologies to respond to business problems.

If you must have a KM strategy it should be in response to a clear business objective and tie in to the top level business objectives of the organization or organizational unit. The business purpose and outcomes should come first!

Adapting Harold's words "There are only business strategies that understand the nature and value of knowledge."

Wednesday 24 August 2011

14:34 GDTPermanent link to #Your brain is where you hide secrets# Your brain is where you hide secrets - Comments (0)

I like this post Social is for sharing, not hiding from Jeff Jarvis about all the fuss on privacy and social media. I think his view is good one. He summarises by paraphrasing Eric Schmidt:
If you want to hide something, the worst place to do that is on a social network. That’s where you share. Your brain is where you hide secrets.

Credit: Jeff Jarvis
There is no absolute security or privacy on the web as whole, not just social media. Anything you really don't want people to know about then don't put it on the web.
,
14:34 GDTPermanent link to #Your brain is where you hide secrets# Your brain is where you hide secrets - Comments (0)

I like this post Social is for sharing, not hiding from Jeff Jarvis about all the fuss on privacy and social media. I think his view is good one. He summarises by paraphrasing Eric Schmidt:
If you want to hide something, the worst place to do that is on a social network. That’s where you share. Your brain is where you hide secrets.

Credit: Jeff Jarvis
There is no absolute security or privacy on the web as whole, not just social media. Anything you really don't want people to know about then don't put it on the web.

Tuesday 23 August 2011

16:46 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: August 2011# Knowledge tweets: August 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for July - August 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
  • Book: Knowledge Management (01 Aug 2011) by Kevin C Desouza, Scott Paquette http://t.co/NddtKA2
    2011-08-23 10:36:21 UTC

  • The need for rational, reasonable drug laws has never been more pressing. http://t.co/uFfz07U #SocialGood
    2011-08-23 07:26:28 UTC

  • Book Review of Kate Pugh’s Sharing Hidden Know-How from @billives http://t.co/MPT6Uda #KM
    2011-08-22 11:34:33 UTC

  • A nice overview of my recent London Knowledge Cafe at PwC from @NicolaFranklin http://t.co/cwN4xiw #KCAFE #KM
    2011-08-22 09:51:50 UTC

  • Best prediction for children’s choice of behaviour was the actions of the other children around them http://t.co/6ZY4oy5
    2011-08-21 08:08:10 UTC

  • The Terrible Cost Of Patents http://t.co/08L3bsq
    2011-08-20 12:25:53 UTC

  • “Reclaim Blogging”: Why I’m giving up Twitter and Facebook. | @gapingvoid http://t.co/UtsOkm3
    2011-08-19 19:39:38 UTC

  • 12 Incredible Internet Activists Changing the World Through Social Media http://t.co/KZNGulb #SocialGood
    2011-08-19 19:30:13 UTC

  • Listening to some one’s story is a way of empowering them http://t.co/SyIUQOo #GoodToTalk
    2011-08-19 19:18:41 UTC

  • It's rare to find a consistently creative or insightful person who is also an angry person. http://t.co/LLzIWDU
    2011-08-19 10:32:38 UTC

  • The time to push hard is when you’re hurting like crazy and you want to give up http://t.co/0gOLw7n
    2011-08-19 10:30:10 UTC

  • Books create semblance of knowledge but true knowledge can only be created through active discourse + dialogue.http://t.co/AcVECyE #KM
    2011-08-19 07:11:45 UTC

  • Ideas just aren’t what they used to be. http://t.co/9uzeXua #KM /interesting
    2011-08-17 09:04:53 UTC

  • RT @Yunus_Centre: #Socialbusiness is missing link between businessworld + fight against #poverty + social problems http://j.mp/bjewbJ
    2011-08-10 10:21:23 UTC

  • KM. When will we admit that we’re getting it wrong? http://linkd.in/o3Jt6q #KM
    2011-08-10 08:30:40 UTC

  • Responding to the apparent collapse of an old world under its own weight. http://bit.ly/nICl1D /by @euan
    2011-08-10 08:10:07 UTC

  • RT @RobinGood: Social Content Curation – A Shift from the Traditional | @scoopit http://bit.ly/nc3qnS #curation
    2011-08-08 07:20:57 UTC

  • RT @KMskunkworks: The problem with 'certified' KM training http://wp.me/pUfyy-6x #KCube #KMObservatory
    2011-08-07 12:29:36 UTC

  • Content Curation Is Listening and Engaging http://bit.ly/ocG6Xb #curation
    2011-08-04 16:26:16 UTC

  • Creating participatory conferences - challenging the assumptions http://bit.ly/pTR4um
    2011-08-04 09:56:51 UTC

  • De Bono's Six Hats Explained http://bit.ly/oU1Iyx #KM
    2011-08-04 08:55:40 UTC


,
16:46 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: August 2011# Knowledge tweets: August 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for July - August 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
  • Book: Knowledge Management (01 Aug 2011) by Kevin C Desouza, Scott Paquette http://t.co/NddtKA2
    2011-08-23 10:36:21 UTC

  • The need for rational, reasonable drug laws has never been more pressing. http://t.co/uFfz07U #SocialGood
    2011-08-23 07:26:28 UTC

  • Book Review of Kate Pugh’s Sharing Hidden Know-How from @billives http://t.co/MPT6Uda #KM
    2011-08-22 11:34:33 UTC

  • A nice overview of my recent London Knowledge Cafe at PwC from @NicolaFranklin http://t.co/cwN4xiw #KCAFE #KM
    2011-08-22 09:51:50 UTC

  • Best prediction for children’s choice of behaviour was the actions of the other children around them http://t.co/6ZY4oy5
    2011-08-21 08:08:10 UTC

  • The Terrible Cost Of Patents http://t.co/08L3bsq
    2011-08-20 12:25:53 UTC

  • “Reclaim Blogging”: Why I’m giving up Twitter and Facebook. | @gapingvoid http://t.co/UtsOkm3
    2011-08-19 19:39:38 UTC

  • 12 Incredible Internet Activists Changing the World Through Social Media http://t.co/KZNGulb #SocialGood
    2011-08-19 19:30:13 UTC

  • Listening to some one’s story is a way of empowering them http://t.co/SyIUQOo #GoodToTalk
    2011-08-19 19:18:41 UTC

  • It's rare to find a consistently creative or insightful person who is also an angry person. http://t.co/LLzIWDU
    2011-08-19 10:32:38 UTC

  • The time to push hard is when you’re hurting like crazy and you want to give up http://t.co/0gOLw7n
    2011-08-19 10:30:10 UTC

  • Books create semblance of knowledge but true knowledge can only be created through active discourse + dialogue.http://t.co/AcVECyE #KM
    2011-08-19 07:11:45 UTC

  • Ideas just aren’t what they used to be. http://t.co/9uzeXua #KM /interesting
    2011-08-17 09:04:53 UTC

  • RT @Yunus_Centre: #Socialbusiness is missing link between businessworld + fight against #poverty + social problems http://j.mp/bjewbJ
    2011-08-10 10:21:23 UTC

  • KM. When will we admit that we’re getting it wrong? http://linkd.in/o3Jt6q #KM
    2011-08-10 08:30:40 UTC

  • Responding to the apparent collapse of an old world under its own weight. http://bit.ly/nICl1D /by @euan
    2011-08-10 08:10:07 UTC

  • RT @RobinGood: Social Content Curation – A Shift from the Traditional | @scoopit http://bit.ly/nc3qnS #curation
    2011-08-08 07:20:57 UTC

  • RT @KMskunkworks: The problem with 'certified' KM training http://wp.me/pUfyy-6x #KCube #KMObservatory
    2011-08-07 12:29:36 UTC

  • Content Curation Is Listening and Engaging http://bit.ly/ocG6Xb #curation
    2011-08-04 16:26:16 UTC

  • Creating participatory conferences - challenging the assumptions http://bit.ly/pTR4um
    2011-08-04 09:56:51 UTC

  • De Bono's Six Hats Explained http://bit.ly/oU1Iyx #KM
    2011-08-04 08:55:40 UTC


,
16:46 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: August 2011# Knowledge tweets: August 2011 - Comments (0)

Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for July - August 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
  • Book: Knowledge Management (01 Aug 2011) by Kevin C Desouza, Scott Paquette http://t.co/NddtKA2
    2011-08-23 10:36:21 UTC

  • The need for rational, reasonable drug laws has never been more pressing. http://t.co/uFfz07U #SocialGood
    2011-08-23 07:26:28 UTC

  • Book Review of Kate Pugh’s Sharing Hidden Know-How from @billives http://t.co/MPT6Uda #KM
    2011-08-22 11:34:33 UTC

  • A nice overview of my recent London Knowledge Cafe at PwC from @NicolaFranklin http://t.co/cwN4xiw #KCAFE #KM
    2011-08-22 09:51:50 UTC

  • Best prediction for children’s choice of behaviour was the actions of the other children around them http://t.co/6ZY4oy5
    2011-08-21 08:08:10 UTC

  • The Terrible Cost Of Patents http://t.co/08L3bsq
    2011-08-20 12:25:53 UTC

  • “Reclaim Blogging”: Why I’m giving up Twitter and Facebook. | @gapingvoid http://t.co/UtsOkm3
    2011-08-19 19:39:38 UTC

  • 12 Incredible Internet Activists Changing the World Through Social Media http://t.co/KZNGulb #SocialGood
    2011-08-19 19:30:13 UTC

  • Listening to some one’s story is a way of empowering them http://t.co/SyIUQOo #GoodToTalk
    2011-08-19 19:18:41 UTC

  • It's rare to find a consistently creative or insightful person who is also an angry person. http://t.co/LLzIWDU
    2011-08-19 10:32:38 UTC

  • The time to push hard is when you’re hurting like crazy and you want to give up http://t.co/0gOLw7n
    2011-08-19 10:30:10 UTC

  • Books create semblance of knowledge but true knowledge can only be created through active discourse + dialogue.http://t.co/AcVECyE #KM
    2011-08-19 07:11:45 UTC

  • Ideas just aren’t what they used to be. http://t.co/9uzeXua #KM /interesting
    2011-08-17 09:04:53 UTC

  • RT @Yunus_Centre: #Socialbusiness is missing link between businessworld + fight against #poverty + social problems http://j.mp/bjewbJ
    2011-08-10 10:21:23 UTC

  • KM. When will we admit that we’re getting it wrong? http://linkd.in/o3Jt6q #KM
    2011-08-10 08:30:40 UTC

  • Responding to the apparent collapse of an old world under its own weight. http://bit.ly/nICl1D /by @euan
    2011-08-10 08:10:07 UTC

  • RT @RobinGood: Social Content Curation – A Shift from the Traditional | @scoopit http://bit.ly/nc3qnS #curation
    2011-08-08 07:20:57 UTC

  • RT @KMskunkworks: The problem with 'certified' KM training http://wp.me/pUfyy-6x #KCube #KMObservatory
    2011-08-07 12:29:36 UTC

  • Content Curation Is Listening and Engaging http://bit.ly/ocG6Xb #curation
    2011-08-04 16:26:16 UTC

  • Creating participatory conferences - challenging the assumptions http://bit.ly/pTR4um
    2011-08-04 09:56:51 UTC

  • De Bono's Six Hats Explained http://bit.ly/oU1Iyx #KM
    2011-08-04 08:55:40 UTC



Tuesday 23 August 2011

10:37 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the July 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the July 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

The major news of the month has been the beta release of Google+. I managed to get an early invite and have been playing with it for some time now. I won't attempt to explain it or review it ... a thousand others have done a much better job than I could ever do. Here is what Techcrunch has to say and here is a guide from Mashup.

I like Google+ a great deal, even though I still don't think I have quite my mind wrapped around how circles work. Its certainly a more complex but more powerful model than Twitter or Facebook. Unlike Wave or Buzz, I think Google+ will be a big success. It does not replace Facebook or Twitter or blogs or discussion groups though its functionality overlaps with them all. I will still be using all these social tools.

My main challenge will be figuring out which tool to use for what. I tweet a lot and have things configured such that my manual tweets and automated tweets from my website (via RSS feeds) get pushed through to LinkedIn and Facebook.

So how does Google+ fit into all of this? Does it make sense to feed my tweets into Google+ as well? Or should I feed my Google+ posts into Twitter? Or neither?

There are a number of emergent tools to do this type of thing but I have yet to get my head around them and figure out which works best for me. One thing I do like though is the ability to create an RSS feed for my Google+ public posts.

I will let you know how I get on and I am sure I will meet many of you in Google+. Here is my Google+ profile page.

I gather that Google+ will go fully live at end of July but if you would like an invite drop me an email and I will invite you.
,
10:37 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the July 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the July 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

The major news of the month has been the beta release of Google+. I managed to get an early invite and have been playing with it for some time now. I won't attempt to explain it or review it ... a thousand others have done a much better job than I could ever do. Here is what Techcrunch has to say and here is a guide from Mashup.

I like Google+ a great deal, even though I still don't think I have quite my mind wrapped around how circles work. Its certainly a more complex but more powerful model than Twitter or Facebook. Unlike Wave or Buzz, I think Google+ will be a big success. It does not replace Facebook or Twitter or blogs or discussion groups though its functionality overlaps with them all. I will still be using all these social tools.

My main challenge will be figuring out which tool to use for what. I tweet a lot and have things configured such that my manual tweets and automated tweets from my website (via RSS feeds) get pushed through to LinkedIn and Facebook.

So how does Google+ fit into all of this? Does it make sense to feed my tweets into Google+ as well? Or should I feed my Google+ posts into Twitter? Or neither?

There are a number of emergent tools to do this type of thing but I have yet to get my head around them and figure out which works best for me. One thing I do like though is the ability to create an RSS feed for my Google+ public posts.

I will let you know how I get on and I am sure I will meet many of you in Google+. Here is my Google+ profile page.

I gather that Google+ will go fully live at end of July but if you would like an invite drop me an email and I will invite you.

Friday 12 August 2011

09:35 GDTPermanent link to #Politicians are not quite so stupid!# Politicians are not quite so stupid! - Comments (0)

Why, when politicians say something that really makes no sense, do people automatically think they are stupid?

Politicians rarely say what they believe or know to be true.

They say what needs to be said to win favour with the public; to keep rival politicians off their back and to stay in office.

By the same logic, don't judge their intelligence or true beliefs by what they do! Though it is a better measure.

That's the nature of politics.

But don't take this argument too far ... some really are stupid :-)

This though, is a more general problem, we rarely stop to look behind the words that other people utter. We don't look for the underlying meaning. We take their words at face value. Now who is being stupid? :-)

Wednesday 27 July 2011

14:42 GDTPermanent link to #Implementing Knowledge Cafes for business purpose# Implementing Knowledge Cafes for business purpose - Comments (0)

Over the last few years I have run a large number of Knowledge Cafe workshops all over the world but always in partnership with another organisation but on September 13 at the RSA in central London, I will be running one entirely organised by myself. Its a good six weeks away and I already have six people signed up, so things are looking good.

If you have experienced one of my Cafes and would like to learn how to run them yourself or you are curious how then can be put to good business purpose then take a look here where you can learn more an register for the event.

Wednesday 27 July 2011

14:01 GDTPermanent link to #Some notes from KM Australia# Some notes from KM Australia - Comments (0)

I chaired KM Australia last week though on reflection, I don't like that old fashioned word "chaired". Lets say I facilitated it.

I did not sit on stage. I briefly introduced the speakers. I did not read out their full bios. I kept them to time as best I could. I did not give lengthy summaries after their talks - that time was better given over to conversation. And I encouraged, supported and facilitated conversation and Q&A around their talks.

I really enjoyed the conference and felt the conversational format worked well and from the feedback I have seen so far the conference participants (note I try not to use the word audience) did too.

Some great tweeting went on and even some Google Plussing.

A few little things stood out for me. First, Peter Williams, CEO, of Deloitte Digital, during his talk said this about innovation : "Innovation is not about defining it, it's about doing it." This resonated strongly with my own view on KM. "KM is not about defining it or arguing whether it is dead or alive, its about doing it."

Second, what was interesting, in the conversations, someone made the point that we really needed to agree a common definition on KM if it was to have any future. Now, if you have been around KM as long as I have, you will know that agreeing a common definition is as far away as ever and may never be achieved. So I asked the conference participants what they thought. Overwhelmingly they thought it was not an issue. Thank God that I am not the only one who does not think this is a problem!

Thirdly, another conversation that stood out for me was one around the skills that we felt were needed today as knowledge workers. I noted down the items suggested. And then did a very rough and ready poll on the top three. This was the result:
  • leadership
  • influence
  • flexibility/adaptability

The ability to lead and the ability to influence. Interesting. Well worth reflecting on.

Finally, given all the challenges that Knowledge Management faces, I concluded the conference with my favourite quote from Ghandi.

We must become the change we wish to see in the world.

I enjoyed the conference so much, I must try to talk the Ark Group into inviting me again next year even though it rained almost all day, every day for the week I was in Sydney.

Wednesday 27 July 2011

11:18 GDTPermanent link to #Are conversation, appreciation and understanding innovation?# Are conversation, appreciation and understanding innovation? - Comments (0)

In this short video Bill Doty reflects on how the search for "big innovation" might keep us from making small acts each day to change the way we live and work.

Are conversation, appreciation and understanding innovation?

I have long believed this. Take a look at these video clips of an interview with me a year or two ago on Innovation.

What do you think?

Video: David Gurteen on when innovation should take place

David Gurteen on when innovation should take place from iriss on Vimeo.

David Gurteen discusses when innovation should take place



David Gurteen on when innovation should take place.

The Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services (IRISS), Glasgow.

Media Information: Image


,
11:18 GDTPermanent link to #Are conversation, appreciation and understanding innovation?# Are conversation, appreciation and understanding innovation? - Comments (0)

In this short video Bill Doty reflects on how the search for "big innovation" might keep us from making small acts each day to change the way we live and work.

Are conversation, appreciation and understanding innovation?

I have long believed this. Take a look at these video clips of an interview with me a year or two ago on Innovation.

What do you think?

Video: David Gurteen on when innovation should take place

David Gurteen on when innovation should take place from iriss on Vimeo.

David Gurteen discusses when innovation should take place



David Gurteen on when innovation should take place.

The Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services (IRISS), Glasgow.

Media Information: Image



Tuesday 26 July 2011

21:00 GDTPermanent link to #Video of Gurteen Knowledge Cafe at KM Egypt 2010# Video of Gurteen Knowledge Cafe at KM Egypt 2010 - Comments (0)

This video was taken at KM Egypt in September 2010 where I was invited to run a Knowledge Cafe.

It is probably one of the best videos that not only describes my Knowledge Cafes but where you also get to see it in action and hear some of the insights from the people taking part. Be warned though it is over 50 minutes in length.

Note: the room and the tables are not the ideal setting for a Knowledge Cafe nor is the reporting back process but often the Cafe needs to be adapted to fit the room and the number of participants.

Video: Knowledge Cafe at KM Egypt 2010



This video was taken at KM Egypt in September 2010 where I was invited to run a Knowledge Cafe.

It is probably one of the best videos that not only describes my Knowledge Cafes but where you also get to see it in action and hear some of the insights from the people taking part.

Note: the room and the tables are not the ideal setting for a Knowledge Cafe nor is the reporting back process but often the Cafe needs to be adapted to fit the room and the number of participants.

Media Information: Image



Tuesday 26 July 2011

19:42 GDTPermanent link to #When you think you control something, you When you think you control something, you're wrong. - Comments (0)

I like this post by Leo Babauta on the illusion of control. It recognises that in a complex world we cannot predict cause and effect. If something happens the same way twice its by chance not because of some underlying "cause and effect" logic. It also ties in with my mantra of stop doing things to people. And it ties in with Snowden's views on not focusing on outcomes but on impact.

Here are a few things that Leo suggests for a completely different way of living:
  • We stop setting goals, and instead do what excites us.
  • We stop planning, and just do.
  • We stop looking at the future, and live in the moment.
  • We stop trying to control others, and focus instead on being kind to them.
  • We learn that trusting our values is more important to taking action than desiring and striving for certain outcomes.
  • We take each step lightly, with balance, in the moment, guided by those values and what we're passionate about ... rather than trying to plan the next 1,000 steps and where we'll end up.
  • We learn to accept the world as it is, rather than being annoyed with it, stressed by it, mad at it, despaired by it, or trying to change it into what we want it to be.
  • We are never disappointed with how things turn out, because we never expected anything -- we just accept what comes.


  • I am drawn to this way of thinking but I struggle with it. I need to have some goals and to do some planning but not to be overly tied to those goals and my plans; to not be too hung up on the how, where or when.

    Dave Snowden sums it up nicely for me when he says this (my slight modifications):
    Knowledge Management We should be focused on real, tangible intractable problems not aspirational goals. It We should deal pragmatically with the evolutionary possibilities of the present rather then seeking idealistic solutions.

    Credit: Dave Snowden

    ,
    19:42 GDTPermanent link to #When you think you control something, you When you think you control something, you're wrong. - Comments (0)

    I like this post by Leo Babauta on the illusion of control. It recognises that in a complex world we cannot predict cause and effect. If something happens the same way twice its by chance not because of some underlying "cause and effect" logic. It also ties in with my mantra of stop doing things to people. And it ties in with Snowden's views on not focusing on outcomes but on impact.

    Here are a few things that Leo suggests for a completely different way of living:
  • We stop setting goals, and instead do what excites us.
  • We stop planning, and just do.
  • We stop looking at the future, and live in the moment.
  • We stop trying to control others, and focus instead on being kind to them.
  • We learn that trusting our values is more important to taking action than desiring and striving for certain outcomes.
  • We take each step lightly, with balance, in the moment, guided by those values and what we're passionate about ... rather than trying to plan the next 1,000 steps and where we'll end up.
  • We learn to accept the world as it is, rather than being annoyed with it, stressed by it, mad at it, despaired by it, or trying to change it into what we want it to be.
  • We are never disappointed with how things turn out, because we never expected anything -- we just accept what comes.


  • I am drawn to this way of thinking but I struggle with it. I need to have some goals and to do some planning but not to be overly tied to those goals and my plans; to not be too hung up on the how, where or when.

    Dave Snowden sums it up nicely for me when he says this (my slight modifications):
    Knowledge Management We should be focused on real, tangible intractable problems not aspirational goals. It We should deal pragmatically with the evolutionary possibilities of the present rather then seeking idealistic solutions.

    Credit: Dave Snowden


    Tuesday 26 July 2011

    19:00 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: July 2011# Knowledge tweets: July 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for May - July 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • The Master of Fine Arts is the new MBA. http://read.bi/rmlVuv
      2011-07-24 16:06:09 UTC

    • I don't think of work as work and play as play . It's all living. Richard Branson http://bit.ly/2MucTo
      2011-07-22 12:43:05 UTC

    • RT @TheE20Trap: Yammer or SharePoint? The Deloitte Experience #KMAUS http://trap.it/cALrRg #e20 #socbiz
      2011-07-21 14:50:58 UTC

    • If You Want to Kill Innovation, Reward It! Alfie Kohn http://bit.ly/1f2aZr
      2011-07-20 20:26:02 UTC

    • Is our civilization is in its final century, and is there is nothing we can do to prevent its collapse? http://bit.ly/rdWwT5
      2011-07-20 13:06:50 UTC

    • The ubiquitous piece of software can leave one feeling grumpy and passive and in no frame of mind for proper work http://on.ft.com/nxxKbb
      2011-07-18 12:50:46 UTC

    • RT @RobinGood: A must-watch presentation: Ten Technology Trends That Will Change the World http://slidesha.re/oslyNr
      2011-07-17 12:27:17 UTC

    • RT @johnniemoore: @DavidGurteen thanks for excellent link on Wired/Khan Academy. I blogged a few thoughts here http://bit.ly/oh4tPO
      2011-07-17 11:08:55 UTC

    • How Google+ Works http://bit.ly/rfTLzt
      2011-07-17 11:06:04 UTC

    • Google+: The Complete Guide http://on.mash.to/o5tOQb
      2011-07-17 08:28:44 UTC

    • The Future of Knowledge Management http://bit.ly/p9kWhg video talk from David Griffiths
      2011-07-16 14:54:21 UTC

    • What is a Knowledge Cafe? - David Gurteen video - a Prezi from @karentoittoit http://bit.ly/oa4uFl #KCafe #KM
      2011-07-16 14:37:54 UTC

    • The Knowledge Café to address a PowerPoint aversion http://bit.ly/no1etl #KM #KCafe
      2011-07-16 14:35:50 UTC

    • TED talks on Social Change http://bit.ly/mQFlic #SocialGood
      2011-07-16 14:32:31 UTC

    • Cats Against Climate Change http://bit.ly/nLy1oG #SocialGood
      2011-07-16 13:37:04 UTC

    • Weeding out students who look great on paper but haven't developed people or communications skills http://bit.ly/rsvdsu /via @andrewarmour
      2011-07-13 09:53:42 UTC

    • RT @Yunus_Centre: Yunus: social business will impact the world http://bit.ly/r3M4w2 #Social Good
      2011-07-13 07:31:41 UTC

    • What the catalysts are for “good” conversations http://bit.ly/nviRxq #GoodToTalk
      2011-07-12 07:24:07 UTC

    • You can experience emotional states without knowing why, even if you believe you can pinpoint the source. http://bit.ly/mYd0YA
      2011-07-12 07:14:32 UTC

    • Why 'Social Business'? http://bit.ly/rmfPRh /in the Yunus sense of SB #SocialGood
      2011-07-11 16:23:33 UTC

    • Using Social Tools to Open Up Conversations within the Enterprise http://bit.ly/pz2Cpr #GoodTotalk
      2011-07-11 07:38:19 UTC

    • The transformative power of conversation http://bit.ly/nUAw5Z from @kdelarue #GoodToTalk
      2011-07-10 10:07:47 UTC

    • Brainstorming - it is possible to have lots of ideas and for everyone of them to be fatuous http://bit.ly/nteUrG from @andrewarmour
      2011-07-10 09:27:08 UTC

    • RT @1cheerfulman: @DavidGurteen Our family has been looking after a child in Kenya; anyone can sign up here http://bit.ly/nRmXzn
      2011-07-10 09:08:53 UTC

    • Knowledge Cafes are about "letting people think out aloud and be who they are in a safe setting" http://linkd.in/roVuxR #KM #KCafe
      2011-07-10 09:04:43 UTC

    • In Uganda, American Becomes Foster Mom To 13 Girls http://n.pr/jU91Uv /another @maggiedoyne - we need more :-) #SocialGood
      2011-07-10 08:36:36 UTC

    • What does it mean that the sea is dying? That it is being killed, by us. http://bit.ly/o2tzfB
      2011-07-09 09:29:15 UTC

    • What would worldwide Balkanization and tribalization mean for globalization? from @davepollard http://bit.ly/onx8zx #EndOfEmpire
      2011-07-09 08:41:12 UTC

    • The Ideas sausage machine, or the ideas conversation? http://bit.ly/p6bYuS #KM #GoodTotalk
      2011-07-08 06:54:35 UTC

    • On Cafe Conversations, Connections & Collaboration by @AndrewArmour http://bit.ly/rrZqJx #KM #KCafe
      2011-07-07 10:19:34 UTC

    • A Thousand Days to Reinvent Capitalism? http://bit.ly/ojh110 #ReinventCapitalism
      2011-07-06 20:34:17 UTC

    • A Liquid Café is a hybrid of World Café and Open Space http://bit.ly/j1HVKP #KCafe
      2011-07-05 12:25:20 UTC

    • Forrester's Five Stages of Social Media Maturity http://bit.ly/kzqUqL
      2011-07-05 09:10:46 UTC


    ,
    19:00 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: July 2011# Knowledge tweets: July 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for May - July 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • The Master of Fine Arts is the new MBA. http://read.bi/rmlVuv
      2011-07-24 16:06:09 UTC

    • I don't think of work as work and play as play . It's all living. Richard Branson http://bit.ly/2MucTo
      2011-07-22 12:43:05 UTC

    • RT @TheE20Trap: Yammer or SharePoint? The Deloitte Experience #KMAUS http://trap.it/cALrRg #e20 #socbiz
      2011-07-21 14:50:58 UTC

    • If You Want to Kill Innovation, Reward It! Alfie Kohn http://bit.ly/1f2aZr
      2011-07-20 20:26:02 UTC

    • Is our civilization is in its final century, and is there is nothing we can do to prevent its collapse? http://bit.ly/rdWwT5
      2011-07-20 13:06:50 UTC

    • The ubiquitous piece of software can leave one feeling grumpy and passive and in no frame of mind for proper work http://on.ft.com/nxxKbb
      2011-07-18 12:50:46 UTC

    • RT @RobinGood: A must-watch presentation: Ten Technology Trends That Will Change the World http://slidesha.re/oslyNr
      2011-07-17 12:27:17 UTC

    • RT @johnniemoore: @DavidGurteen thanks for excellent link on Wired/Khan Academy. I blogged a few thoughts here http://bit.ly/oh4tPO
      2011-07-17 11:08:55 UTC

    • How Google+ Works http://bit.ly/rfTLzt
      2011-07-17 11:06:04 UTC

    • Google+: The Complete Guide http://on.mash.to/o5tOQb
      2011-07-17 08:28:44 UTC

    • The Future of Knowledge Management http://bit.ly/p9kWhg video talk from David Griffiths
      2011-07-16 14:54:21 UTC

    • What is a Knowledge Cafe? - David Gurteen video - a Prezi from @karentoittoit http://bit.ly/oa4uFl #KCafe #KM
      2011-07-16 14:37:54 UTC

    • The Knowledge Café to address a PowerPoint aversion http://bit.ly/no1etl #KM #KCafe
      2011-07-16 14:35:50 UTC

    • TED talks on Social Change http://bit.ly/mQFlic #SocialGood
      2011-07-16 14:32:31 UTC

    • Cats Against Climate Change http://bit.ly/nLy1oG #SocialGood
      2011-07-16 13:37:04 UTC

    • Weeding out students who look great on paper but haven't developed people or communications skills http://bit.ly/rsvdsu /via @andrewarmour
      2011-07-13 09:53:42 UTC

    • RT @Yunus_Centre: Yunus: social business will impact the world http://bit.ly/r3M4w2 #Social Good
      2011-07-13 07:31:41 UTC

    • What the catalysts are for “good” conversations http://bit.ly/nviRxq #GoodToTalk
      2011-07-12 07:24:07 UTC

    • You can experience emotional states without knowing why, even if you believe you can pinpoint the source. http://bit.ly/mYd0YA
      2011-07-12 07:14:32 UTC

    • Why 'Social Business'? http://bit.ly/rmfPRh /in the Yunus sense of SB #SocialGood
      2011-07-11 16:23:33 UTC

    • Using Social Tools to Open Up Conversations within the Enterprise http://bit.ly/pz2Cpr #GoodTotalk
      2011-07-11 07:38:19 UTC

    • The transformative power of conversation http://bit.ly/nUAw5Z from @kdelarue #GoodToTalk
      2011-07-10 10:07:47 UTC

    • Brainstorming - it is possible to have lots of ideas and for everyone of them to be fatuous http://bit.ly/nteUrG from @andrewarmour
      2011-07-10 09:27:08 UTC

    • RT @1cheerfulman: @DavidGurteen Our family has been looking after a child in Kenya; anyone can sign up here http://bit.ly/nRmXzn
      2011-07-10 09:08:53 UTC

    • Knowledge Cafes are about "letting people think out aloud and be who they are in a safe setting" http://linkd.in/roVuxR #KM #KCafe
      2011-07-10 09:04:43 UTC

    • In Uganda, American Becomes Foster Mom To 13 Girls http://n.pr/jU91Uv /another @maggiedoyne - we need more :-) #SocialGood
      2011-07-10 08:36:36 UTC

    • What does it mean that the sea is dying? That it is being killed, by us. http://bit.ly/o2tzfB
      2011-07-09 09:29:15 UTC

    • What would worldwide Balkanization and tribalization mean for globalization? from @davepollard http://bit.ly/onx8zx #EndOfEmpire
      2011-07-09 08:41:12 UTC

    • The Ideas sausage machine, or the ideas conversation? http://bit.ly/p6bYuS #KM #GoodTotalk
      2011-07-08 06:54:35 UTC

    • On Cafe Conversations, Connections & Collaboration by @AndrewArmour http://bit.ly/rrZqJx #KM #KCafe
      2011-07-07 10:19:34 UTC

    • A Thousand Days to Reinvent Capitalism? http://bit.ly/ojh110 #ReinventCapitalism
      2011-07-06 20:34:17 UTC

    • A Liquid Café is a hybrid of World Café and Open Space http://bit.ly/j1HVKP #KCafe
      2011-07-05 12:25:20 UTC

    • Forrester's Five Stages of Social Media Maturity http://bit.ly/kzqUqL
      2011-07-05 09:10:46 UTC


    ,
    19:00 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: July 2011# Knowledge tweets: July 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for May - July 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • The Master of Fine Arts is the new MBA. http://read.bi/rmlVuv
      2011-07-24 16:06:09 UTC

    • I don't think of work as work and play as play . It's all living. Richard Branson http://bit.ly/2MucTo
      2011-07-22 12:43:05 UTC

    • RT @TheE20Trap: Yammer or SharePoint? The Deloitte Experience #KMAUS http://trap.it/cALrRg #e20 #socbiz
      2011-07-21 14:50:58 UTC

    • If You Want to Kill Innovation, Reward It! Alfie Kohn http://bit.ly/1f2aZr
      2011-07-20 20:26:02 UTC

    • Is our civilization is in its final century, and is there is nothing we can do to prevent its collapse? http://bit.ly/rdWwT5
      2011-07-20 13:06:50 UTC

    • The ubiquitous piece of software can leave one feeling grumpy and passive and in no frame of mind for proper work http://on.ft.com/nxxKbb
      2011-07-18 12:50:46 UTC

    • RT @RobinGood: A must-watch presentation: Ten Technology Trends That Will Change the World http://slidesha.re/oslyNr
      2011-07-17 12:27:17 UTC

    • RT @johnniemoore: @DavidGurteen thanks for excellent link on Wired/Khan Academy. I blogged a few thoughts here http://bit.ly/oh4tPO
      2011-07-17 11:08:55 UTC

    • How Google+ Works http://bit.ly/rfTLzt
      2011-07-17 11:06:04 UTC

    • Google+: The Complete Guide http://on.mash.to/o5tOQb
      2011-07-17 08:28:44 UTC

    • The Future of Knowledge Management http://bit.ly/p9kWhg video talk from David Griffiths
      2011-07-16 14:54:21 UTC

    • What is a Knowledge Cafe? - David Gurteen video - a Prezi from @karentoittoit http://bit.ly/oa4uFl #KCafe #KM
      2011-07-16 14:37:54 UTC

    • The Knowledge Café to address a PowerPoint aversion http://bit.ly/no1etl #KM #KCafe
      2011-07-16 14:35:50 UTC

    • TED talks on Social Change http://bit.ly/mQFlic #SocialGood
      2011-07-16 14:32:31 UTC

    • Cats Against Climate Change http://bit.ly/nLy1oG #SocialGood
      2011-07-16 13:37:04 UTC

    • Weeding out students who look great on paper but haven't developed people or communications skills http://bit.ly/rsvdsu /via @andrewarmour
      2011-07-13 09:53:42 UTC

    • RT @Yunus_Centre: Yunus: social business will impact the world http://bit.ly/r3M4w2 #Social Good
      2011-07-13 07:31:41 UTC

    • What the catalysts are for “good” conversations http://bit.ly/nviRxq #GoodToTalk
      2011-07-12 07:24:07 UTC

    • You can experience emotional states without knowing why, even if you believe you can pinpoint the source. http://bit.ly/mYd0YA
      2011-07-12 07:14:32 UTC

    • Why 'Social Business'? http://bit.ly/rmfPRh /in the Yunus sense of SB #SocialGood
      2011-07-11 16:23:33 UTC

    • Using Social Tools to Open Up Conversations within the Enterprise http://bit.ly/pz2Cpr #GoodTotalk
      2011-07-11 07:38:19 UTC

    • The transformative power of conversation http://bit.ly/nUAw5Z from @kdelarue #GoodToTalk
      2011-07-10 10:07:47 UTC

    • Brainstorming - it is possible to have lots of ideas and for everyone of them to be fatuous http://bit.ly/nteUrG from @andrewarmour
      2011-07-10 09:27:08 UTC

    • RT @1cheerfulman: @DavidGurteen Our family has been looking after a child in Kenya; anyone can sign up here http://bit.ly/nRmXzn
      2011-07-10 09:08:53 UTC

    • Knowledge Cafes are about "letting people think out aloud and be who they are in a safe setting" http://linkd.in/roVuxR #KM #KCafe
      2011-07-10 09:04:43 UTC

    • In Uganda, American Becomes Foster Mom To 13 Girls http://n.pr/jU91Uv /another @maggiedoyne - we need more :-) #SocialGood
      2011-07-10 08:36:36 UTC

    • What does it mean that the sea is dying? That it is being killed, by us. http://bit.ly/o2tzfB
      2011-07-09 09:29:15 UTC

    • What would worldwide Balkanization and tribalization mean for globalization? from @davepollard http://bit.ly/onx8zx #EndOfEmpire
      2011-07-09 08:41:12 UTC

    • The Ideas sausage machine, or the ideas conversation? http://bit.ly/p6bYuS #KM #GoodTotalk
      2011-07-08 06:54:35 UTC

    • On Cafe Conversations, Connections & Collaboration by @AndrewArmour http://bit.ly/rrZqJx #KM #KCafe
      2011-07-07 10:19:34 UTC

    • A Thousand Days to Reinvent Capitalism? http://bit.ly/ojh110 #ReinventCapitalism
      2011-07-06 20:34:17 UTC

    • A Liquid Café is a hybrid of World Café and Open Space http://bit.ly/j1HVKP #KCafe
      2011-07-05 12:25:20 UTC

    • Forrester's Five Stages of Social Media Maturity http://bit.ly/kzqUqL
      2011-07-05 09:10:46 UTC



    Monday 25 July 2011

    17:03 GDTPermanent link to #Video of Gurteen Knowledge Cafe, National Australia Bank, Melbourne, October 2010# Video of Gurteen Knowledge Cafe, National Australia Bank, Melbourne, October 2010 - Comments (0)

    This is short video of a Knowledge Cafe that I ran for the National Australia Bank in Melbourne, Australia in October 2010.

    The session was captured on a flip cam without the use of a roving mic, so the sound is not clear and has had some extensive editing to fit into a short learning piece, but it gives a good idea of what the Cafe is all about.


    Video: Gurteen Knowledge Cafe, NAB, Melbourne, October 2010



    This is a short video of a Gurteen Knowledge Cafe that I facilitated for Peter Houlihan at the National Australia Bank in Melbourne in October 2010.

    The session was captured on a flip cam without the use of a roving mic, so the sound is not clear and has had some extensive editing to fit into a short learning piece, but it gives a good idea of what the Cafe is all about. 

    The question posed to the group as the "conversational seed" was "What if true leadership involves embracing complexity by widening the circle of involvement rather than restricting it?

    Media Information: Image



    Monday 25 July 2011

    16:49 GDTPermanent link to #Demystifying Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)# Demystifying Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) - Comments (0)

    I have never been a big fan of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as I feel too often it is nothing more than a form of greenwashing.

    On the other hand, many companies do take their social responsibility seriously, so maybe I should not be too sceptical.

    What prompted me to comment on CSR? Well this guide on the subject How to profit using corporate social responsibility from Jim Craig - an old friend and colleague from my Lotus Development days. Request your free copy if you wish to learn more.
    ,
    16:49 GDTPermanent link to #Demystifying Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)# Demystifying Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) - Comments (0)

    I have never been a big fan of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as I feel too often it is nothing more than a form of greenwashing.

    On the other hand, many companies do take their social responsibility seriously, so maybe I should not be too sceptical.

    What prompted me to comment on CSR? Well this guide on the subject How to profit using corporate social responsibility from Jim Craig - an old friend and colleague from my Lotus Development days. Request your free copy if you wish to learn more.
    ,
    16:49 GDTPermanent link to #Demystifying Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)# Demystifying Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) - Comments (0)

    I have never been a big fan of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as I feel too often it is nothing more than a form of greenwashing.

    On the other hand, many companies do take their social responsibility seriously, so maybe I should not be too sceptical.

    What prompted me to comment on CSR? Well this guide on the subject How to profit using corporate social responsibility from Jim Craig - an old friend and colleague from my Lotus Development days. Request your free copy if you wish to learn more.
    ,
    16:49 GDTPermanent link to #Demystifying Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)# Demystifying Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) - Comments (0)

    I have never been a big fan of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as I feel too often it is nothing more than a form of greenwashing.

    On the other hand, many companies do take their social responsibility seriously, so maybe I should not be too sceptical.

    What prompted me to comment on CSR? Well this guide on the subject How to profit using corporate social responsibility from Jim Craig - an old friend and colleague from my Lotus Development days. Request your free copy if you wish to learn more.

    Monday 25 July 2011

    09:57 GDTPermanent link to #If you are a scientist, you make predictions# If you are a scientist, you make predictions - Comments (0)

    This is a really good idea from Seth Godin.

    Scientists make predictions, and predicting the future is far more valuable than explaining the past.

    Credit: Seth Godin
    "If you are a scientist, you make predictions!"

    You might call this a form of personal knowledge management.

    I'll make two public predictions. Over the next twenty years:
    • KM will not die.
    • The KM name will not change.

    What are your predictions? Will Google+ be a success or failure? Will the world economic system avoid collapse during the next 20 years?

    Sunday 17 July 2011

    11:41 GDTPermanent link to #On Cafe Conversations; Connections and Collaboration# On Cafe Conversations; Connections and Collaboration - Comments (0)

    Earlier this month I ran one of my London Knowledge Cafes that was mainly aimed at people who had not experienced one before. EC Harris were the host and 40 people participated. I have posted the photos to Facebook

    The Cafes always go well, people love free flowing conversation but occasionally one or two people in the group really do not "get it" -- they want the session to be more controlled with agendas and summarisation and outcomes. But this is just what the Cafe is not about!

    On the other hand, every so often one person really "gets it" and sees through the simplicity of the process and recognises its power. In this Cafe, Andrew Armour was one of those people, this is an excerpt of a blog post he wrote after the event.
    Fortunately, the session lacked squeaky marker pens and there were thankfully no mind maps, lumps of blu-tak and the divvying up of tasks.

    Gurteen's Knowledge Cafe concept is a smarter, quicker and potentially far more productive way to encourage creative discussion. Like other good things, from espresso to the first Porsche -- its success is based on functional simplicity and speed.

    Take a question, divide into groups, discuss the question, then move into a new group and keep the conversation going -- sharing and discussing as you go. Unlike the traditionally tortured brainstorming (notoriously ineffective, see my blog post on this) -- and the dreaded 'group planning away day' workshops -- the aim of the Cafe is not to appoint group leaders, debate and create instant solutions.

    But rather to promote a conversation, explore the ideas and share the knowledge. It's not a pitch, debate, negotiation or a challenge. Neither a platform, seminar or lecture from senior management. Nor a soap box or stage for show offs.

    After 60 minutes of speedy, varied conversation across groups and tables everyone stands in a circle to quickly share the new insights and thoughts they've gained.

    With business life often dominated by jargon, complexity and often jumbled communication the direct and focused approach of the Cafe is a refreshing change.

    It's a short, sharp Arabica compared to a tepid mug of Nescafe. It blends the human art of conversation with the science of business thinking.

    And it works. How so?

    Firstly, it's very hard for one person to dominate because the group composition continually changes. The lack of agenda and pressure to develop a unified solution prevents closed thinking.

    And as a bonus, it raises a few laughs as well -- which cannot be a bad thing. The cafe technique highlighted to me the importance of a collaborative dialogue in partnership development and marketing innovation.

    We know that connections and relationships are at the heart of creative thinking and commercial innovation (see my previous blogs discussing Matt Ridley and Stephen Johnson etc.)

    But a smart business connection will not evolve into a true collaboration without a conversation and dialogue.

    Unfortunately, many brands and organisations are often dominated by strong individuals driven by their own agendas, an over confidence and need to shine and win in the spotlight.

    The "not invented here" thinking is symptomatic of this -- its more monologue, than dialogue. A conversational approach is different.


    Thank you Andrew, I could not have put that any better myself. This is the heart of what my Cafe process is all about.

    Saturday 25 June 2011

    12:57 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    It's been a great month for my Knowledge Cafes. I have run two masterclasses. The first was in Edinburgh on 7th June and the second in Copenhagen on 14th June.

    I have long taken photos at almost all my Knowledge Cafes and Masterclasses and posted them to Flickr but I am now increasingly posting them to Facebook also as here people can tag themselves and each other making the whole event far more social. I also love it as I get to remember people's names and faces.

    Here are the Edinburgh photos and here the ones from Copenhagen.

    And here is a little video montage of the Copenhagen event though I am the only one speaking in English and not Danish.



    I have also run two Knowledge Cafes, the first for Cabinet Office and Number 10 Downing Street staff as part of their "Better Cabinet Office Week" and the second at KM UK 2011.

    Slowly but surely, interest is growing in the vital role of conversation in business.
    ,
    12:57 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    It's been a great month for my Knowledge Cafes. I have run two masterclasses. The first was in Edinburgh on 7th June and the second in Copenhagen on 14th June.

    I have long taken photos at almost all my Knowledge Cafes and Masterclasses and posted them to Flickr but I am now increasingly posting them to Facebook also as here people can tag themselves and each other making the whole event far more social. I also love it as I get to remember people's names and faces.

    Here are the Edinburgh photos and here the ones from Copenhagen.

    And here is a little video montage of the Copenhagen event though I am the only one speaking in English and not Danish.



    I have also run two Knowledge Cafes, the first for Cabinet Office and Number 10 Downing Street staff as part of their "Better Cabinet Office Week" and the second at KM UK 2011.

    Slowly but surely, interest is growing in the vital role of conversation in business.
    ,
    12:57 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    It's been a great month for my Knowledge Cafes. I have run two masterclasses. The first was in Edinburgh on 7th June and the second in Copenhagen on 14th June.

    I have long taken photos at almost all my Knowledge Cafes and Masterclasses and posted them to Flickr but I am now increasingly posting them to Facebook also as here people can tag themselves and each other making the whole event far more social. I also love it as I get to remember people's names and faces.

    Here are the Edinburgh photos and here the ones from Copenhagen.

    And here is a little video montage of the Copenhagen event though I am the only one speaking in English and not Danish.



    I have also run two Knowledge Cafes, the first for Cabinet Office and Number 10 Downing Street staff as part of their "Better Cabinet Office Week" and the second at KM UK 2011.

    Slowly but surely, interest is growing in the vital role of conversation in business.
    ,
    12:57 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    It's been a great month for my Knowledge Cafes. I have run two masterclasses. The first was in Edinburgh on 7th June and the second in Copenhagen on 14th June.

    I have long taken photos at almost all my Knowledge Cafes and Masterclasses and posted them to Flickr but I am now increasingly posting them to Facebook also as here people can tag themselves and each other making the whole event far more social. I also love it as I get to remember people's names and faces.

    Here are the Edinburgh photos and here the ones from Copenhagen.

    And here is a little video montage of the Copenhagen event though I am the only one speaking in English and not Danish.



    I have also run two Knowledge Cafes, the first for Cabinet Office and Number 10 Downing Street staff as part of their "Better Cabinet Office Week" and the second at KM UK 2011.

    Slowly but surely, interest is growing in the vital role of conversation in business.
    ,
    12:57 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    It's been a great month for my Knowledge Cafes. I have run two masterclasses. The first was in Edinburgh on 7th June and the second in Copenhagen on 14th June.

    I have long taken photos at almost all my Knowledge Cafes and Masterclasses and posted them to Flickr but I am now increasingly posting them to Facebook also as here people can tag themselves and each other making the whole event far more social. I also love it as I get to remember people's names and faces.

    Here are the Edinburgh photos and here the ones from Copenhagen.

    And here is a little video montage of the Copenhagen event though I am the only one speaking in English and not Danish.



    I have also run two Knowledge Cafes, the first for Cabinet Office and Number 10 Downing Street staff as part of their "Better Cabinet Office Week" and the second at KM UK 2011.

    Slowly but surely, interest is growing in the vital role of conversation in business.
    ,
    12:57 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    It's been a great month for my Knowledge Cafes. I have run two masterclasses. The first was in Edinburgh on 7th June and the second in Copenhagen on 14th June.

    I have long taken photos at almost all my Knowledge Cafes and Masterclasses and posted them to Flickr but I am now increasingly posting them to Facebook also as here people can tag themselves and each other making the whole event far more social. I also love it as I get to remember people's names and faces.

    Here are the Edinburgh photos and here the ones from Copenhagen.

    And here is a little video montage of the Copenhagen event though I am the only one speaking in English and not Danish.



    I have also run two Knowledge Cafes, the first for Cabinet Office and Number 10 Downing Street staff as part of their "Better Cabinet Office Week" and the second at KM UK 2011.

    Slowly but surely, interest is growing in the vital role of conversation in business.
    ,
    12:57 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    It's been a great month for my Knowledge Cafes. I have run two masterclasses. The first was in Edinburgh on 7th June and the second in Copenhagen on 14th June.

    I have long taken photos at almost all my Knowledge Cafes and Masterclasses and posted them to Flickr but I am now increasingly posting them to Facebook also as here people can tag themselves and each other making the whole event far more social. I also love it as I get to remember people's names and faces.

    Here are the Edinburgh photos and here the ones from Copenhagen.

    And here is a little video montage of the Copenhagen event though I am the only one speaking in English and not Danish.



    I have also run two Knowledge Cafes, the first for Cabinet Office and Number 10 Downing Street staff as part of their "Better Cabinet Office Week" and the second at KM UK 2011.

    Slowly but surely, interest is growing in the vital role of conversation in business.
    ,
    12:57 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the June 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    It's been a great month for my Knowledge Cafes. I have run two masterclasses. The first was in Edinburgh on 7th June and the second in Copenhagen on 14th June.

    I have long taken photos at almost all my Knowledge Cafes and Masterclasses and posted them to Flickr but I am now increasingly posting them to Facebook also as here people can tag themselves and each other making the whole event far more social. I also love it as I get to remember people's names and faces.

    Here are the Edinburgh photos and here the ones from Copenhagen.

    And here is a little video montage of the Copenhagen event though I am the only one speaking in English and not Danish.



    I have also run two Knowledge Cafes, the first for Cabinet Office and Number 10 Downing Street staff as part of their "Better Cabinet Office Week" and the second at KM UK 2011.

    Slowly but surely, interest is growing in the vital role of conversation in business.

    Saturday 25 June 2011

    11:30 GDTPermanent link to #Proactive Reviews# Proactive Reviews - Comments (0)

    My recent Knowledge Cafe Masterclass in Copenhagen was a joint event with a good friend of mine Ditte Kolbaek where she launched her new book Proactive Reviews.

    For some time now Ditte has been running a form of After Action Review in Oracle that she calls Proactive Reviews. Its a similar process to AARs but with a few key improvements that make it a very powerful business tool.

    Oracle, for example, runs a high-level Proactive Review after every merger and are one of the few organisations I know of that have taken AARs seriously and are applying them in a systematic way in the business.

    If you speak Danish you can hear what Ditte has to say about them here:



    Also take a look at Ditte's website (this is in English). The book is currently only available in Danish but an English version will be published in September this year.

    I'll be talking more about the process then as I think this is one of the more exciting things to happen in KM for a while.
    ,
    11:30 GDTPermanent link to #Proactive Reviews# Proactive Reviews - Comments (0)

    My recent Knowledge Cafe Masterclass in Copenhagen was a joint event with a good friend of mine Ditte Kolbaek where she launched her new book Proactive Reviews.

    For some time now Ditte has been running a form of After Action Review in Oracle that she calls Proactive Reviews. Its a similar process to AARs but with a few key improvements that make it a very powerful business tool.

    Oracle, for example, runs a high-level Proactive Review after every merger and are one of the few organisations I know of that have taken AARs seriously and are applying them in a systematic way in the business.

    If you speak Danish you can hear what Ditte has to say about them here:



    Also take a look at Ditte's website (this is in English). The book is currently only available in Danish but an English version will be published in September this year.

    I'll be talking more about the process then as I think this is one of the more exciting things to happen in KM for a while.

    Saturday 25 June 2011

    10:26 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: June 2011# Knowledge tweets: June 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for May - June 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

    ,
    10:26 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: June 2011# Knowledge tweets: June 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for May - June 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

    ,
    10:26 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: June 2011# Knowledge tweets: June 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for May - June 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.


    Saturday 25 June 2011

    10:20 GDTPermanent link to #Amo La Vida (I love life)# Amo La Vida (I love life) - Comments (0)

    Thanks to Alan Stewart to pointing me to this amazing, inspiring video Amo La Vida

    "In this black-and-white interview, filmmaker Nic Askew interviews Julio Olalla. It is not an interview to sell anything or pitch anything. Its just Julio being Julio. He candidly speaks about an encounter with his father that changed his life, and what he learned: "Gratitude in so many ways is so dramatically missing in the world today. Without gratitude nothing is enough. It's the kind of short movie where you want to turn off the lights, and just soak in the spirit of an everyday hero.""



    When Alan first pointed me to the video, I tweeted it and in turn Luis Suarez liked it and blogged about it, summing it up far better than I ever could.

    It’s one of those video clips that will surely get you to shed a tear or two of pure joy filled with humanity, of what it is being a human being and behaving like one. Julio gets to talk about gratitudeand why we need to get it back into our day lives by sharing one of those moving stories that will make you think for a long while. He gets to talk as well about wisdom and how much different it is from knowledge itself, about the lost art of conversation, about what real friendships are all about.

    His sense of touching & embracing life is remarkably inspirational and one that permeates wisdom throughout, as well as being far too difficult to describe it in a single sentence or two over here without having my fingers tremble at that failed attempt. I know for certain I wouldn’t do any justice to it, so I better leave it down to you folks to go and listen to it further with just one thought: "Amo La Vida".

    Credit: Luis Suarez


    Saturday 25 June 2011

    09:57 GDTPermanent link to #Boring conversations and KM# Boring conversations and KM - Comments (0)

    My website automatically posted the following quotation on LinkedIn via Twitter recently

    "David Gurteen There is no conversation more boring than the one where everybody agrees. Michel de Montaigne http://bit.ly/ctwrQf via Twitter"

    To which Stephen Goodwin commented:

    "Not so sure about that ... conversations that constantly air disagreement may be worse."

    And I replied:

    "They may not be effective, even destructive but never boring LOL. I think much depends on the style of conversation. Intellectual debate and dialogue are effective. Argument, when it gets emotional and personal is not."

    I think some issues do need constant airing through both dialogue and debate. KM is one of them! Its also why KM is never boring - there is still so little agreement after so long. To me that is not a bad thing.

    Although all the claptrap about KM being dead I do find a little tedious.

    Thursday 23 June 2011

    10:23 GDTPermanent link to #Would you like 2GB of storage for free on the Cloud?# Would you like 2GB of storage for free on the Cloud? - Comments (0)

    Have you discovered Dropbox yet?

    Any file you save to Dropbox also instantly saves to your computers, phones, and the Dropbox website. 2GB of Dropbox for free, with subscriptions up to 100GB available.
    • Your files are always available from the secure Dropbox website.
    • Dropbox works with Windows, Mac, Linux, iPad, iPhone, Android and BlackBerry.
    • Works even when offline. You always have your files, whether or not you have a connection.
    • Dropbox transfers just the parts of a file that change (not the whole thing).
    • Manually set bandwidth limits -- Dropbox won't hog your connection.
    You can download the free version here: http://db.tt/i20ny92

    I use it all the time to transfer files from my PC to my iPhone and as a bonus I have them backed up on the web also. Love it!

    Disclosure: For every one of you who joins and installs Dropbox, they give us both 250 MB of bonus space (up to a limit of 8 GB)!

    Thursday 21 July 2011

    16:17 GDTPermanent link to #You don You don't need the threat of a speeding ticket to make you slow down - Comments (0)

    This is an excellent article on Harnessing the Power of Feedback Loops. In it the author explains the success of getting motorists to slow down in school zones by the use of "dynamic speed displays" that simply show a driver his or her speed on a large display by the side of the road.

    What I find interesting is that everyone seems to be surprised that this works. Why would drivers slow down without any threat of a speeding ticket or other form of punishment?

    I don't know about you, but I don't find this surprising at all. When driving, like many people, I do speed at times, mainly when the road is dry and clear and more often on motorways. In built up areas and near schools however, I try to keep to the speed limit but at times my speed creeps up and I don't notice even though I have a speedometer.

    I don't need to be fined or punished for this. If I am reminded by a radar controlled sign that am speeding I inevitably slow down.

    It comes back to my recent post on Stop doing things to people. We need to start to work from the assumption that people are responsible but that they are also fallible human beings that we need to work with and not against.

    Its very simple really. I am not at all surprised by the figures on reduction in speed.
    ,
    16:17 GDTPermanent link to #You don You don't need the threat of a speeding ticket to make you slow down - Comments (0)

    This is an excellent article on Harnessing the Power of Feedback Loops. In it the author explains the success of getting motorists to slow down in school zones by the use of "dynamic speed displays" that simply show a driver his or her speed on a large display by the side of the road.

    What I find interesting is that everyone seems to be surprised that this works. Why would drivers slow down without any threat of a speeding ticket or other form of punishment?

    I don't know about you, but I don't find this surprising at all. When driving, like many people, I do speed at times, mainly when the road is dry and clear and more often on motorways. In built up areas and near schools however, I try to keep to the speed limit but at times my speed creeps up and I don't notice even though I have a speedometer.

    I don't need to be fined or punished for this. If I am reminded by a radar controlled sign that am speeding I inevitably slow down.

    It comes back to my recent post on Stop doing things to people. We need to start to work from the assumption that people are responsible but that they are also fallible human beings that we need to work with and not against.

    Its very simple really. I am not at all surprised by the figures on reduction in speed.

    Sunday 19 June 2011

    12:39 GDTPermanent link to #We create machines in our own image and they, in turn, recreate us in theirs# We create machines in our own image and they, in turn, recreate us in theirs - Comments (0)

    This is one great little blog post Experts and Wikipedia from my good friend Nimmy (we have never met but we have known each other so long through the web that I consider her a very good friend).

    In her post, she makes a good point about sharing - that there are some things that we feel almost compelled to share. Things that are:
    • Inspiring
    • Thought-provoking
    • Humorous
    • Positive/optimistic/hopeful 
    • Paradoxical 
    This certainly matches the things that I like to share :-)

    She goes on to quote from a fascinating article on Wikipedia And The Death Of The Expert. Towards the end of the article, it talks about Marshall McLuhan and says this:
    McLuhan's chief insights centered around the idea that technology strongly affects not only the content of culture, but the mind that creates and consumes that culture. He maintained that technology alters cognition itself, all the way down to its deepest, most elemental processes.



    As Nimmy points out, if McLuhan is right, then "technology is not just an enabler" which we are so often prone to trot out.

    We shape our tools and in turn they shape us! Or in the words of the article "We create machines in our own image and they, in turn, recreate us in theirs."

    This idea is worth dwelling on. Its profound. Thanks Nimmy.
    ,
    12:39 GDTPermanent link to #We create machines in our own image and they, in turn, recreate us in theirs# We create machines in our own image and they, in turn, recreate us in theirs - Comments (0)

    This is one great little blog post Experts and Wikipedia from my good friend Nimmy (we have never met but we have known each other so long through the web that I consider her a very good friend).

    In her post, she makes a good point about sharing - that there are some things that we feel almost compelled to share. Things that are:
    • Inspiring
    • Thought-provoking
    • Humorous
    • Positive/optimistic/hopeful 
    • Paradoxical 
    This certainly matches the things that I like to share :-)

    She goes on to quote from a fascinating article on Wikipedia And The Death Of The Expert. Towards the end of the article, it talks about Marshall McLuhan and says this:
    McLuhan's chief insights centered around the idea that technology strongly affects not only the content of culture, but the mind that creates and consumes that culture. He maintained that technology alters cognition itself, all the way down to its deepest, most elemental processes.



    As Nimmy points out, if McLuhan is right, then "technology is not just an enabler" which we are so often prone to trot out.

    We shape our tools and in turn they shape us! Or in the words of the article "We create machines in our own image and they, in turn, recreate us in theirs."

    This idea is worth dwelling on. Its profound. Thanks Nimmy.
    ,
    12:39 GDTPermanent link to #We create machines in our own image and they, in turn, recreate us in theirs# We create machines in our own image and they, in turn, recreate us in theirs - Comments (0)

    This is one great little blog post Experts and Wikipedia from my good friend Nimmy (we have never met but we have known each other so long through the web that I consider her a very good friend).

    In her post, she makes a good point about sharing - that there are some things that we feel almost compelled to share. Things that are:
    • Inspiring
    • Thought-provoking
    • Humorous
    • Positive/optimistic/hopeful 
    • Paradoxical 
    This certainly matches the things that I like to share :-)

    She goes on to quote from a fascinating article on Wikipedia And The Death Of The Expert. Towards the end of the article, it talks about Marshall McLuhan and says this:
    McLuhan's chief insights centered around the idea that technology strongly affects not only the content of culture, but the mind that creates and consumes that culture. He maintained that technology alters cognition itself, all the way down to its deepest, most elemental processes.



    As Nimmy points out, if McLuhan is right, then "technology is not just an enabler" which we are so often prone to trot out.

    We shape our tools and in turn they shape us! Or in the words of the article "We create machines in our own image and they, in turn, recreate us in theirs."

    This idea is worth dwelling on. Its profound. Thanks Nimmy.

    Sunday 19 June 2011

    10:40 GDTPermanent link to #Think for yourself about KM# Think for yourself about KM - Comments (0)

    It surprises me that so many KM projects are undertaken by people with no training or education in KM and little or no project management/change management experience.

    If you plan to undertake a KM project then it makes sense to understand KM thoroughly, especially as most KM projects fail!

    One of the reasons many KM projects fail is that we are dealing with complex human systems. In addition to understanding KM, you need to understand organizational complexity. For example, you should study the work of Dave Snowden and his Cynefin Framework.

    You should also ensure that you understand the new emerging "Social KM" based on social tools and take the time to understand Intellectual Capital and other related disciplines.

    Some key points to keep in mind:
    • KM projects are tough: the toughest projects to undertake in any organization! If you are not a seasoned project manager with a fair degree of experience in change management then you are likely to fail!
    • KM means different things to different people and industries. HR, IT, Librarians etc all see KM through a different lens. What does it mean for your organization?
    • KM is about surfacing unknown problems - not just about responding to known ones or supporting business objectives.
    Some things to be cautious of:
    • Beware of prescriptions: KM is context dependent and there is no substitute to thinking things through in your context.
    • Beware of KM certification: There is nothing wrong in receiving certificates for attending a course or for being certified or accredited to practice specific KM techniques. (Cognitive Edge, for example, accredits practitioners who have attended their workshops.) What you do need to avoid is the nonsensical practice of certifying KM and awarding pretentious titles to participants such as "Certified Knowledge Manager." The field of KM is too broad, too deep and too rich for this to have any meaning whatsoever. It’s a cheap marketing technique.
    • Beware of case studies: People often ask me for case studies but I studiously avoid giving them as too often they paint a rosy picture and distort the truth. More often than not they are thinly disguised marketing material for a vendor or their so called “KM System”. They are also dangerous in that people tend to treat them as “prescriptions”. If it worked there it will work here. They inadvertently help avoid the need for thinking in context.
    • Beware of academics and of theory: There is nothing inherently wrong with academics and theory such as two by two matrices and conceptualization but it can cause you to take your eye of the ball. Focus on specifics and real world practical examples. And beware of prescriptive approaches and so called "best practices". Get real!
    • Beware of charlatans: There are far too many people teaching KM who have no idea what they are talking about or promoting old failed methods. There is also a lot of poor material on the web. Be cautious.
    The bottom line?

    There is no substitute for thinking for yourself in your specific context!



    Saturday 18 June 2011

    16:28 GDTPermanent link to #Open and transparent?# Open and transparent? - Comments (0)

    When considering knowledge sharing or creating a more collaborative culture, we often talk about the need for people to be open and for more transparency. These two concepts are usually used interchangeably and often without too much thought as to what they really mean.

    For a long time, in my mind, I have made a clear distinction between the two. Recently though, I was interviewed about knowledge sharing and the interviewer asked me what the difference was, as she thought they meant the same thing. I gave her what I felt was a simple answer at the time, but thought I'd try to articulate a more detailed view of the differences, as I see them, here.

    To my mind, to be effective as a knowledge worker you need to network – to share more; to work more collaboratively; and, to work in a way that facilitates continuous informal learning. Two of the major complementary behaviors that underpin this are the need to be 'open' and 'transparent'.

    Openness
    If you are open-minded, not closed, you are open to new ideas, to new thoughts, to new people and to new ways of working. When you come across new things you are curious and eager to explore them. You are non-judgmental and you look to engage other people in conversation – not so much in debate, but more in dialogue.

    You deliberately go out of your way to discover new things. You are an explorer!

    You ask for criticism from people -- not praise. You are not afraid when people challenge your ideas -- in fact you welcome it. This is how you learn. You are willing to 'let things in'. People can 'come in'. Hence the word: 'open'.

    Transparency
    If you are transparent, you work in a way which naturally enables people to see what you are doing. You publish your activity and your 'work in progress' as a by-product of the way that you work. You deliberately go out of your way to try to be honest and open about who you are. There is no façade, no pretence – with you, people get what they see.

    You speak in your own voice. You are authentic. Others can see clearly who you are, what you are doing and why you are doing it.

    You do not try to hide things out of fear of being seen to make a mistake. You actually want your mistakes to be seen. And you want others to point them out to you – that way you get to learn and to get even better at what you do. You make it easy for people to find you and to connect with you. You 'let things out'. People can 'see in'. Hence the word: 'transparent'.

    Behaviors
    Being open and transparent is a state of mind and more about general behavior than the use of any specific tools. But if you are open, and transparent the more likely you are to blog; to 'Twitter'; use wikis and other social-networking tools; give talks; publish papers, articles or newsletters; keep your calendar on-line; have an on-line presence indicator; and, write regular status reports on your activity and much more besides.

    Being open and transparent are not the only traits of an effective knowledge worker, but I do believe they are two of the core behaviors. So do you think openness and transparency are important? If so, just how open and transparent are you and what might you do to improve?


    ,
    16:28 GDTPermanent link to #Open and transparent?# Open and transparent? - Comments (0)

    When considering knowledge sharing or creating a more collaborative culture, we often talk about the need for people to be open and for more transparency. These two concepts are usually used interchangeably and often without too much thought as to what they really mean.

    For a long time, in my mind, I have made a clear distinction between the two. Recently though, I was interviewed about knowledge sharing and the interviewer asked me what the difference was, as she thought they meant the same thing. I gave her what I felt was a simple answer at the time, but thought I'd try to articulate a more detailed view of the differences, as I see them, here.

    To my mind, to be effective as a knowledge worker you need to network – to share more; to work more collaboratively; and, to work in a way that facilitates continuous informal learning. Two of the major complementary behaviors that underpin this are the need to be 'open' and 'transparent'.

    Openness
    If you are open-minded, not closed, you are open to new ideas, to new thoughts, to new people and to new ways of working. When you come across new things you are curious and eager to explore them. You are non-judgmental and you look to engage other people in conversation – not so much in debate, but more in dialogue.

    You deliberately go out of your way to discover new things. You are an explorer!

    You ask for criticism from people -- not praise. You are not afraid when people challenge your ideas -- in fact you welcome it. This is how you learn. You are willing to 'let things in'. People can 'come in'. Hence the word: 'open'.

    Transparency
    If you are transparent, you work in a way which naturally enables people to see what you are doing. You publish your activity and your 'work in progress' as a by-product of the way that you work. You deliberately go out of your way to try to be honest and open about who you are. There is no façade, no pretence – with you, people get what they see.

    You speak in your own voice. You are authentic. Others can see clearly who you are, what you are doing and why you are doing it.

    You do not try to hide things out of fear of being seen to make a mistake. You actually want your mistakes to be seen. And you want others to point them out to you – that way you get to learn and to get even better at what you do. You make it easy for people to find you and to connect with you. You 'let things out'. People can 'see in'. Hence the word: 'transparent'.

    Behaviors
    Being open and transparent is a state of mind and more about general behavior than the use of any specific tools. But if you are open, and transparent the more likely you are to blog; to 'Twitter'; use wikis and other social-networking tools; give talks; publish papers, articles or newsletters; keep your calendar on-line; have an on-line presence indicator; and, write regular status reports on your activity and much more besides.

    Being open and transparent are not the only traits of an effective knowledge worker, but I do believe they are two of the core behaviors. So do you think openness and transparency are important? If so, just how open and transparent are you and what might you do to improve?



    Saturday 18 June 2011

    15:01 GDTPermanent link to #Latest discussons from the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Latest discussons from the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn is steadily growing and has increased by about 70 members over the last 4 weeks from 2,488 to 2,566 today.

    There are some great discussions taking place .... here are a few of interesting ones that you might like to take a look at or join in:


    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join and the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539

    And of you are interested in conversational tools such as Knowledge Cafes, AARs, peer-assists and the like then take a look at my recently created Gurteen Knowledge Cafe Forum. This is a LinkedIn subgroup of the main Gurteen Knowledge Community on LinkedIn.
    ,
    15:01 GDTPermanent link to #Latest discussons from the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Latest discussons from the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn is steadily growing and has increased by about 70 members over the last 4 weeks from 2,488 to 2,566 today.

    There are some great discussions taking place .... here are a few of interesting ones that you might like to take a look at or join in:


    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join and the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539

    And of you are interested in conversational tools such as Knowledge Cafes, AARs, peer-assists and the like then take a look at my recently created Gurteen Knowledge Cafe Forum. This is a LinkedIn subgroup of the main Gurteen Knowledge Community on LinkedIn.

    Tuesday 24 May 2011

    21:47 GDTPermanent link to #A tale of two cafes# A tale of two cafes - Comments (0)

    Many of you will be familiar with my Knowledge Cafe and maybe also with the World Cafe. Until now, I have not really involved myself with the World Cafe as although it is a similar process to my Knowledge Cafe process there are some subtle but significant differences. But now, as I start to put more of my focus into my Knowledge Cafes and other face-to-face conversational tools, it makes sense for me to get involved with the World Cafe in various ways.

    A start to this has been to make contact with Juanita Brown and David Isaacs, the founders of the World Cafe and also to join the World Cafe Online community  and their World Cafe LinkedIn Group. As most people, in the World Cafe community are not familiar with me or my work, I recently posted this introduction to myself on the World Cafe Online Community  website.

    I thought I would share a key element of this with you ... the section that briefly describes the difference between the World Cafe and my Knowledge Cafe. I will be writing more on this over time.

    I would like to tell you more about my Knowledge Cafes. I call them Gurteen Knowledge Cafes mainly to distinguish my process from other forms of Knowledge Cafe and the World Cafe but also partly to brand them. The roots of my Cafe are different to those of the World Cafe. I started to run my Cafes in London, in September 2002 in response to my frustration with death-by-powerpoint KM talks. Although I was aware of the World Cafe at the time (Juanita and David gave birth to the World Cafes way back in 1995), because of the language that was used to describe it, I did not see it as a business tool and did not take too much notice of it.

    I developed the Gurteen Knowledge Cafe from my own experiences and a desire for an alternative to traditional presentations. In recent years, I have run my Knowledge Cafes and my Knowledge Cafe masterclasses, where I teach people how to design and run Knowledge Cafes, all over the world. To give you an idea, I have run them in cities such as Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta, Bangkok, Hong, Kong, Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Wellington, Christchurch, Auckland, Seattle, Phoenix, Quebec City, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Bogota, Amsterdam, Frankfurt, Oslo, Johannesburg, Pretoria, Cape Town, Stellenbosch, Brussels, Dubai and Abu Dhabi.

    What is interesting, now that I have taken the time to look closer at the World Cafe, is that the two processes are very similar. There are differences though that although small on the surface, I think are significant e.g. no table hosts. But the major difference is that my Cafes are business focused where the World Cafe is community focused. I use business language rather than community language and although there is a core process, I teach people how they can adapt the Cafe to different business ends.

    Don't misunderstand me, there is nothing wrong with the World Cafe and I love the work that the World Cafe Community is doing around the world to address social issues and build community. This is an area I am increasingly interested in. If you follow me on Twitter (@DavidGurteen) you will see many of my tweets tagged #SocialGood. But it is hard enough selling the Knowledge Cafe concept into business organisations when the outcomes are so intangible, never mind using the language of the World Cafe which turns most business managers off. I don't agree with it but that's the reality

    I see a number of KM face-to-face knowledge sharing processes as having a great deal in common with each other e.g. peer assists, after-action reviews, post-project reviews, knowledge cafes and knowledge jams. If we add to these the World Cafe, Open Space Technology and Appreciative Inquiry then we have a category of face-to-face conversational based tools that I call "Conversation Cafes". I am also a keen advocate of Unconference and Barcamps. This is increasingly my area of focus.

    Over the coming 12 months, I plan to run many more of my open Knowledge Cafes (these are free events) and Knowledge Cafe masterclasses in London and around Europe but also as I have always done, around the world as I travel.

    ,
    21:47 GDTPermanent link to #A tale of two cafes# A tale of two cafes - Comments (0)

    Many of you will be familiar with my Knowledge Cafe and maybe also with the World Cafe. Until now, I have not really involved myself with the World Cafe as although it is a similar process to my Knowledge Cafe process there are some subtle but significant differences. But now, as I start to put more of my focus into my Knowledge Cafes and other face-to-face conversational tools, it makes sense for me to get involved with the World Cafe in various ways.

    A start to this has been to make contact with Juanita Brown and David Isaacs, the founders of the World Cafe and also to join the World Cafe Online community  and their World Cafe LinkedIn Group. As most people, in the World Cafe community are not familiar with me or my work, I recently posted this introduction to myself on the World Cafe Online Community  website.

    I thought I would share a key element of this with you ... the section that briefly describes the difference between the World Cafe and my Knowledge Cafe. I will be writing more on this over time.

    I would like to tell you more about my Knowledge Cafes. I call them Gurteen Knowledge Cafes mainly to distinguish my process from other forms of Knowledge Cafe and the World Cafe but also partly to brand them. The roots of my Cafe are different to those of the World Cafe. I started to run my Cafes in London, in September 2002 in response to my frustration with death-by-powerpoint KM talks. Although I was aware of the World Cafe at the time (Juanita and David gave birth to the World Cafes way back in 1995), because of the language that was used to describe it, I did not see it as a business tool and did not take too much notice of it.

    I developed the Gurteen Knowledge Cafe from my own experiences and a desire for an alternative to traditional presentations. In recent years, I have run my Knowledge Cafes and my Knowledge Cafe masterclasses, where I teach people how to design and run Knowledge Cafes, all over the world. To give you an idea, I have run them in cities such as Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta, Bangkok, Hong, Kong, Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Wellington, Christchurch, Auckland, Seattle, Phoenix, Quebec City, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Bogota, Amsterdam, Frankfurt, Oslo, Johannesburg, Pretoria, Cape Town, Stellenbosch, Brussels, Dubai and Abu Dhabi.

    What is interesting, now that I have taken the time to look closer at the World Cafe, is that the two processes are very similar. There are differences though that although small on the surface, I think are significant e.g. no table hosts. But the major difference is that my Cafes are business focused where the World Cafe is community focused. I use business language rather than community language and although there is a core process, I teach people how they can adapt the Cafe to different business ends.

    Don't misunderstand me, there is nothing wrong with the World Cafe and I love the work that the World Cafe Community is doing around the world to address social issues and build community. This is an area I am increasingly interested in. If you follow me on Twitter (@DavidGurteen) you will see many of my tweets tagged #SocialGood. But it is hard enough selling the Knowledge Cafe concept into business organisations when the outcomes are so intangible, never mind using the language of the World Cafe which turns most business managers off. I don't agree with it but that's the reality

    I see a number of KM face-to-face knowledge sharing processes as having a great deal in common with each other e.g. peer assists, after-action reviews, post-project reviews, knowledge cafes and knowledge jams. If we add to these the World Cafe, Open Space Technology and Appreciative Inquiry then we have a category of face-to-face conversational based tools that I call "Conversation Cafes". I am also a keen advocate of Unconference and Barcamps. This is increasingly my area of focus.

    Over the coming 12 months, I plan to run many more of my open Knowledge Cafes (these are free events) and Knowledge Cafe masterclasses in London and around Europe but also as I have always done, around the world as I travel.

    ,
    21:47 GDTPermanent link to #A tale of two cafes# A tale of two cafes - Comments (0)

    Many of you will be familiar with my Knowledge Cafe and maybe also with the World Cafe. Until now, I have not really involved myself with the World Cafe as although it is a similar process to my Knowledge Cafe process there are some subtle but significant differences. But now, as I start to put more of my focus into my Knowledge Cafes and other face-to-face conversational tools, it makes sense for me to get involved with the World Cafe in various ways.

    A start to this has been to make contact with Juanita Brown and David Isaacs, the founders of the World Cafe and also to join the World Cafe Online community  and their World Cafe LinkedIn Group. As most people, in the World Cafe community are not familiar with me or my work, I recently posted this introduction to myself on the World Cafe Online Community  website.

    I thought I would share a key element of this with you ... the section that briefly describes the difference between the World Cafe and my Knowledge Cafe. I will be writing more on this over time.

    I would like to tell you more about my Knowledge Cafes. I call them Gurteen Knowledge Cafes mainly to distinguish my process from other forms of Knowledge Cafe and the World Cafe but also partly to brand them. The roots of my Cafe are different to those of the World Cafe. I started to run my Cafes in London, in September 2002 in response to my frustration with death-by-powerpoint KM talks. Although I was aware of the World Cafe at the time (Juanita and David gave birth to the World Cafes way back in 1995), because of the language that was used to describe it, I did not see it as a business tool and did not take too much notice of it.

    I developed the Gurteen Knowledge Cafe from my own experiences and a desire for an alternative to traditional presentations. In recent years, I have run my Knowledge Cafes and my Knowledge Cafe masterclasses, where I teach people how to design and run Knowledge Cafes, all over the world. To give you an idea, I have run them in cities such as Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta, Bangkok, Hong, Kong, Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Wellington, Christchurch, Auckland, Seattle, Phoenix, Quebec City, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Bogota, Amsterdam, Frankfurt, Oslo, Johannesburg, Pretoria, Cape Town, Stellenbosch, Brussels, Dubai and Abu Dhabi.

    What is interesting, now that I have taken the time to look closer at the World Cafe, is that the two processes are very similar. There are differences though that although small on the surface, I think are significant e.g. no table hosts. But the major difference is that my Cafes are business focused where the World Cafe is community focused. I use business language rather than community language and although there is a core process, I teach people how they can adapt the Cafe to different business ends.

    Don't misunderstand me, there is nothing wrong with the World Cafe and I love the work that the World Cafe Community is doing around the world to address social issues and build community. This is an area I am increasingly interested in. If you follow me on Twitter (@DavidGurteen) you will see many of my tweets tagged #SocialGood. But it is hard enough selling the Knowledge Cafe concept into business organisations when the outcomes are so intangible, never mind using the language of the World Cafe which turns most business managers off. I don't agree with it but that's the reality

    I see a number of KM face-to-face knowledge sharing processes as having a great deal in common with each other e.g. peer assists, after-action reviews, post-project reviews, knowledge cafes and knowledge jams. If we add to these the World Cafe, Open Space Technology and Appreciative Inquiry then we have a category of face-to-face conversational based tools that I call "Conversation Cafes". I am also a keen advocate of Unconference and Barcamps. This is increasingly my area of focus.

    Over the coming 12 months, I plan to run many more of my open Knowledge Cafes (these are free events) and Knowledge Cafe masterclasses in London and around Europe but also as I have always done, around the world as I travel.


    Tuesday 24 May 2011

    21:45 GDTPermanent link to #Don Don't use standardized appraisal forms - Comments (0)

    Tom Peters gives an order - Dont use standardised appraisal forms!



    You might even want to consider going further by reading this book Abolishing Performance Appraisals: Why They Backfire and What to Do Instead. Or reading this review.

    Personally, both as a recipient and a manager I have always loathed traditional performance appraisals.

    There has got to be a better way!
    ,
    21:45 GDTPermanent link to #Don Don't use standardized appraisal forms - Comments (0)

    Tom Peters gives an order - Dont use standardised appraisal forms!



    You might even want to consider going further by reading this book Abolishing Performance Appraisals: Why They Backfire and What to Do Instead. Or reading this review.

    Personally, both as a recipient and a manager I have always loathed traditional performance appraisals.

    There has got to be a better way!
    ,
    21:45 GDTPermanent link to #Don Don't use standardized appraisal forms - Comments (0)

    Tom Peters gives an order - Dont use standardised appraisal forms!



    You might even want to consider going further by reading this book Abolishing Performance Appraisals: Why They Backfire and What to Do Instead. Or reading this review.

    Personally, both as a recipient and a manager I have always loathed traditional performance appraisals.

    There has got to be a better way!
    ,
    21:45 GDTPermanent link to #Don Don't use standardized appraisal forms - Comments (0)

    Tom Peters gives an order - Dont use standardised appraisal forms!



    You might even want to consider going further by reading this book Abolishing Performance Appraisals: Why They Backfire and What to Do Instead. Or reading this review.

    Personally, both as a recipient and a manager I have always loathed traditional performance appraisals.

    There has got to be a better way!

    Tuesday 24 May 2011

    21:23 GDTPermanent link to #We are volunteers not conscripts# We are volunteers not conscripts - Comments (0)

    This post from Johnnie Moore and another post from Euan Semple both resonated with me recently.

    Managers really have to start treating people like volunteers and not conscripts. Or as I so often put it "We must stop doing things to people and start to work together."

    Its a principal I apply in my Knowledge Cafes. People are not forced to come and then I quite deliberately do not force people to join in or try to manipulate them or the conversation in any way. (And yes I am aware it is impossible to entirely do that :-) )

    I tell them that if they just wish to just listen that is perfectly OK. And the final part of my Cafe, where I go around the circle and ask people to share one actionable insight with the group, I also give people the change to opt-out by saying "pass".
    ,
    21:23 GDTPermanent link to #We are volunteers not conscripts# We are volunteers not conscripts - Comments (0)

    This post from Johnnie Moore and another post from Euan Semple both resonated with me recently.

    Managers really have to start treating people like volunteers and not conscripts. Or as I so often put it "We must stop doing things to people and start to work together."

    Its a principal I apply in my Knowledge Cafes. People are not forced to come and then I quite deliberately do not force people to join in or try to manipulate them or the conversation in any way. (And yes I am aware it is impossible to entirely do that :-) )

    I tell them that if they just wish to just listen that is perfectly OK. And the final part of my Cafe, where I go around the circle and ask people to share one actionable insight with the group, I also give people the change to opt-out by saying "pass".

    Tuesday 24 May 2011

    21:20 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the May 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the May 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    I occassionally start this newsletter with a little rant :-) and that's just what I am going to do today :-)

    I often want to phone someone I have not phoned before but its not always easy. First, I frequently have difficulty finding the persons phone number online and then even when I have, barriers still exist

    • Is it a home no, an office no or a mobile no? There is often no way of telling. This is important to know when calling out of hours or when I know the person is travelling. Also knowing if its a mobile number or not allows me to text them rather than to call.
    • Does the number include the international country code and are there any leading digits I need to add or drop when making an international call? I can waste a lot of time figuring this out.
    • Is the phone an iPhone or more generally what sort of smart phone is it? This is becoming more and more important as being an iPhone user myself, if the person I am calling is an iPhone, Android or Blackberry user then I can use apps like WhatsApp, Tango or Viber not only to make a free call but to send text or voice messages, video clips and photos. (These sort of apps are the future of the mobile phone by the way.)

    So please, when you put your phone number on your email footer, your website or blog make it clear e.g. iPhone: +44 7774 178 650 and include the spaces to make the number easy to transcribe.

    I try to put my phone number everywhere. I want people to contact me. Many people keep their phone number very private as they tell me they do not want nuisance calls. Funny, in 15 years or more of making my number freely available, I can only recall one such call.

    Tuesday 24 May 2011

    20:36 GDTPermanent link to #We must stop doing things to people# We must stop doing things to people - Comments (0)

    One of my frequent messages is that we need to stop "doing things to people and start to work together". Let me explain.

    People often ask me "How do we make people share?" or "How so we make people adopt social tools?" or, more generally, "How do we make people more engaged?".

    That little word "make" comes up time and again. It's really obvious when it does and I wince every time I hear it.

    Yet even when I point it out and people apologise and say "Oh I didn't mean that; it was just a turn of phrase", I am still not convinced. Deep down we all feel the need to "make people be different". Oh, wouldn't it be so good if everyone was just like me?

    Recently I have started to realise that there is a more subtle approach. The other things I often get asked are "How do we incentivise people?" or "How do we motivate them?".

    Think about it. Once again, we are trying to do things to people – incentivise or motivate them; however we look at it, we are trying to change them!

    And then, I will hear people say (or catch myself saying) "How do we help people to see things differently?" or "How do we support them in this change?".

    But notice, in all these statements, the assumption is that we know best -- that we have the right answers and others do not, and that we need to intervene and correct them. Even if we do wrap it all up in cotton-wool and say "help" rather than "make".

    The really deep issue is that we are thinking about the world as "us and them", when we need to be thinking in terms of "we".

    Rather than "I am here to help you", which implies you are in need of help and I am your saviour, we need to approach people with "How can we work better together?". And we need to mean that. It is not some ploy to enact our predetermined agenda. It's about approaching them without an agenda other than to genuinely work with them better.

    I have also noticed another strange phenomena: people will often tell me that the biggest excuse that their staff use for not changing, doing things differently or sharing their knowledge is that they have no time. But then the conversation moves on and when sometime later, I ask them whether they blog, tweet, write articles or give presentations (in other words, do they walk the talk?) guess what they say? "Oh no, David. If only I had the time!". They are using exactly the same excuse.

    Each year in its December issue, Time magazine announces its person of the year. In the December 2006 issue, in reaction to Web 2.0, it announced that person as "you" and added "Yes, you. You control the Information Age. Welcome to your world."

    Personally, if I had been the editor, I would have phrased it somewhat differently:"We, yes, we. We control the information age. Welcome to our world".

    So, some thoughts for this new world:
    1. Stop doing things to people;
    2. Become the change we wish to see; and
    3. Start to work together.

    We are moving to a participatory "WE" world. So whenever you initiate anything ask yourself the question: "Am I trying to do things to people or am I approaching them with a genuine view to work together better?".



    Sunday 22 May 2011

    20:22 GDTPermanent link to #Latest discussons from the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Latest discussons from the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn has grown by about 70 members over the last 4 weeks from 2,417 to 2,488 today.

    There are various discussions taking place .... here are three interesting ones that you might like to take a look at or join in:


    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join and the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539

    And of you are interested in conversational tools such as Knowledge Cafes, AARs, peer-assists and the like then take a look at my recently created Gurteen Knowledge Cafe Forum. This is a LinkedIn subgroup of the main Gurteen Knowledge Community on LinkedIn.
    ,
    20:22 GDTPermanent link to #Latest discussons from the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Latest discussons from the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn has grown by about 70 members over the last 4 weeks from 2,417 to 2,488 today.

    There are various discussions taking place .... here are three interesting ones that you might like to take a look at or join in:


    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join and the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539

    And of you are interested in conversational tools such as Knowledge Cafes, AARs, peer-assists and the like then take a look at my recently created Gurteen Knowledge Cafe Forum. This is a LinkedIn subgroup of the main Gurteen Knowledge Community on LinkedIn.

    Sunday 22 May 2011

    19:56 GDTPermanent link to #What interesting toilet paper# What interesting toilet paper - Comments (0)

    Funny, how you find one thing when you are looking for something totally different. I was looking for toilet -paper - yes toilet paper. I could never find a toilet paper I liked until I recently bought a pack of "One supersofty quilted toilet tissue" from my local supermarket and loved it.

    Anyway, I was complementing myself on the find when I thought I had better go check the pack for the name of the brand so I could buy some more. And this is what it said on the pack. "100% of our profit helps to fund sanitation and hygiene projects in Africa". Wow! What a brilliant idea I thought ... so I ran downstairs to check out their website.

    They have a whole range of products based on a really simple idea. They create quality products, and every time you buy one, they donate 100% of the profit to projects in developing countries.

    But here is the clever bit: Every one of their products funds a like-for-like equivalent, for example, their toilet tissue funds hygiene and sanitation projects in Africa and their One organic free range eggs fund community egg farming projects in Malawi.

    As they say on their site: " So it's really easy to understand where your money goes. And it's really easy to make a difference. You don't even need to change your habits, just the products in your shopping basket."

    What a great Social Business. Toms Shoes is another great example.
    ,
    19:56 GDTPermanent link to #What interesting toilet paper# What interesting toilet paper - Comments (0)

    Funny, how you find one thing when you are looking for something totally different. I was looking for toilet -paper - yes toilet paper. I could never find a toilet paper I liked until I recently bought a pack of "One supersofty quilted toilet tissue" from my local supermarket and loved it.

    Anyway, I was complementing myself on the find when I thought I had better go check the pack for the name of the brand so I could buy some more. And this is what it said on the pack. "100% of our profit helps to fund sanitation and hygiene projects in Africa". Wow! What a brilliant idea I thought ... so I ran downstairs to check out their website.

    They have a whole range of products based on a really simple idea. They create quality products, and every time you buy one, they donate 100% of the profit to projects in developing countries.

    But here is the clever bit: Every one of their products funds a like-for-like equivalent, for example, their toilet tissue funds hygiene and sanitation projects in Africa and their One organic free range eggs fund community egg farming projects in Malawi.

    As they say on their site: " So it's really easy to understand where your money goes. And it's really easy to make a difference. You don't even need to change your habits, just the products in your shopping basket."

    What a great Social Business. Toms Shoes is another great example.

    Sunday 22 May 2011

    19:12 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: May 2011# Knowledge tweets: May 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for April - May 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • The Cats Explore http://bit.ly/j4Wevu /my daughter's blog, pure nostalgia of her childhood, yes that's me in the last photo :-)
      2011-05-20 17:05:51 UTC

    • Book: Knowledge Works (15 Jun 2011) by Christine Van Winkelen, Jane McKenzie http://bit.ly/jIJioO #KM
      2011-05-20 16:36:25 UTC

    • Sharing Information Corrupts Wisdom of Crowds http://bit.ly/lpkMx4 #KM
      2011-05-20 08:08:12 UTC

    • Fighting the Knowledge Hiding Epidemic http://bit.ly/kPIy9n #KM
      2011-05-20 07:14:31 UTC

    • Questioning Academic Authority http://bit.ly/lqOMjs /funny but so sad
      2011-05-20 06:38:16 UTC

    • Understanding the processes that lead from connecting to sharing and finally to collaborating. http://bit.ly/jYZDhO #KM
      2011-05-19 15:42:37 UTC

    • Team Building through Brainstorming & Conversation http://bit.ly/m2brka #GoodToTalk
      2011-05-19 12:26:37 UTC

    • Mastering social media for networked learning http://bit.ly/ioQhSs #SocialLearning
      2011-05-19 11:12:44 UTC

    • The Evolution of the Knowledge Web Worker http://bit.ly/m2CdxN #KM
      2011-05-17 18:27:37 UTC

    • Phil Bradley comments on Seth's Blog: The future of the library http://bit.ly/miObrs #KM
      2011-05-17 11:24:30 UTC

    • Managing in a networked world http://bit.ly/klJ6l4
      2011-05-17 09:29:57 UTC

    • Foursquare's Dennis Crowley Delivers Graduation Speech at Syracuse [VIDEO] http://on.mash.to/mRmqhD
      2011-05-17 07:39:28 UTC

    • Are you motivated or committed? http://bit.ly/jzM2ze
      2011-05-16 22:29:53 UTC

    • The future of the library. What is a public library for? by @sethgodin http://bit.ly/kXzIRc
      2011-05-16 12:31:06 UTC

    • Is your presentation like shampoo? http://bit.ly/mdIUa0
      2011-05-16 12:21:05 UTC

    • Four tips for a better networking event http://bit.ly/jrjeem
      2011-05-15 07:20:01 UTC

    • A large part of the benefit of conferences is that they are an opportunity for networking and side conversations. http://bit.ly/mRLlxu
      2011-05-12 07:01:02 UTC

    • THE WORLD'S BIGGEST PROBLEMS http://bit.ly/k6JtrS #WBP
      2011-05-07 11:58:02 UTC

    • There are no successful social media implementations inside firewalls http://bit.ly/k0thD9 #SocialBusiness
      2011-05-06 06:37:10 UTC

    • It is a mistake to write down your values, as the act of codification results in their loss. From @snowded http://bit.ly/jkvKbS
      2011-05-06 06:33:00 UTC

    • Report outs should be abolished. The value of a small group discussion is in the discussion. http://bit.ly/lJTrTd #GoodToTalk
      2011-05-05 20:16:49 UTC

    • Guidelines for Leveraging Collective Knowledge and Insight by Nancy Dixon http://bit.ly/kvwm7z #KM #GoodToTalk
      2011-05-05 20:11:49 UTC

    • RT @elsua: Goodness! Everyone who uses the Web on a regular basis should watch this awesome TED Talk! HT @rhappe http://bit.ly/krrYrh
      2011-05-04 20:24:42 UTC

    • Lessig: Just how badly have we messed up the architecture of access to scientific knowledge? http://bit.ly/lLycbx #KM
      2011-05-04 20:02:13 UTC

    • 'Activity Streams' Will Be the Glue of Your Online Life http://bit.ly/ldfN4b
      2011-05-04 19:55:14 UTC

    • Why Activity Streams Will Save You From Information Overload by @elsua http://bit.ly/kfQBn7 #KM
      2011-05-04 19:41:46 UTC

    • How to connect people in large group settings http://bit.ly/iLEGfd #facilitation
      2011-05-04 19:37:15 UTC

    • Social tools require people to observe the world, make sense of it, and convey that sense to others by @euan http://bit.ly/l1bWk8
      2011-05-04 19:35:53 UTC

    • Retweet of Michael Sampson (collabguy)
      Encourage the Quieter People to Speak: Do or Don't? #collaboration #facilitation @davidgurteen http://bit.ly/jfTEnX
      2011-04-29 14:28:28 UTC


    ,
    19:12 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: May 2011# Knowledge tweets: May 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for April - May 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • The Cats Explore http://bit.ly/j4Wevu /my daughter's blog, pure nostalgia of her childhood, yes that's me in the last photo :-)
      2011-05-20 17:05:51 UTC

    • Book: Knowledge Works (15 Jun 2011) by Christine Van Winkelen, Jane McKenzie http://bit.ly/jIJioO #KM
      2011-05-20 16:36:25 UTC

    • Sharing Information Corrupts Wisdom of Crowds http://bit.ly/lpkMx4 #KM
      2011-05-20 08:08:12 UTC

    • Fighting the Knowledge Hiding Epidemic http://bit.ly/kPIy9n #KM
      2011-05-20 07:14:31 UTC

    • Questioning Academic Authority http://bit.ly/lqOMjs /funny but so sad
      2011-05-20 06:38:16 UTC

    • Understanding the processes that lead from connecting to sharing and finally to collaborating. http://bit.ly/jYZDhO #KM
      2011-05-19 15:42:37 UTC

    • Team Building through Brainstorming & Conversation http://bit.ly/m2brka #GoodToTalk
      2011-05-19 12:26:37 UTC

    • Mastering social media for networked learning http://bit.ly/ioQhSs #SocialLearning
      2011-05-19 11:12:44 UTC

    • The Evolution of the Knowledge Web Worker http://bit.ly/m2CdxN #KM
      2011-05-17 18:27:37 UTC

    • Phil Bradley comments on Seth's Blog: The future of the library http://bit.ly/miObrs #KM
      2011-05-17 11:24:30 UTC

    • Managing in a networked world http://bit.ly/klJ6l4
      2011-05-17 09:29:57 UTC

    • Foursquare's Dennis Crowley Delivers Graduation Speech at Syracuse [VIDEO] http://on.mash.to/mRmqhD
      2011-05-17 07:39:28 UTC

    • Are you motivated or committed? http://bit.ly/jzM2ze
      2011-05-16 22:29:53 UTC

    • The future of the library. What is a public library for? by @sethgodin http://bit.ly/kXzIRc
      2011-05-16 12:31:06 UTC

    • Is your presentation like shampoo? http://bit.ly/mdIUa0
      2011-05-16 12:21:05 UTC

    • Four tips for a better networking event http://bit.ly/jrjeem
      2011-05-15 07:20:01 UTC

    • A large part of the benefit of conferences is that they are an opportunity for networking and side conversations. http://bit.ly/mRLlxu
      2011-05-12 07:01:02 UTC

    • THE WORLD'S BIGGEST PROBLEMS http://bit.ly/k6JtrS #WBP
      2011-05-07 11:58:02 UTC

    • There are no successful social media implementations inside firewalls http://bit.ly/k0thD9 #SocialBusiness
      2011-05-06 06:37:10 UTC

    • It is a mistake to write down your values, as the act of codification results in their loss. From @snowded http://bit.ly/jkvKbS
      2011-05-06 06:33:00 UTC

    • Report outs should be abolished. The value of a small group discussion is in the discussion. http://bit.ly/lJTrTd #GoodToTalk
      2011-05-05 20:16:49 UTC

    • Guidelines for Leveraging Collective Knowledge and Insight by Nancy Dixon http://bit.ly/kvwm7z #KM #GoodToTalk
      2011-05-05 20:11:49 UTC

    • RT @elsua: Goodness! Everyone who uses the Web on a regular basis should watch this awesome TED Talk! HT @rhappe http://bit.ly/krrYrh
      2011-05-04 20:24:42 UTC

    • Lessig: Just how badly have we messed up the architecture of access to scientific knowledge? http://bit.ly/lLycbx #KM
      2011-05-04 20:02:13 UTC

    • 'Activity Streams' Will Be the Glue of Your Online Life http://bit.ly/ldfN4b
      2011-05-04 19:55:14 UTC

    • Why Activity Streams Will Save You From Information Overload by @elsua http://bit.ly/kfQBn7 #KM
      2011-05-04 19:41:46 UTC

    • How to connect people in large group settings http://bit.ly/iLEGfd #facilitation
      2011-05-04 19:37:15 UTC

    • Social tools require people to observe the world, make sense of it, and convey that sense to others by @euan http://bit.ly/l1bWk8
      2011-05-04 19:35:53 UTC

    • Retweet of Michael Sampson (collabguy)
      Encourage the Quieter People to Speak: Do or Don't? #collaboration #facilitation @davidgurteen http://bit.ly/jfTEnX
      2011-04-29 14:28:28 UTC


    ,
    19:12 GDTPermanent link to #Knowledge tweets: May 2011# Knowledge tweets: May 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for April - May 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • The Cats Explore http://bit.ly/j4Wevu /my daughter's blog, pure nostalgia of her childhood, yes that's me in the last photo :-)
      2011-05-20 17:05:51 UTC

    • Book: Knowledge Works (15 Jun 2011) by Christine Van Winkelen, Jane McKenzie http://bit.ly/jIJioO #KM
      2011-05-20 16:36:25 UTC

    • Sharing Information Corrupts Wisdom of Crowds http://bit.ly/lpkMx4 #KM
      2011-05-20 08:08:12 UTC

    • Fighting the Knowledge Hiding Epidemic http://bit.ly/kPIy9n #KM
      2011-05-20 07:14:31 UTC

    • Questioning Academic Authority http://bit.ly/lqOMjs /funny but so sad
      2011-05-20 06:38:16 UTC

    • Understanding the processes that lead from connecting to sharing and finally to collaborating. http://bit.ly/jYZDhO #KM
      2011-05-19 15:42:37 UTC

    • Team Building through Brainstorming & Conversation http://bit.ly/m2brka #GoodToTalk
      2011-05-19 12:26:37 UTC

    • Mastering social media for networked learning http://bit.ly/ioQhSs #SocialLearning
      2011-05-19 11:12:44 UTC

    • The Evolution of the Knowledge Web Worker http://bit.ly/m2CdxN #KM
      2011-05-17 18:27:37 UTC

    • Phil Bradley comments on Seth's Blog: The future of the library http://bit.ly/miObrs #KM
      2011-05-17 11:24:30 UTC

    • Managing in a networked world http://bit.ly/klJ6l4
      2011-05-17 09:29:57 UTC

    • Foursquare's Dennis Crowley Delivers Graduation Speech at Syracuse [VIDEO] http://on.mash.to/mRmqhD
      2011-05-17 07:39:28 UTC

    • Are you motivated or committed? http://bit.ly/jzM2ze
      2011-05-16 22:29:53 UTC

    • The future of the library. What is a public library for? by @sethgodin http://bit.ly/kXzIRc
      2011-05-16 12:31:06 UTC

    • Is your presentation like shampoo? http://bit.ly/mdIUa0
      2011-05-16 12:21:05 UTC

    • Four tips for a better networking event http://bit.ly/jrjeem
      2011-05-15 07:20:01 UTC

    • A large part of the benefit of conferences is that they are an opportunity for networking and side conversations. http://bit.ly/mRLlxu
      2011-05-12 07:01:02 UTC

    • THE WORLD'S BIGGEST PROBLEMS http://bit.ly/k6JtrS #WBP
      2011-05-07 11:58:02 UTC

    • There are no successful social media implementations inside firewalls http://bit.ly/k0thD9 #SocialBusiness
      2011-05-06 06:37:10 UTC

    • It is a mistake to write down your values, as the act of codification results in their loss. From @snowded http://bit.ly/jkvKbS
      2011-05-06 06:33:00 UTC

    • Report outs should be abolished. The value of a small group discussion is in the discussion. http://bit.ly/lJTrTd #GoodToTalk
      2011-05-05 20:16:49 UTC

    • Guidelines for Leveraging Collective Knowledge and Insight by Nancy Dixon http://bit.ly/kvwm7z #KM #GoodToTalk
      2011-05-05 20:11:49 UTC

    • RT @elsua: Goodness! Everyone who uses the Web on a regular basis should watch this awesome TED Talk! HT @rhappe http://bit.ly/krrYrh
      2011-05-04 20:24:42 UTC

    • Lessig: Just how badly have we messed up the architecture of access to scientific knowledge? http://bit.ly/lLycbx #KM
      2011-05-04 20:02:13 UTC

    • 'Activity Streams' Will Be the Glue of Your Online Life http://bit.ly/ldfN4b
      2011-05-04 19:55:14 UTC

    • Why Activity Streams Will Save You From Information Overload by @elsua http://bit.ly/kfQBn7 #KM
      2011-05-04 19:41:46 UTC

    • How to connect people in large group settings http://bit.ly/iLEGfd #facilitation
      2011-05-04 19:37:15 UTC

    • Social tools require people to observe the world, make sense of it, and convey that sense to others by @euan http://bit.ly/l1bWk8
      2011-05-04 19:35:53 UTC

    • Retweet of Michael Sampson (collabguy)
      Encourage the Quieter People to Speak: Do or Don't? #collaboration #facilitation @davidgurteen http://bit.ly/jfTEnX
      2011-04-29 14:28:28 UTC



    Wednesday 27 April 2011

    18:54 GDTPermanent link to #Solve these whispering problems before they become bellowing ones!# Solve these whispering problems before they become bellowing ones! - Comments (0)

    When she first came to MIT, Khalea Robinson was set to become a builder of bridges and skyscrapers. "Their visibility and permanence appealed to me." But a talk she attended on some of the world's pressing problems shook her commitment to this path. Access to clean water, and other issues, should surely count more than her own private engineering goals, she imagined.

    But after taking introductory courses in environmental and civil engineering, she realized that she "couldn't simply fall in line wherever there was a call, because there are so many calls, all of them worthy." Robinson felt that she should instead look for a field that would "bring forth my initiative, passion, drive, insight and courage," while also promoting justice and fairness. In a world "full of complex problems that need to be solved by many people," Robinson believes each of us "has a distinct voice that can and must be raised."



    Wednesday 27 April 2011

    18:50 GDTPermanent link to #Are KM, Enterprise 2.0 and Social Business: One and The Same?# Are KM, Enterprise 2.0 and Social Business: One and The Same? - Comments (0)

    Here is a rather interesting blog post from Luis Suarez on KM, Enterprise 2.0 and Social Business: One and The Same in which he quotes from my recent keynote talk at KM Middle east Don't do KM.

    He concludes with the following:

    If you thought that Enterprise 2.0 or Social Business do not have much to do with traditional Knowledge Management, after going through David's excellent presentation, I guess we will have to think about it once again, because, in my opinion, it surely has. In fact, if folks have stated how Enterprise 2.0 is the father of Social Business I would venture to say that KM is the father and grandfather of E2.0 and Social Business, respectively.

    Credit: Luis Suarez


    Here is my take as to whether KM, Enterprise 2.0 and Social Business are One and The Same.

    Wednesday 27 April 2011

    18:19 GDTPermanent link to #KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011# KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011 - Comments (0)

    I am delighted that I will be chairing KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011 later this year (18 - 21 July in Sydney). And there is one very good reason - Ark Group Australia have agreed with me to make it a "conversational event". This is what they say on their website:

    "The conversational format of this event is intended to create an informal, relaxed atmosphere in which you, the conference participants, can get to know each other, learn from each other and build relationships. Each speaker will conclude their presentation with a question and a short time will be given over to conversation where you can discuss the speakers talk and the question at your tables before going into a traditional Q&A. "

    This was partly inspired by the way I prefer conferences to be run and how I have chaired them in the past such as at KM UK 2007 and KM UK 2009 but also by this blog post A Knowledge Management Conference that Actually Used KM Principles by Nancy Dixon.

    It falls well short of being an Unconference or BarCamp or even having Unpresenters but its a step in the right direction.

    If you live in the region - do come along - it should be a great KM event.
    ,
    18:19 GDTPermanent link to #KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011# KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011 - Comments (0)

    I am delighted that I will be chairing KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011 later this year (18 - 21 July in Sydney). And there is one very good reason - Ark Group Australia have agreed with me to make it a "conversational event". This is what they say on their website:

    "The conversational format of this event is intended to create an informal, relaxed atmosphere in which you, the conference participants, can get to know each other, learn from each other and build relationships. Each speaker will conclude their presentation with a question and a short time will be given over to conversation where you can discuss the speakers talk and the question at your tables before going into a traditional Q&A. "

    This was partly inspired by the way I prefer conferences to be run and how I have chaired them in the past such as at KM UK 2007 and KM UK 2009 but also by this blog post A Knowledge Management Conference that Actually Used KM Principles by Nancy Dixon.

    It falls well short of being an Unconference or BarCamp or even having Unpresenters but its a step in the right direction.

    If you live in the region - do come along - it should be a great KM event.
    ,
    18:19 GDTPermanent link to #KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011# KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011 - Comments (0)

    I am delighted that I will be chairing KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011 later this year (18 - 21 July in Sydney). And there is one very good reason - Ark Group Australia have agreed with me to make it a "conversational event". This is what they say on their website:

    "The conversational format of this event is intended to create an informal, relaxed atmosphere in which you, the conference participants, can get to know each other, learn from each other and build relationships. Each speaker will conclude their presentation with a question and a short time will be given over to conversation where you can discuss the speakers talk and the question at your tables before going into a traditional Q&A. "

    This was partly inspired by the way I prefer conferences to be run and how I have chaired them in the past such as at KM UK 2007 and KM UK 2009 but also by this blog post A Knowledge Management Conference that Actually Used KM Principles by Nancy Dixon.

    It falls well short of being an Unconference or BarCamp or even having Unpresenters but its a step in the right direction.

    If you live in the region - do come along - it should be a great KM event.
    ,
    18:19 GDTPermanent link to #KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011# KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011 - Comments (0)

    I am delighted that I will be chairing KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011 later this year (18 - 21 July in Sydney). And there is one very good reason - Ark Group Australia have agreed with me to make it a "conversational event". This is what they say on their website:

    "The conversational format of this event is intended to create an informal, relaxed atmosphere in which you, the conference participants, can get to know each other, learn from each other and build relationships. Each speaker will conclude their presentation with a question and a short time will be given over to conversation where you can discuss the speakers talk and the question at your tables before going into a traditional Q&A. "

    This was partly inspired by the way I prefer conferences to be run and how I have chaired them in the past such as at KM UK 2007 and KM UK 2009 but also by this blog post A Knowledge Management Conference that Actually Used KM Principles by Nancy Dixon.

    It falls well short of being an Unconference or BarCamp or even having Unpresenters but its a step in the right direction.

    If you live in the region - do come along - it should be a great KM event.
    ,
    18:19 GDTPermanent link to #KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011# KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011 - Comments (0)

    I am delighted that I will be chairing KM Australia - Asia Pacific Congress 2011 later this year (18 - 21 July in Sydney). And there is one very good reason - Ark Group Australia have agreed with me to make it a "conversational event". This is what they say on their website:

    "The conversational format of this event is intended to create an informal, relaxed atmosphere in which you, the conference participants, can get to know each other, learn from each other and build relationships. Each speaker will conclude their presentation with a question and a short time will be given over to conversation where you can discuss the speakers talk and the question at your tables before going into a traditional Q&A. "

    This was partly inspired by the way I prefer conferences to be run and how I have chaired them in the past such as at KM UK 2007 and KM UK 2009 but also by this blog post A Knowledge Management Conference that Actually Used KM Principles by Nancy Dixon.

    It falls well short of being an Unconference or BarCamp or even having Unpresenters but its a step in the right direction.

    If you live in the region - do come along - it should be a great KM event.

    Wednesday 27 April 2011

    14:44 GDTPermanent link to #Balancing Contributions During Face-to-Face Collaboration# Balancing Contributions During Face-to-Face Collaboration - Comments (0)

    Take a look at this Balancing Contributions During Face-to-Face Collaboration and see what you think.

    My first reaction was one of horror. But when I read the actual paper An Interactive Table for Supporting Participation Balance in Face-to-Face Collaboration, I calmed down a little. The researchers seem to know what they are doing and recognise the limitations and pitfalls of this sort of technology. Though I'd still rather that people better understood their own conversational styles and were more aware during their conversations so that this type of technology was never needed.

    On thing, I think never works, whether its a facilitator or technology, is trying to explicitly draw the quieter people into the conversation. In my experience if they feel they are being coaxed, encouraged or otherwise manipulated, they withdraw even more. I think the best approach is simply to create an ultra-safe environment, sit back and wait. If they are ever going to, they will emerge in their own time.
    ,
    14:44 GDTPermanent link to #Balancing Contributions During Face-to-Face Collaboration# Balancing Contributions During Face-to-Face Collaboration - Comments (0)

    Take a look at this Balancing Contributions During Face-to-Face Collaboration and see what you think.

    My first reaction was one of horror. But when I read the actual paper An Interactive Table for Supporting Participation Balance in Face-to-Face Collaboration, I calmed down a little. The researchers seem to know what they are doing and recognise the limitations and pitfalls of this sort of technology. Though I'd still rather that people better understood their own conversational styles and were more aware during their conversations so that this type of technology was never needed.

    On thing, I think never works, whether its a facilitator or technology, is trying to explicitly draw the quieter people into the conversation. In my experience if they feel they are being coaxed, encouraged or otherwise manipulated, they withdraw even more. I think the best approach is simply to create an ultra-safe environment, sit back and wait. If they are ever going to, they will emerge in their own time.

    Wednesday 27 April 2011

    11:32 GDTPermanent link to #Hot knowledge tweets: April 2011# Hot knowledge tweets: April 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for March - April 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • Conversational writing kicks formal writing's ass http://bit.ly/7mmK8Q
      2011-04-26 09:15:42 UTC

    • RT @DanielPink: This month's Sunday Telegraph Column: Why you should heed Peters & Collins & create a "to-dont" list. http://t.co/iDYWpbA
      2011-04-24 22:10:34 UTC

    • Wow! I have just discovered "Unpresenting" http://bit.ly/fuccFs #like #KCafe #GoodToTalk
      2011-04-23 10:22:43 UTC

    • RT @stoweboyd: Font Size May Not Aid Learning but Its Style Can - Benedict Carey http://sto.ly/gB0YV8 Deep thought is the best learning tool
      2011-04-21 11:42:09 UTC

    • RT @rossdawson: Serendipity is at the heart of today's emerging society http://bit.ly/eK9pwU
      2011-04-21 11:30:17 UTC

    • RT @euan: business is about doing stuff and social media is talking about the stuff you are doing. Doesn't have to be hard.
      2011-04-21 07:01:20 UTC

    • What people seem to be responsive to is driving toward purpose http://bit.ly/gTWa00
      2011-04-18 09:00:33 UTC

    • If you care about Education - Watch this! http://bit.ly/e8iTUh
      2011-04-16 12:11:14 UTC

    • All languages traced to African 'mother tongue' http://bit.ly/eO06jh
      2011-04-16 11:40:56 UTC

    • Have you ever thought about how completely irrelevant structured learning is? http://bit.ly/g0Wu5q
      2011-04-16 09:35:45 UTC

    • How do you structure a conversation to lead to powerful, creative + practical conclusions http://bit.ly/gb9Vhh #GoodToTalk
      2011-04-15 07:48:00 UTC

    • The bonus myth: How paying for results can backfire - 06 April 2011 - New Scientist http://bit.ly/iioHBg #NoRewards
      2011-04-15 07:24:48 UTC

    • Carrots and Sticks Don’t Work (respect does) http://bit.ly/hxzoEP #NoRewards
      2011-04-14 13:29:57 UTC

    • Dear Google: You Can’t Threaten People Into Being Social http://bit.ly/guR3QO #NoRewards
      2011-04-14 09:40:45 UTC

    • Forget Motivating Staff With Incentives http://bit.ly/fl5mQJ #NoRewards
      2011-04-13 17:46:59 UTC

    • RT @guijti Shocking statistics on female infanticide in India. http://www.oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/?p=5065
      2011-04-13 09:23:43 UTC

    • Short film illustrates power of words to radically change your message + your effect upon the world http://bit.ly/hYPTMT /via @elsua
      2011-04-13 07:39:52 UTC

    • Rewards get gamed - watch this potty training video http://bit.ly/fBykkc #NoRewards
      2011-04-11 15:24:03 UTC

    • Is knowledge management failed or simply a fad? Studies suggest the concept is alive and well. http://bit.ly/gOrs5s #KM
      2011-04-10 13:53:44 UTC

    • Knowledge Management is Older than you Think http://bit.ly/gcMwF2 #KM
      2011-04-02 10:58:12 UTC

    • We need your help...The Knowledge Management Observatory™ Global 2011 Survey http://linkd.in/fzLwLl #KM
      2011-03-30 14:42:08 UTC

    • Can you spot a story? The Story Test. http://bit.ly/eiRXW8 #KM
      2011-03-30 13:52:41 UTC

    • KM, Enterprise 2.0 and Social Business: One and The Same by @elsua http://bit.ly/fwf6Nz #KM
      2011-03-30 13:51:12 UTC

    • The New Edge in Knowledge by Carla O'Dell http://bit.ly/h2EFLJ Book review by @JackVinson #KM
      2011-03-27 15:23:07 UTC

    • How Barefoot College is empowering women through peer-to-peer learning and technology http://bit.ly/hvTKP3 #SocialGood #GirlEffect
      2011-03-26 09:13:30 UTC

    • RT @maggiedoyne: 3.3 billion girls and women = 3.3 billion ways to change the world. http://bit.ly/fuLSkg @girls20summit #girleffect
      2011-03-26 07:13:30 UTC


    ,
    11:32 GDTPermanent link to #Hot knowledge tweets: April 2011# Hot knowledge tweets: April 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for March - April 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • Conversational writing kicks formal writing's ass http://bit.ly/7mmK8Q
      2011-04-26 09:15:42 UTC

    • RT @DanielPink: This month's Sunday Telegraph Column: Why you should heed Peters & Collins & create a "to-dont" list. http://t.co/iDYWpbA
      2011-04-24 22:10:34 UTC

    • Wow! I have just discovered "Unpresenting" http://bit.ly/fuccFs #like #KCafe #GoodToTalk
      2011-04-23 10:22:43 UTC

    • RT @stoweboyd: Font Size May Not Aid Learning but Its Style Can - Benedict Carey http://sto.ly/gB0YV8 Deep thought is the best learning tool
      2011-04-21 11:42:09 UTC

    • RT @rossdawson: Serendipity is at the heart of today's emerging society http://bit.ly/eK9pwU
      2011-04-21 11:30:17 UTC

    • RT @euan: business is about doing stuff and social media is talking about the stuff you are doing. Doesn't have to be hard.
      2011-04-21 07:01:20 UTC

    • What people seem to be responsive to is driving toward purpose http://bit.ly/gTWa00
      2011-04-18 09:00:33 UTC

    • If you care about Education - Watch this! http://bit.ly/e8iTUh
      2011-04-16 12:11:14 UTC

    • All languages traced to African 'mother tongue' http://bit.ly/eO06jh
      2011-04-16 11:40:56 UTC

    • Have you ever thought about how completely irrelevant structured learning is? http://bit.ly/g0Wu5q
      2011-04-16 09:35:45 UTC

    • How do you structure a conversation to lead to powerful, creative + practical conclusions http://bit.ly/gb9Vhh #GoodToTalk
      2011-04-15 07:48:00 UTC

    • The bonus myth: How paying for results can backfire - 06 April 2011 - New Scientist http://bit.ly/iioHBg #NoRewards
      2011-04-15 07:24:48 UTC

    • Carrots and Sticks Don’t Work (respect does) http://bit.ly/hxzoEP #NoRewards
      2011-04-14 13:29:57 UTC

    • Dear Google: You Can’t Threaten People Into Being Social http://bit.ly/guR3QO #NoRewards
      2011-04-14 09:40:45 UTC

    • Forget Motivating Staff With Incentives http://bit.ly/fl5mQJ #NoRewards
      2011-04-13 17:46:59 UTC

    • RT @guijti Shocking statistics on female infanticide in India. http://www.oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/?p=5065
      2011-04-13 09:23:43 UTC

    • Short film illustrates power of words to radically change your message + your effect upon the world http://bit.ly/hYPTMT /via @elsua
      2011-04-13 07:39:52 UTC

    • Rewards get gamed - watch this potty training video http://bit.ly/fBykkc #NoRewards
      2011-04-11 15:24:03 UTC

    • Is knowledge management failed or simply a fad? Studies suggest the concept is alive and well. http://bit.ly/gOrs5s #KM
      2011-04-10 13:53:44 UTC

    • Knowledge Management is Older than you Think http://bit.ly/gcMwF2 #KM
      2011-04-02 10:58:12 UTC

    • We need your help...The Knowledge Management Observatory™ Global 2011 Survey http://linkd.in/fzLwLl #KM
      2011-03-30 14:42:08 UTC

    • Can you spot a story? The Story Test. http://bit.ly/eiRXW8 #KM
      2011-03-30 13:52:41 UTC

    • KM, Enterprise 2.0 and Social Business: One and The Same by @elsua http://bit.ly/fwf6Nz #KM
      2011-03-30 13:51:12 UTC

    • The New Edge in Knowledge by Carla O'Dell http://bit.ly/h2EFLJ Book review by @JackVinson #KM
      2011-03-27 15:23:07 UTC

    • How Barefoot College is empowering women through peer-to-peer learning and technology http://bit.ly/hvTKP3 #SocialGood #GirlEffect
      2011-03-26 09:13:30 UTC

    • RT @maggiedoyne: 3.3 billion girls and women = 3.3 billion ways to change the world. http://bit.ly/fuLSkg @girls20summit #girleffect
      2011-03-26 07:13:30 UTC


    ,
    11:32 GDTPermanent link to #Hot knowledge tweets: April 2011# Hot knowledge tweets: April 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for March - April 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • Conversational writing kicks formal writing's ass http://bit.ly/7mmK8Q
      2011-04-26 09:15:42 UTC

    • RT @DanielPink: This month's Sunday Telegraph Column: Why you should heed Peters & Collins & create a "to-dont" list. http://t.co/iDYWpbA
      2011-04-24 22:10:34 UTC

    • Wow! I have just discovered "Unpresenting" http://bit.ly/fuccFs #like #KCafe #GoodToTalk
      2011-04-23 10:22:43 UTC

    • RT @stoweboyd: Font Size May Not Aid Learning but Its Style Can - Benedict Carey http://sto.ly/gB0YV8 Deep thought is the best learning tool
      2011-04-21 11:42:09 UTC

    • RT @rossdawson: Serendipity is at the heart of today's emerging society http://bit.ly/eK9pwU
      2011-04-21 11:30:17 UTC

    • RT @euan: business is about doing stuff and social media is talking about the stuff you are doing. Doesn't have to be hard.
      2011-04-21 07:01:20 UTC

    • What people seem to be responsive to is driving toward purpose http://bit.ly/gTWa00
      2011-04-18 09:00:33 UTC

    • If you care about Education - Watch this! http://bit.ly/e8iTUh
      2011-04-16 12:11:14 UTC

    • All languages traced to African 'mother tongue' http://bit.ly/eO06jh
      2011-04-16 11:40:56 UTC

    • Have you ever thought about how completely irrelevant structured learning is? http://bit.ly/g0Wu5q
      2011-04-16 09:35:45 UTC

    • How do you structure a conversation to lead to powerful, creative + practical conclusions http://bit.ly/gb9Vhh #GoodToTalk
      2011-04-15 07:48:00 UTC

    • The bonus myth: How paying for results can backfire - 06 April 2011 - New Scientist http://bit.ly/iioHBg #NoRewards
      2011-04-15 07:24:48 UTC

    • Carrots and Sticks Don’t Work (respect does) http://bit.ly/hxzoEP #NoRewards
      2011-04-14 13:29:57 UTC

    • Dear Google: You Can’t Threaten People Into Being Social http://bit.ly/guR3QO #NoRewards
      2011-04-14 09:40:45 UTC

    • Forget Motivating Staff With Incentives http://bit.ly/fl5mQJ #NoRewards
      2011-04-13 17:46:59 UTC

    • RT @guijti Shocking statistics on female infanticide in India. http://www.oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/?p=5065
      2011-04-13 09:23:43 UTC

    • Short film illustrates power of words to radically change your message + your effect upon the world http://bit.ly/hYPTMT /via @elsua
      2011-04-13 07:39:52 UTC

    • Rewards get gamed - watch this potty training video http://bit.ly/fBykkc #NoRewards
      2011-04-11 15:24:03 UTC

    • Is knowledge management failed or simply a fad? Studies suggest the concept is alive and well. http://bit.ly/gOrs5s #KM
      2011-04-10 13:53:44 UTC

    • Knowledge Management is Older than you Think http://bit.ly/gcMwF2 #KM
      2011-04-02 10:58:12 UTC

    • We need your help...The Knowledge Management Observatory™ Global 2011 Survey http://linkd.in/fzLwLl #KM
      2011-03-30 14:42:08 UTC

    • Can you spot a story? The Story Test. http://bit.ly/eiRXW8 #KM
      2011-03-30 13:52:41 UTC

    • KM, Enterprise 2.0 and Social Business: One and The Same by @elsua http://bit.ly/fwf6Nz #KM
      2011-03-30 13:51:12 UTC

    • The New Edge in Knowledge by Carla O'Dell http://bit.ly/h2EFLJ Book review by @JackVinson #KM
      2011-03-27 15:23:07 UTC

    • How Barefoot College is empowering women through peer-to-peer learning and technology http://bit.ly/hvTKP3 #SocialGood #GirlEffect
      2011-03-26 09:13:30 UTC

    • RT @maggiedoyne: 3.3 billion girls and women = 3.3 billion ways to change the world. http://bit.ly/fuLSkg @girls20summit #girleffect
      2011-03-26 07:13:30 UTC



    Wednesday 27 April 2011

    10:49 GDTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn has grown by over 120 members from 2,289 members last month to 2,417 today and is amazingly active ... I don't get much time to take part in the discussions myself but there are some great ones taking place.

    Here are three interesting ones that you might like to take a look at or join in:


    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join and the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539
    ,
    10:49 GDTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn has grown by over 120 members from 2,289 members last month to 2,417 today and is amazingly active ... I don't get much time to take part in the discussions myself but there are some great ones taking place.

    Here are three interesting ones that you might like to take a look at or join in:


    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join and the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539

    Wednesday 27 April 2011

    09:04 GDTPermanent link to #PhotoSync: Syncs my Flickr Photos to Facebook# PhotoSync: Syncs my Flickr Photos to Facebook - Comments (0)

    I usually take lots of photos at conferences and my knowledge cafes and for some years have been uploading them to Flickr. Some time ago, I regretted doing that as Facebook is by far the most social place to upload photos. Not only do more people get to see them on Facebook but the ability to tag the people in the photos is just brilliant.

    But what should I do? It would take me an age to upload all my past Flickr photos to Facebook and in any case, Flickr made a much better backup for my photos as it held them at full resolution. So I continued to upload my photos to Flickr and just a select few to Facebook. Up until the other day, that is, when I discovered PhotoSync.

    This is just an amazing little program. I connect it to my Flickr and Facebook accounts; tell it what sets (folders) of photos I want to sync and then it just goes away and syncs my Flickr photos with Facebook. Awesome! So if you are following me on Facebook and have seen all the photos pop up ... its all down to PhotoSync.

    The app seems a little buggy right now ... I get a number of error messages every time I use it but despite the messages it still seems to work!

    I love it! And I have a lot more photos to copy across ... just doing a few folders at a time for now. I also have a whole backlog of photos I have not uploaded. Maybe I have a litle more motivation now.
    ,
    09:04 GDTPermanent link to #PhotoSync: Syncs my Flickr Photos to Facebook# PhotoSync: Syncs my Flickr Photos to Facebook - Comments (0)

    I usually take lots of photos at conferences and my knowledge cafes and for some years have been uploading them to Flickr. Some time ago, I regretted doing that as Facebook is by far the most social place to upload photos. Not only do more people get to see them on Facebook but the ability to tag the people in the photos is just brilliant.

    But what should I do? It would take me an age to upload all my past Flickr photos to Facebook and in any case, Flickr made a much better backup for my photos as it held them at full resolution. So I continued to upload my photos to Flickr and just a select few to Facebook. Up until the other day, that is, when I discovered PhotoSync.

    This is just an amazing little program. I connect it to my Flickr and Facebook accounts; tell it what sets (folders) of photos I want to sync and then it just goes away and syncs my Flickr photos with Facebook. Awesome! So if you are following me on Facebook and have seen all the photos pop up ... its all down to PhotoSync.

    The app seems a little buggy right now ... I get a number of error messages every time I use it but despite the messages it still seems to work!

    I love it! And I have a lot more photos to copy across ... just doing a few folders at a time for now. I also have a whole backlog of photos I have not uploaded. Maybe I have a litle more motivation now.
    ,
    09:04 GDTPermanent link to #PhotoSync: Syncs my Flickr Photos to Facebook# PhotoSync: Syncs my Flickr Photos to Facebook - Comments (0)

    I usually take lots of photos at conferences and my knowledge cafes and for some years have been uploading them to Flickr. Some time ago, I regretted doing that as Facebook is by far the most social place to upload photos. Not only do more people get to see them on Facebook but the ability to tag the people in the photos is just brilliant.

    But what should I do? It would take me an age to upload all my past Flickr photos to Facebook and in any case, Flickr made a much better backup for my photos as it held them at full resolution. So I continued to upload my photos to Flickr and just a select few to Facebook. Up until the other day, that is, when I discovered PhotoSync.

    This is just an amazing little program. I connect it to my Flickr and Facebook accounts; tell it what sets (folders) of photos I want to sync and then it just goes away and syncs my Flickr photos with Facebook. Awesome! So if you are following me on Facebook and have seen all the photos pop up ... its all down to PhotoSync.

    The app seems a little buggy right now ... I get a number of error messages every time I use it but despite the messages it still seems to work!

    I love it! And I have a lot more photos to copy across ... just doing a few folders at a time for now. I also have a whole backlog of photos I have not uploaded. Maybe I have a litle more motivation now.

    Saturday 2 April 2011

    11:24 GDTPermanent link to #Introduction to the April 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the April 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    You may have noticed that I am starting to put a lot more effort into my Knowledge Cafes. They started out as a response to what I saw as death-by-power-point presentations. In the beginning (I ran my first Knowledge Cafe in London in September 2002) I simply wanted to make such presentations more conversational. But as I have run them and taught people how to run them all over the world I have discovered that they can be adapted to different purposes and are far more powerful than I ever realised ten years ago.

    I will be running many more Knowledge Cafes in London in coming months and also around the UK, the rest of Europe and off course during my travels across the globe. I will also be running more Knowledge Cafe Masterclasses where I teach people how to adapt and run them for varying business purposes. The first of my regional Knowledge Cafes will be in Winchester on 10th May and I will be running a Knowledge Cafe Masterclass in Edinburgh on 7th June

    To help share and develop knowledge in running Knowledge Cafes, I have recently created the Gurteen Knowledge Cafe Forum. This is a LinkedIn subgroup of the Gurteen Knowledge Community on LinkedIn.

    So if you are interested in running Knowledge Cafes then join the group. And if you would like to learn more about the Cafes first hand - come along to one of my events.

    No Knowledge Cafes in your neck of the woods! Then invite me to come and run one :-)

    Sunday 27 March 2011

    13:57 GDTPermanent link to #KM Middle East# KM Middle East - Comments (0)

    There has been three major KM conferences in the Middle East in recent months that I have been privileged to attend:
    There is also The 8th International Conference on Knowledge Management (ICKM) coming up in Jordan in September of this year.

    All three events have been excellent; they have been well attended (KM Iran had over 900 participants) and the participation has been exceptional. I have also loved the warmth and hospitality of the Arab people.

    KM Middle East in Abu Dhabi was the most recent and let me share some of the resources with you
    What with everything else going on in the Middle East - its hard not to wonder if there is a connection. If there is one, then to my mind, it has got to be about the intrinsic human thirst for knowledge and for freedom.
    ,
    13:57 GDTPermanent link to #KM Middle East# KM Middle East - Comments (0)

    There has been three major KM conferences in the Middle East in recent months that I have been privileged to attend:
    There is also The 8th International Conference on Knowledge Management (ICKM) coming up in Jordan in September of this year.

    All three events have been excellent; they have been well attended (KM Iran had over 900 participants) and the participation has been exceptional. I have also loved the warmth and hospitality of the Arab people.

    KM Middle East in Abu Dhabi was the most recent and let me share some of the resources with you
    What with everything else going on in the Middle East - its hard not to wonder if there is a connection. If there is one, then to my mind, it has got to be about the intrinsic human thirst for knowledge and for freedom.
    ,
    13:57 GDTPermanent link to #KM Middle East# KM Middle East - Comments (0)

    There has been three major KM conferences in the Middle East in recent months that I have been privileged to attend:
    There is also The 8th International Conference on Knowledge Management (ICKM) coming up in Jordan in September of this year.

    All three events have been excellent; they have been well attended (KM Iran had over 900 participants) and the participation has been exceptional. I have also loved the warmth and hospitality of the Arab people.

    KM Middle East in Abu Dhabi was the most recent and let me share some of the resources with you
    What with everything else going on in the Middle East - its hard not to wonder if there is a connection. If there is one, then to my mind, it has got to be about the intrinsic human thirst for knowledge and for freedom.
    ,
    13:57 GDTPermanent link to #KM Middle East# KM Middle East - Comments (0)

    There has been three major KM conferences in the Middle East in recent months that I have been privileged to attend:
    There is also The 8th International Conference on Knowledge Management (ICKM) coming up in Jordan in September of this year.

    All three events have been excellent; they have been well attended (KM Iran had over 900 participants) and the participation has been exceptional. I have also loved the warmth and hospitality of the Arab people.

    KM Middle East in Abu Dhabi was the most recent and let me share some of the resources with you
    What with everything else going on in the Middle East - its hard not to wonder if there is a connection. If there is one, then to my mind, it has got to be about the intrinsic human thirst for knowledge and for freedom.
    ,
    13:57 GDTPermanent link to #KM Middle East# KM Middle East - Comments (0)

    There has been three major KM conferences in the Middle East in recent months that I have been privileged to attend:
    There is also The 8th International Conference on Knowledge Management (ICKM) coming up in Jordan in September of this year.

    All three events have been excellent; they have been well attended (KM Iran had over 900 participants) and the participation has been exceptional. I have also loved the warmth and hospitality of the Arab people.

    KM Middle East in Abu Dhabi was the most recent and let me share some of the resources with you
    What with everything else going on in the Middle East - its hard not to wonder if there is a connection. If there is one, then to my mind, it has got to be about the intrinsic human thirst for knowledge and for freedom.
    ,
    13:57 GDTPermanent link to #KM Middle East# KM Middle East - Comments (0)

    There has been three major KM conferences in the Middle East in recent months that I have been privileged to attend:
    There is also The 8th International Conference on Knowledge Management (ICKM) coming up in Jordan in September of this year.

    All three events have been excellent; they have been well attended (KM Iran had over 900 participants) and the participation has been exceptional. I have also loved the warmth and hospitality of the Arab people.

    KM Middle East in Abu Dhabi was the most recent and let me share some of the resources with you
    What with everything else going on in the Middle East - its hard not to wonder if there is a connection. If there is one, then to my mind, it has got to be about the intrinsic human thirst for knowledge and for freedom.
    ,
    13:57 GDTPermanent link to #KM Middle East# KM Middle East - Comments (0)

    There has been three major KM conferences in the Middle East in recent months that I have been privileged to attend:
    There is also The 8th International Conference on Knowledge Management (ICKM) coming up in Jordan in September of this year.

    All three events have been excellent; they have been well attended (KM Iran had over 900 participants) and the participation has been exceptional. I have also loved the warmth and hospitality of the Arab people.

    KM Middle East in Abu Dhabi was the most recent and let me share some of the resources with you
    What with everything else going on in the Middle East - its hard not to wonder if there is a connection. If there is one, then to my mind, it has got to be about the intrinsic human thirst for knowledge and for freedom.

    Sunday 27 March 2011

    12:52 GDTPermanent link to #Why are so few KM events done over the web?# Why are so few KM events done over the web? - Comments (0)

    A month or so back Matthew Loxton started a discussion on the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin by asking the question "Why are so few KM events done over the web"

    This generated some fascinating discussion and lots of comments but the post that stood out for me was this reply by John Maloney. John can be a little blunt but that's his style - don't let it get in the way of the message :-)
    Hi - As probably the person that has conducted more face-to-face KM events, over the last three decades, than all others combined, arrival at the definitive answer to this question is easy.

    The bottom line is impact and outcome.

    Same-time, different-place (STDP), different-time, different-place (DTDP) and different-time, same-place (DTSP), aka, Webinars, eLearning, Learning Centers, etc., are excellent for deterministic impact and outcomes. These are activities where the outcome is known. Thinks like certification training, operations, policy diffusion, 'best practices,' etc. These complicated activities are well-served by technology.

    Same-time, same-place (STSP) is for non-deterministic impact and outcomes. This is where the outcome is unknown, emergent, complex. These are creative activities like design, relationships, strategy, etc. These complex activities depend on authentic conversation, genuine collaboration, diversity, personal interactions, trust, ongoing relationships, etc.

    There are NO exceptions to these rules. Unfortunately, KM people aren't very good at leading these activities. The main and classic problem they have, is, of course, leading-with-technology. Never worked, never will. People matter.

    KM is about Creating the Future. Thus, by definition, ALL worthwhile KM activities must be STSP.

    To be honest and blunt, it make no difference what you think people enjoy or value. What matters is impact and outcome. No exceptions. People will serve the social networks that best serve their goals and objectives. Guidance and configuration are certainly welcome.

    Fortunately, the KM trend line is favoring STSP. Social media, communities, CoPs, etc., are great KM practices in-so-far as they serve STSP KM. That's good news and all KMers should be encouraged!

    Again, build and strengthen your STDP, DTSP and DTSP programs and activities for training.

    For KM, STSP carries the day. Always has, always will.

    This is among the key themes of the Network Singularity ...

    http://www.networksingularity.com

    Thanks to all for the thread.

    P.S. To anwser the specific question, in proper social media vernacular --

    Q: Why are so few KM events done over the web?
    A: Because they s-u-c-k.


    Credit: John Maloney

    I agree with so much of this and the thinking is behind much of the rationale for my Gurteen Knowledge Cafes. To my mind nothing beats face-to-face authentic conversation.

    I must admit I love John's bottom line! I liked Al Simard's response also:

    I tend to agree with John's view, although I put it a bit differently. In my experience, at the beginning of a group process (even if it is reasonably known), members need to develop a trust in the other participants. Humans have been doing this since we existed as a distinct species. We're hard-wired to do it through face-to face encounters; it is really hard to do electronically. It is also essential to get through what I call the "mating dance" in which everyone puts his wants and grievances on the table. This can either be done at the outset, in a planned way and informative way, or it will happen latter in an unplanned and disruptive way.

    But, when a process is unstructured or unknown, I have found that face-to-face dialogues are virtually essential to first wander and then spiral around a subject towards a common understanding. I have found that sitting around a table in a dialogue group is far more effective than doing this electronically.

    I have met people at conferences that I've corresponded with electronically for years. Somehow that face-to-face meeting added something intangible yet palpable to our relationship. I'm sure psychologists have a word for it. But, like tacit knowledge, although I can't name it, I have felt it.


    Yes, Al, there is often something magic in a face-to-face meeting.

    What do you think? You can join in the discussion on the forum

    Sunday 27 March 2011

    11:58 GDTPermanent link to #Don Don't do KM! - Comments (0)

    My recent keynote talk at KM Middle East was titled Dont do KM. You can find the slides on SlideShare.

    This was clearly a provocative, catchy marketing title but I had a very strong message nevertheless! It was based on a talk I gave at the HK KMS Conference in 2010 which was titled less provocatively "Making KM Projects Work". Kim Sbarcea blogged about it and her post sums up my views on the matter quite well..

    Naguib Chowdhury picked up on my recent presentation in Abu Dhabi and blogged Don’t do KM - then let’s not have a term called- KM! Naguib, pretty much supports what I have to say but adds at the end of his post:
    So, David is right. Let us not do KM as a project itself, it is embedded in the organization already. But then I cannot call David a KMer or we cannot have any conference/forum called KM!


    I think this is meant to be toungue-in-cheek, but let me answer it any way. This is a step too far. I am not advocating we get rid of KM or even that we adopt a stealth approach.

    So often when people start a so called KM initiative they ask the question "How do we do KM?" and "What are the benefits?". To my mind this is the wrong place to start. We should start with the question "What are the business problems we are facing and how can KM help." This ensures a sharp focus on business outcomes. The benefits? - well they are your desired outcomes. Simple really! Hence "Don't do KM!"

    I have written more on this subject in Inside Knowledge Magazine see: What keeps your CEO awake at night?
    ,
    11:58 GDTPermanent link to #Don Don't do KM! - Comments (0)

    My recent keynote talk at KM Middle East was titled Dont do KM. You can find the slides on SlideShare.

    This was clearly a provocative, catchy marketing title but I had a very strong message nevertheless! It was based on a talk I gave at the HK KMS Conference in 2010 which was titled less provocatively "Making KM Projects Work". Kim Sbarcea blogged about it and her post sums up my views on the matter quite well..

    Naguib Chowdhury picked up on my recent presentation in Abu Dhabi and blogged Don’t do KM - then let’s not have a term called- KM! Naguib, pretty much supports what I have to say but adds at the end of his post:
    So, David is right. Let us not do KM as a project itself, it is embedded in the organization already. But then I cannot call David a KMer or we cannot have any conference/forum called KM!


    I think this is meant to be toungue-in-cheek, but let me answer it any way. This is a step too far. I am not advocating we get rid of KM or even that we adopt a stealth approach.

    So often when people start a so called KM initiative they ask the question "How do we do KM?" and "What are the benefits?". To my mind this is the wrong place to start. We should start with the question "What are the business problems we are facing and how can KM help." This ensures a sharp focus on business outcomes. The benefits? - well they are your desired outcomes. Simple really! Hence "Don't do KM!"

    I have written more on this subject in Inside Knowledge Magazine see: What keeps your CEO awake at night?
    ,
    11:58 GDTPermanent link to #Don Don't do KM! - Comments (0)

    My recent keynote talk at KM Middle East was titled Dont do KM. You can find the slides on SlideShare.

    This was clearly a provocative, catchy marketing title but I had a very strong message nevertheless! It was based on a talk I gave at the HK KMS Conference in 2010 which was titled less provocatively "Making KM Projects Work". Kim Sbarcea blogged about it and her post sums up my views on the matter quite well..

    Naguib Chowdhury picked up on my recent presentation in Abu Dhabi and blogged Don’t do KM - then let’s not have a term called- KM! Naguib, pretty much supports what I have to say but adds at the end of his post:
    So, David is right. Let us not do KM as a project itself, it is embedded in the organization already. But then I cannot call David a KMer or we cannot have any conference/forum called KM!


    I think this is meant to be toungue-in-cheek, but let me answer it any way. This is a step too far. I am not advocating we get rid of KM or even that we adopt a stealth approach.

    So often when people start a so called KM initiative they ask the question "How do we do KM?" and "What are the benefits?". To my mind this is the wrong place to start. We should start with the question "What are the business problems we are facing and how can KM help." This ensures a sharp focus on business outcomes. The benefits? - well they are your desired outcomes. Simple really! Hence "Don't do KM!"

    I have written more on this subject in Inside Knowledge Magazine see: What keeps your CEO awake at night?
    ,
    11:58 GDTPermanent link to #Don Don't do KM! - Comments (0)

    My recent keynote talk at KM Middle East was titled Dont do KM. You can find the slides on SlideShare.

    This was clearly a provocative, catchy marketing title but I had a very strong message nevertheless! It was based on a talk I gave at the HK KMS Conference in 2010 which was titled less provocatively "Making KM Projects Work". Kim Sbarcea blogged about it and her post sums up my views on the matter quite well..

    Naguib Chowdhury picked up on my recent presentation in Abu Dhabi and blogged Don’t do KM - then let’s not have a term called- KM! Naguib, pretty much supports what I have to say but adds at the end of his post:
    So, David is right. Let us not do KM as a project itself, it is embedded in the organization already. But then I cannot call David a KMer or we cannot have any conference/forum called KM!


    I think this is meant to be toungue-in-cheek, but let me answer it any way. This is a step too far. I am not advocating we get rid of KM or even that we adopt a stealth approach.

    So often when people start a so called KM initiative they ask the question "How do we do KM?" and "What are the benefits?". To my mind this is the wrong place to start. We should start with the question "What are the business problems we are facing and how can KM help." This ensures a sharp focus on business outcomes. The benefits? - well they are your desired outcomes. Simple really! Hence "Don't do KM!"

    I have written more on this subject in Inside Knowledge Magazine see: What keeps your CEO awake at night?
    ,
    11:58 GDTPermanent link to #Don Don't do KM! - Comments (0)

    My recent keynote talk at KM Middle East was titled Dont do KM. You can find the slides on SlideShare.

    This was clearly a provocative, catchy marketing title but I had a very strong message nevertheless! It was based on a talk I gave at the HK KMS Conference in 2010 which was titled less provocatively "Making KM Projects Work". Kim Sbarcea blogged about it and her post sums up my views on the matter quite well..

    Naguib Chowdhury picked up on my recent presentation in Abu Dhabi and blogged Don’t do KM - then let’s not have a term called- KM! Naguib, pretty much supports what I have to say but adds at the end of his post:
    So, David is right. Let us not do KM as a project itself, it is embedded in the organization already. But then I cannot call David a KMer or we cannot have any conference/forum called KM!


    I think this is meant to be toungue-in-cheek, but let me answer it any way. This is a step too far. I am not advocating we get rid of KM or even that we adopt a stealth approach.

    So often when people start a so called KM initiative they ask the question "How do we do KM?" and "What are the benefits?". To my mind this is the wrong place to start. We should start with the question "What are the business problems we are facing and how can KM help." This ensures a sharp focus on business outcomes. The benefits? - well they are your desired outcomes. Simple really! Hence "Don't do KM!"

    I have written more on this subject in Inside Knowledge Magazine see: What keeps your CEO awake at night?

    Saturday 26 March 2011

    09:18 GMTPermanent link to #Hot knowledge tweets: March 2011# Hot knowledge tweets: March 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for Feb-Mar 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

    ,
    09:18 GMTPermanent link to #Hot knowledge tweets: March 2011# Hot knowledge tweets: March 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for Feb-Mar 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

    ,
    09:18 GMTPermanent link to #Hot knowledge tweets: March 2011# Hot knowledge tweets: March 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for Feb-Mar 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.


    Friday 25 March 2011

    14:23 GMTPermanent link to #Free online access to Knowledge Management Research & Practice (KMRP) Journal to 8th April# Free online access to Knowledge Management Research & Practice (KMRP) Journal to 8th April - Comments (0)

    Many of you will have made the most of the free online access to all the Palgrave Macmillan journals throughout March. If you weren't aware of the offer then you have only a few days left but access to the Knowledge Management Research & Practice (KMRP) Journal has been extended to April 8th. Here are some hot links.

    Enjoy :-)

    Friday 25 March 2011

    09:25 GMTPermanent link to #Matt Moore meets Nancy White# Matt Moore meets Nancy White - Comments (0)

    Matt Moore spoke to Nancy White recently as a prelude to her trip to Australia and recorded three video interviews.







    Friday 25 March 2011

    08:56 GMTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn has grown by over 100 members from 2,184 members last month to 2,289 today and is still one most active of all the KM LinkedIn groups.

    Here are three of the discussions taking place:

    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join and the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539
    ,
    08:56 GMTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn has grown by over 100 members from 2,184 members last month to 2,289 today and is still one most active of all the KM LinkedIn groups.

    Here are three of the discussions taking place:

    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join and the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539

    Friday 25 March 2011

    08:45 GMTPermanent link to #Introduction to the March 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the March 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    I have been travelling again, and at the KM Middle East conference in Abu Dhabi, as well as giving the keynote talk, I ran one of my Gurteen Knowledge Cafe workshops. During the workshop, one of the men, who was probably in his 40s, approached me and told me that he was from Saudi Arabia and that he had found it difficult to speak to the women at the tables.

    This had been the first time in his life that he had spoken to a woman other than his mother, his wife, his sister and two nieces. He had two brothers and had never spoken to their wives.

    He went on to say, that in his opinion, Saudi Arabian men and woman did not talk much within their families and thus there was thus little understanding of each other and a consequent lack of respect.

    I am well aware of the segregation of men and women in Saudi Arabia but the impact of this brought it home to me in a very personal way. I have often thought it would be good to bring men women together to discuss our differences in the safe, respectful setting of a Knowledge Cafe. One day I will but its unlikely to ever be in Saudi Arabia.

    Monday 21 February 2011

    13:15 GMTPermanent link to #Introduction to the February 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the February 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    I seem to be coming across many more articles and blog posts about the importance of face to face conversation these days. Here are three recent examples


    I have started to tweet or re-tweet them with a #GoodToTalk hashtag.

    If you come across similar posts then please tweet them with the same hashtag and we can share them.

    Monday 21 February 2011

    12:58 GMTPermanent link to #KM in the Middle East# KM in the Middle East - Comments (0)

    I have been privileged to participate in two KM conferences in the Middle East over the past six months and have met some lovely people.

    In a few weeks time I will be speaking at KM Middle East in Abu Dhabi. Later in the year there is a fourth KM conference in the region The 8th International Conference On Knowledge Management. in Jordan.

    The recent conference in Iran was an interesting event with about 800 participants (almost certainly the largest KM conference I have taken part in). You can see my photos on Facebook.

    So far I have seen lots of interest and enthusiasm for the subject and if the early mistakes, made elsewhere can be avoided, KM may have a bright future there.

    Monday 21 February 2011

    12:34 GMTPermanent link to #Latest Knowledge Cafes: London and Edinburgh# Latest Knowledge Cafes: London and Edinburgh - Comments (0)

    I held a great Knowledge Cafe in London last week with Richard McDermott as speaker/facilitator on the topic of What about Thinking? and Deloitte as hosts. Thank you Richard, thank you Deloitte and thanks to the 60+ participants.

    Here are couple of blog posts from the evening - thanks Ron and Rebecca.

    I have another open Cafe coming up in Edinburgh on Wednesday evening (24th Feb) when I will be in Edinburgh to run a private Knowledge Cafe at Edinburgh University. 40 people signed-up so far so should be a good one. Not to mention a Knowledge Cafe Masterclass at KM Middle East in a few weeks time.

    Monday 21 February 2011

    11:40 GMTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn has grown from 2,076 members last month to 2,184 today and looks to be the most active of all the KM LinkedIn groups.

    Here are a few of the interesting discussions taking place:
    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join and the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539
    ,
    11:40 GMTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn has grown from 2,076 members last month to 2,184 today and looks to be the most active of all the KM LinkedIn groups.

    Here are a few of the interesting discussions taking place:
    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join and the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539

    Monday 21 February 2011

    11:25 GMTPermanent link to #Fearing doing something# Fearing doing something - Comments (0)

    What is going on in the world, that when I propose a knowledge cafe instead of a talk, I am told it is not a good idea as people will not enroll if they feel they have to do something!

    Is our educational system so bad that people would rather sit silent through a talk & chalk, death-by-powertpoint presentation rather than listen to a short talk followed by some engaging conversation?

    Or is it that many of our organisations have created cultures where people are fearful of expressing their own opinion?

    Sunday 20 February 2011

    18:35 GMTPermanent link to #Hot knowledge tweets: February 2011# Hot knowledge tweets: February 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for Jan-Feb 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

    ,
    18:35 GMTPermanent link to #Hot knowledge tweets: February 2011# Hot knowledge tweets: February 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for Jan-Feb 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

    ,
    18:35 GMTPermanent link to #Hot knowledge tweets: February 2011# Hot knowledge tweets: February 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for Jan-Feb 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.


    Sunday 20 February 2011

    16:10 GMTPermanent link to #A good video collection of interviews with a number of KM people# A good video collection of interviews with a number of KM people - Comments (0)

    At the 2010 KM India Summit in Bangalore, Ankur Makhija of eClerx Services, recorded several mini-interviews with Verna Allee. he has uploaded them to their YouTube channel where you will find over 30 videos in total from people such as myself, Ron Young, Dave Snowden, Chris Collison, Madan Rao and Stefan Lafloer on such themes as:

    • Mapping Organizational Knowledge
    • Social Network Analysis for Knowledge Management
    • Creating a Knowledge Management Scorecard
    • Knowledge Management for Small and Medium Enterprises
    • Incentivizing Knowledge Sharing
    • Evolution of the KM Agenda
    • Converting Tacit Knowledge to Explicit

    While you are there check this out: an interview with Verna on Incentivizing Knowledge Sharing - so close to my view!





    We must stop "punishing people with rewards!"
    ,
    16:10 GMTPermanent link to #A good video collection of interviews with a number of KM people# A good video collection of interviews with a number of KM people - Comments (0)

    At the 2010 KM India Summit in Bangalore, Ankur Makhija of eClerx Services, recorded several mini-interviews with Verna Allee. he has uploaded them to their YouTube channel where you will find over 30 videos in total from people such as myself, Ron Young, Dave Snowden, Chris Collison, Madan Rao and Stefan Lafloer on such themes as:

    • Mapping Organizational Knowledge
    • Social Network Analysis for Knowledge Management
    • Creating a Knowledge Management Scorecard
    • Knowledge Management for Small and Medium Enterprises
    • Incentivizing Knowledge Sharing
    • Evolution of the KM Agenda
    • Converting Tacit Knowledge to Explicit

    While you are there check this out: an interview with Verna on Incentivizing Knowledge Sharing - so close to my view!





    We must stop "punishing people with rewards!"

    Sunday 20 February 2011

    10:32 GMTPermanent link to #What is good for business is not necessarily good for society!# What is good for business is not necessarily good for society! - Comments (0)

    Its good to see the likes of Michael Porter questioning capitalism in this Harvard Business Publishing interview on Rethinking Capitalism. In it he explains why business leaders must focus on shared value - creating products and services that benefit not only the company but also society.



    What is good for business is not necessarily good for society!
    ,
    10:32 GMTPermanent link to #What is good for business is not necessarily good for society!# What is good for business is not necessarily good for society! - Comments (0)

    Its good to see the likes of Michael Porter questioning capitalism in this Harvard Business Publishing interview on Rethinking Capitalism. In it he explains why business leaders must focus on shared value - creating products and services that benefit not only the company but also society.



    What is good for business is not necessarily good for society!

    Sunday 20 February 2011

    10:30 GMTPermanent link to #We need to accept that we might be wrong# We need to accept that we might be wrong - Comments (0)

    If you like TED Talks then I think you might like these RSA Vision videos. They are also available via an RSA iPhone app.

    There are not as many presentations as TED and most last longer than 20 minutes but its an excellent selection of talks that were videod at the RSA in London.

    The most recent talk I watched was from Kathryn Schulz on Being Wrong where she presents a tribute to human creativity and the way we generate and revise our beliefs about ourselves and the world.

    I am a fellow (just a fancy word for member) of the RSA and use the RSA in London as my "London office". It has a good though small library; wi-fi and a great little bar for meetings. There are also meeting rooms and seminar trooms you can hire; a members magazine and evening talks. All in all, excellent value.
    ,
    10:30 GMTPermanent link to #We need to accept that we might be wrong# We need to accept that we might be wrong - Comments (0)

    If you like TED Talks then I think you might like these RSA Vision videos. They are also available via an RSA iPhone app.

    There are not as many presentations as TED and most last longer than 20 minutes but its an excellent selection of talks that were videod at the RSA in London.

    The most recent talk I watched was from Kathryn Schulz on Being Wrong where she presents a tribute to human creativity and the way we generate and revise our beliefs about ourselves and the world.

    I am a fellow (just a fancy word for member) of the RSA and use the RSA in London as my "London office". It has a good though small library; wi-fi and a great little bar for meetings. There are also meeting rooms and seminar trooms you can hire; a members magazine and evening talks. All in all, excellent value.
    ,
    10:30 GMTPermanent link to #We need to accept that we might be wrong# We need to accept that we might be wrong - Comments (0)

    If you like TED Talks then I think you might like these RSA Vision videos. They are also available via an RSA iPhone app.

    There are not as many presentations as TED and most last longer than 20 minutes but its an excellent selection of talks that were videod at the RSA in London.

    The most recent talk I watched was from Kathryn Schulz on Being Wrong where she presents a tribute to human creativity and the way we generate and revise our beliefs about ourselves and the world.

    I am a fellow (just a fancy word for member) of the RSA and use the RSA in London as my "London office". It has a good though small library; wi-fi and a great little bar for meetings. There are also meeting rooms and seminar trooms you can hire; a members magazine and evening talks. All in all, excellent value.

    Saturday 19 February 2011

    09:54 GMTPermanent link to #How School Screws Things Up For "Real Life"# How School Screws Things Up For "Real Life" - Comments (0)

    I think there is a lot in this post from Michelle Martin on How School Screws Things Up For Real Life.

    I remember a girlfriend, some years ago, who did well in school and at University but was then floundered in the "real world".

    I recall her saying that when she was in the education system, she was happy, she had her goals and schedule set for her.

    She knew exactly what to do be successful - study hard and pass the exams. She did this well.

    But then on leaving University and entering the real world, there was no one to set goals for her and she do not know what to do or where to start. She was lost.

    "The mind is a fire to be kindled, not a vessel to be filled. ~Plutarch"

    Friday 11 February 2011

    18:18 GMTPermanent link to #A poignant moment for me as Hosni Mubarak resigns# A poignant moment for me as Hosni Mubarak resigns - Comments (0)

    I have just returned from Iran to hear the news from Egypt. My Iranian trip has made this historic event even more poignant for me as I met so many lovely people In Iran who are crying out for freedom themselves. And it was only last September that I was in Cairo for KM Egypt.

    Oh how I wish I could be there now but I have the next best thing, I have downloaded the Al Jazeera Live iPhone App and am watching the whole thing live as I work :-)

    An historic moment for the world and for me personally.

    Tuesday 8 February 2011

    02:58 GMTPermanent link to #My first day in Iran# My first day in Iran - Comments (0)

    Its my second morning here in Iran and the first day of the KM Iran conference. I was expecting a few little surprises yesterday. The good news - wi-fi in my room at USD$2 for 1 hour, charged by the minute. If only all hotels charged at that rate. Bad news: FaceBook, Twitter and LinkedIn blocked. I can understand the first two but LinkedIn seems pretty harmless to me. But the real bad news - my iPhone does not work - that I really cannot figure out. On the other hand, our hosts have lent us all a phone to communicate with. Better dash - taxi picking us up downstairs at 7:00am.

    Sunday 6 February 2011

    16:59 GMTPermanent link to #From information to conversation - We have to talk!# From information to conversation - We have to talk! - Comments (0)

    This is a lovely post on conversation by Esko Kilpi on why we need to talk. For those of you who have attended one of my knowledge cafe workshops- you will recognise the message - I say it in different words but the meaning is the same.

    People often need to act and make decisions in situations in which causality is poorly understood, where there is considerable uncertainty and people hold different beliefs and have personal biases. However, people very reluctantly acknowledge that they face ambiguity at work. Problems in organizations tend to get labelled as lack of information. It feels more professional to try to solve a knowledge management problem that is called lack of information than a problem that is called confusion.

    Because any information can mean a variety of things, meaning cannot simply be discovered. Information does not help. We have to talk! Many meetings that are directed at the problems of ambiguity fail to handle it because potentially rich views are silenced by autocratic leadership, norms that encourage harmony or reluctance to admit that one has no idea what is going on.



    How do we make sense of the world? Its through conversation. We have to talk!

    Thursday 20 January 2011

    15:05 GMTPermanent link to #The two meanings of Social Business and the future of Knowledge Management# The two meanings of Social Business and the future of Knowledge Management - Comments (0)

    Many of you may have noticed a new term kicking around the Enterprise 2.0 and Social Media space - that of Social Business. Its precise meaning is still the subject of debate - see the discussion on Quora: What are the distinctions between Social Business and Enterprise 2.0? One good definition, that I like, also from Quora is "The application of social principles - transparency, open information access, collaboration, participation, crowdsourcing, engagement - to the conduct of business."

    But the term Social Business has an alternative meaning that has been around a little longer than in the Enterprise 2.0 sense.

    A Social Business is a non-loss, non-dividend company designed to address a social objective. This use of the term has grown from the work of people like Muhammad Yunus and the Grameen Bank that he founded to provide micro-credit to the poor, would be a prime example of a Social Business. The measure of success of a social business is not profit but the impact that it has on society, on people and on the environment.

    To my mind, we need more social businesses to create a sustainable world. In order to survive: we need to collaborate more, to make better decisions and to be more innovative. This to me is what Knowledge Management is about and is its future. It’s Social Business in both senses of the term.
    ,
    15:05 GMTPermanent link to #The two meanings of Social Business and the future of Knowledge Management# The two meanings of Social Business and the future of Knowledge Management - Comments (0)

    Many of you may have noticed a new term kicking around the Enterprise 2.0 and Social Media space - that of Social Business. Its precise meaning is still the subject of debate - see the discussion on Quora: What are the distinctions between Social Business and Enterprise 2.0? One good definition, that I like, also from Quora is "The application of social principles - transparency, open information access, collaboration, participation, crowdsourcing, engagement - to the conduct of business."

    But the term Social Business has an alternative meaning that has been around a little longer than in the Enterprise 2.0 sense.

    A Social Business is a non-loss, non-dividend company designed to address a social objective. This use of the term has grown from the work of people like Muhammad Yunus and the Grameen Bank that he founded to provide micro-credit to the poor, would be a prime example of a Social Business. The measure of success of a social business is not profit but the impact that it has on society, on people and on the environment.

    To my mind, we need more social businesses to create a sustainable world. In order to survive: we need to collaborate more, to make better decisions and to be more innovative. This to me is what Knowledge Management is about and is its future. It’s Social Business in both senses of the term.
    ,
    15:05 GMTPermanent link to #The two meanings of Social Business and the future of Knowledge Management# The two meanings of Social Business and the future of Knowledge Management - Comments (0)

    Many of you may have noticed a new term kicking around the Enterprise 2.0 and Social Media space - that of Social Business. Its precise meaning is still the subject of debate - see the discussion on Quora: What are the distinctions between Social Business and Enterprise 2.0? One good definition, that I like, also from Quora is "The application of social principles - transparency, open information access, collaboration, participation, crowdsourcing, engagement - to the conduct of business."

    But the term Social Business has an alternative meaning that has been around a little longer than in the Enterprise 2.0 sense.

    A Social Business is a non-loss, non-dividend company designed to address a social objective. This use of the term has grown from the work of people like Muhammad Yunus and the Grameen Bank that he founded to provide micro-credit to the poor, would be a prime example of a Social Business. The measure of success of a social business is not profit but the impact that it has on society, on people and on the environment.

    To my mind, we need more social businesses to create a sustainable world. In order to survive: we need to collaborate more, to make better decisions and to be more innovative. This to me is what Knowledge Management is about and is its future. It’s Social Business in both senses of the term.
    ,
    15:05 GMTPermanent link to #The two meanings of Social Business and the future of Knowledge Management# The two meanings of Social Business and the future of Knowledge Management - Comments (0)

    Many of you may have noticed a new term kicking around the Enterprise 2.0 and Social Media space - that of Social Business. Its precise meaning is still the subject of debate - see the discussion on Quora: What are the distinctions between Social Business and Enterprise 2.0? One good definition, that I like, also from Quora is "The application of social principles - transparency, open information access, collaboration, participation, crowdsourcing, engagement - to the conduct of business."

    But the term Social Business has an alternative meaning that has been around a little longer than in the Enterprise 2.0 sense.

    A Social Business is a non-loss, non-dividend company designed to address a social objective. This use of the term has grown from the work of people like Muhammad Yunus and the Grameen Bank that he founded to provide micro-credit to the poor, would be a prime example of a Social Business. The measure of success of a social business is not profit but the impact that it has on society, on people and on the environment.

    To my mind, we need more social businesses to create a sustainable world. In order to survive: we need to collaborate more, to make better decisions and to be more innovative. This to me is what Knowledge Management is about and is its future. It’s Social Business in both senses of the term.

    Thursday 20 January 2011

    13:45 GMTPermanent link to #Facts don Facts don't necessarily have the power to change our minds. - Comments (0)

    So we consider ourselves to be objective - well if not that, at least capable of being objective. But its much harder then we think. I recently tweeted the Wikipedia page that lists our cognitive biases. I am amazed just how many of them there are - maybe a 100 or more. Its a very sobering list including decision-making and behavioural biases, biases in probability and belief, social biases and memory errors.

    And then recently I came across this article on How facts backfire.

    You would think that if someone had a view on a subject and you set out very clear, indisputable facts that they were wrong, that they would change their mind. Well research shows that many of us don't! In fact, we often became even more strongly set in our beliefs. 

    Here are a few quotes from the article:

    • Facts don't necessarily have the power to change our minds.

    • And rather than facts driving beliefs, our beliefs can dictate the facts we chose to accept. They can cause us to twist facts so they fit better with our preconceived notions. Worst of all, they can lead us to uncritically accept bad information just because it reinforces our beliefs. This reinforcement makes us more confident we’re right, and even less likely to listen to any new information. And then we vote.

    • But instead, it appears that misinformed people often have some of the strongest political opinions.

    • And if you harbor the notion — popular on both sides of the aisle — that the solution is more education and a higher level of political sophistication in voters overall, well, that’s a start, but not the solution.



    Its a rather scary article and demonstrates why change is so difficult. To me, this is part of what Knowledge Management is or should be all about. How do we recognise our cognitive biases when we make decisions and how do we avoid them, if that is at all possible, or at least mitigate them.
    ,
    13:45 GMTPermanent link to #Facts don Facts don't necessarily have the power to change our minds. - Comments (0)

    So we consider ourselves to be objective - well if not that, at least capable of being objective. But its much harder then we think. I recently tweeted the Wikipedia page that lists our cognitive biases. I am amazed just how many of them there are - maybe a 100 or more. Its a very sobering list including decision-making and behavioural biases, biases in probability and belief, social biases and memory errors.

    And then recently I came across this article on How facts backfire.

    You would think that if someone had a view on a subject and you set out very clear, indisputable facts that they were wrong, that they would change their mind. Well research shows that many of us don't! In fact, we often became even more strongly set in our beliefs. 

    Here are a few quotes from the article:

    • Facts don't necessarily have the power to change our minds.

    • And rather than facts driving beliefs, our beliefs can dictate the facts we chose to accept. They can cause us to twist facts so they fit better with our preconceived notions. Worst of all, they can lead us to uncritically accept bad information just because it reinforces our beliefs. This reinforcement makes us more confident we’re right, and even less likely to listen to any new information. And then we vote.

    • But instead, it appears that misinformed people often have some of the strongest political opinions.

    • And if you harbor the notion — popular on both sides of the aisle — that the solution is more education and a higher level of political sophistication in voters overall, well, that’s a start, but not the solution.



    Its a rather scary article and demonstrates why change is so difficult. To me, this is part of what Knowledge Management is or should be all about. How do we recognise our cognitive biases when we make decisions and how do we avoid them, if that is at all possible, or at least mitigate them.
    ,
    13:45 GMTPermanent link to #Facts don Facts don't necessarily have the power to change our minds. - Comments (0)

    So we consider ourselves to be objective - well if not that, at least capable of being objective. But its much harder then we think. I recently tweeted the Wikipedia page that lists our cognitive biases. I am amazed just how many of them there are - maybe a 100 or more. Its a very sobering list including decision-making and behavioural biases, biases in probability and belief, social biases and memory errors.

    And then recently I came across this article on How facts backfire.

    You would think that if someone had a view on a subject and you set out very clear, indisputable facts that they were wrong, that they would change their mind. Well research shows that many of us don't! In fact, we often became even more strongly set in our beliefs. 

    Here are a few quotes from the article:

    • Facts don't necessarily have the power to change our minds.

    • And rather than facts driving beliefs, our beliefs can dictate the facts we chose to accept. They can cause us to twist facts so they fit better with our preconceived notions. Worst of all, they can lead us to uncritically accept bad information just because it reinforces our beliefs. This reinforcement makes us more confident we’re right, and even less likely to listen to any new information. And then we vote.

    • But instead, it appears that misinformed people often have some of the strongest political opinions.

    • And if you harbor the notion — popular on both sides of the aisle — that the solution is more education and a higher level of political sophistication in voters overall, well, that’s a start, but not the solution.



    Its a rather scary article and demonstrates why change is so difficult. To me, this is part of what Knowledge Management is or should be all about. How do we recognise our cognitive biases when we make decisions and how do we avoid them, if that is at all possible, or at least mitigate them.

    Tuesday 18 January 2011

    12:47 GMTPermanent link to #The Law of Unintended Consequences# The Law of Unintended Consequences - Comments (0)

    It is far too easy both in business and in international development to be armchair philosophers. We so often think that the world's problems are simple and that we have the answers to them.

    But the evidence shows otherwise. We live in a world of clouds not one of clocks.

    There are always unintended consequences of our actions. Sometimes these are beneficial or a minor annoyance but often they are worse than the problem we are trying to solve.

    Konrad J. Friedemann defines the law of unintended consequences as “the proposition that every undertaking, however well-intentioned, is generally accompanied by unforeseen repercussions that can overshadow the principal endeavor.”



    The list goes on ... in complex world we must always stop and think and anticipate the unintended consequences of our actions. It always makes sense to talk and take advise and to conduct small pilot experiments, to probe and observe before committing to a major change.
    ,
    12:47 GMTPermanent link to #The Law of Unintended Consequences# The Law of Unintended Consequences - Comments (0)

    It is far too easy both in business and in international development to be armchair philosophers. We so often think that the world's problems are simple and that we have the answers to them.

    But the evidence shows otherwise. We live in a world of clouds not one of clocks.

    There are always unintended consequences of our actions. Sometimes these are beneficial or a minor annoyance but often they are worse than the problem we are trying to solve.

    Konrad J. Friedemann defines the law of unintended consequences as “the proposition that every undertaking, however well-intentioned, is generally accompanied by unforeseen repercussions that can overshadow the principal endeavor.”



    The list goes on ... in complex world we must always stop and think and anticipate the unintended consequences of our actions. It always makes sense to talk and take advise and to conduct small pilot experiments, to probe and observe before committing to a major change.
    ,
    12:47 GMTPermanent link to #The Law of Unintended Consequences# The Law of Unintended Consequences - Comments (0)

    It is far too easy both in business and in international development to be armchair philosophers. We so often think that the world's problems are simple and that we have the answers to them.

    But the evidence shows otherwise. We live in a world of clouds not one of clocks.

    There are always unintended consequences of our actions. Sometimes these are beneficial or a minor annoyance but often they are worse than the problem we are trying to solve.

    Konrad J. Friedemann defines the law of unintended consequences as “the proposition that every undertaking, however well-intentioned, is generally accompanied by unforeseen repercussions that can overshadow the principal endeavor.”



    The list goes on ... in complex world we must always stop and think and anticipate the unintended consequences of our actions. It always makes sense to talk and take advise and to conduct small pilot experiments, to probe and observe before committing to a major change.
    ,
    12:47 GMTPermanent link to #The Law of Unintended Consequences# The Law of Unintended Consequences - Comments (0)

    It is far too easy both in business and in international development to be armchair philosophers. We so often think that the world's problems are simple and that we have the answers to them.

    But the evidence shows otherwise. We live in a world of clouds not one of clocks.

    There are always unintended consequences of our actions. Sometimes these are beneficial or a minor annoyance but often they are worse than the problem we are trying to solve.

    Konrad J. Friedemann defines the law of unintended consequences as “the proposition that every undertaking, however well-intentioned, is generally accompanied by unforeseen repercussions that can overshadow the principal endeavor.”



    The list goes on ... in complex world we must always stop and think and anticipate the unintended consequences of our actions. It always makes sense to talk and take advise and to conduct small pilot experiments, to probe and observe before committing to a major change.
    ,
    12:47 GMTPermanent link to #The Law of Unintended Consequences# The Law of Unintended Consequences - Comments (0)

    It is far too easy both in business and in international development to be armchair philosophers. We so often think that the world's problems are simple and that we have the answers to them.

    But the evidence shows otherwise. We live in a world of clouds not one of clocks.

    There are always unintended consequences of our actions. Sometimes these are beneficial or a minor annoyance but often they are worse than the problem we are trying to solve.

    Konrad J. Friedemann defines the law of unintended consequences as “the proposition that every undertaking, however well-intentioned, is generally accompanied by unforeseen repercussions that can overshadow the principal endeavor.”



    The list goes on ... in complex world we must always stop and think and anticipate the unintended consequences of our actions. It always makes sense to talk and take advise and to conduct small pilot experiments, to probe and observe before committing to a major change.
    ,
    12:47 GMTPermanent link to #The Law of Unintended Consequences# The Law of Unintended Consequences - Comments (0)

    It is far too easy both in business and in international development to be armchair philosophers. We so often think that the world's problems are simple and that we have the answers to them.

    But the evidence shows otherwise. We live in a world of clouds not one of clocks.

    There are always unintended consequences of our actions. Sometimes these are beneficial or a minor annoyance but often they are worse than the problem we are trying to solve.

    Konrad J. Friedemann defines the law of unintended consequences as “the proposition that every undertaking, however well-intentioned, is generally accompanied by unforeseen repercussions that can overshadow the principal endeavor.”



    The list goes on ... in complex world we must always stop and think and anticipate the unintended consequences of our actions. It always makes sense to talk and take advise and to conduct small pilot experiments, to probe and observe before committing to a major change.

    Tuesday 18 January 2011

    12:00 GMTPermanent link to #KM Middle East Knowledge Management Survey# KM Middle East Knowledge Management Survey - Comments (0)

    I will be giving a keynote talk at KM Middle East in Abu Dhabi, 15 -16 March.

    Paul Corney of Sparknow has created a KM questionnaire to better understand the take up of KM in the Middle East. Here is his invite:

    Knowledge Management is beginning to attract attention in the Middle East. But how many organisations have set up a programme to make better use of their knowledge to gain a business edge. We invite you to help us find out.

    In advance of the 2011 event Sparknow has developed a short, simple and anonymous survey that we'd invite you to complete in the next few weeks. The results will be made available at KM Middle East blog and published on the Sparknow website afterwards.
    ,
    12:00 GMTPermanent link to #KM Middle East Knowledge Management Survey# KM Middle East Knowledge Management Survey - Comments (0)

    I will be giving a keynote talk at KM Middle East in Abu Dhabi, 15 -16 March.

    Paul Corney of Sparknow has created a KM questionnaire to better understand the take up of KM in the Middle East. Here is his invite:

    Knowledge Management is beginning to attract attention in the Middle East. But how many organisations have set up a programme to make better use of their knowledge to gain a business edge. We invite you to help us find out.

    In advance of the 2011 event Sparknow has developed a short, simple and anonymous survey that we'd invite you to complete in the next few weeks. The results will be made available at KM Middle East blog and published on the Sparknow website afterwards.
    ,
    12:00 GMTPermanent link to #KM Middle East Knowledge Management Survey# KM Middle East Knowledge Management Survey - Comments (0)

    I will be giving a keynote talk at KM Middle East in Abu Dhabi, 15 -16 March.

    Paul Corney of Sparknow has created a KM questionnaire to better understand the take up of KM in the Middle East. Here is his invite:

    Knowledge Management is beginning to attract attention in the Middle East. But how many organisations have set up a programme to make better use of their knowledge to gain a business edge. We invite you to help us find out.

    In advance of the 2011 event Sparknow has developed a short, simple and anonymous survey that we'd invite you to complete in the next few weeks. The results will be made available at KM Middle East blog and published on the Sparknow website afterwards.
    ,
    12:00 GMTPermanent link to #KM Middle East Knowledge Management Survey# KM Middle East Knowledge Management Survey - Comments (0)

    I will be giving a keynote talk at KM Middle East in Abu Dhabi, 15 -16 March.

    Paul Corney of Sparknow has created a KM questionnaire to better understand the take up of KM in the Middle East. Here is his invite:

    Knowledge Management is beginning to attract attention in the Middle East. But how many organisations have set up a programme to make better use of their knowledge to gain a business edge. We invite you to help us find out.

    In advance of the 2011 event Sparknow has developed a short, simple and anonymous survey that we'd invite you to complete in the next few weeks. The results will be made available at KM Middle East blog and published on the Sparknow website afterwards.

    Monday 17 January 2011

    17:27 GMTPermanent link to #Hot knowledge tweets: January 2011# Hot knowledge tweets: January 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for Dec-Jan 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

    ,
    17:27 GMTPermanent link to #Hot knowledge tweets: January 2011# Hot knowledge tweets: January 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for Dec-Jan 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

    ,
    17:27 GMTPermanent link to #Hot knowledge tweets: January 2011# Hot knowledge tweets: January 2011 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for Dec-Jan 2011. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.


    Monday 17 January 2011

    16:59 GMTPermanent link to #Henley KM Forum "Knowledge in Action" Leaflets# Henley KM Forum "Knowledge in Action" Leaflets - Comments (0)

    I have been a guest member of the Henley Knowledge Management Forum since its inception over ten years ago.

    They do some great collaborative research through their working groups, hold several 1-day seminars each year and a two-day conference which is coming up on 16-17 February that is open to non-KM Forum members.

    What has long disappointed me is that most of their papers are only available to forum members and are not freely available on the web which means I cannot blog or tweet them. But this is starting to change and they have made a number of Knowledge in Action Leaflets available. These leaflets are only a few pages long but summarise the findings of some of their more interesting collaborative research projects. Well worth taking a look.
    ,
    16:59 GMTPermanent link to #Henley KM Forum "Knowledge in Action" Leaflets# Henley KM Forum "Knowledge in Action" Leaflets - Comments (0)

    I have been a guest member of the Henley Knowledge Management Forum since its inception over ten years ago.

    They do some great collaborative research through their working groups, hold several 1-day seminars each year and a two-day conference which is coming up on 16-17 February that is open to non-KM Forum members.

    What has long disappointed me is that most of their papers are only available to forum members and are not freely available on the web which means I cannot blog or tweet them. But this is starting to change and they have made a number of Knowledge in Action Leaflets available. These leaflets are only a few pages long but summarise the findings of some of their more interesting collaborative research projects. Well worth taking a look.

    Monday 17 January 2011

    11:51 GMTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    Since I made the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn an open group last month membership has climbed from 1,989 to 2,076 members and activity is picking up.

    The major advantage of the group being open is that discussions are now indexed by search engines and anyone on the web can view the discussions. It is also now possible to Tweet interesting discussions which I have started to do.

    Here are a few interesting discussions:

    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join and you can join the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539
    ,
    11:51 GMTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    Since I made the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn an open group last month membership has climbed from 1,989 to 2,076 members and activity is picking up.

    The major advantage of the group being open is that discussions are now indexed by search engines and anyone on the web can view the discussions. It is also now possible to Tweet interesting discussions which I have started to do.

    Here are a few interesting discussions:

    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join and you can join the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539

    Friday 24 December 2010

    15:06 GMTPermanent link to #Introduction to the January 2011 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the January 2011 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    I wanted to give some money to charity over Christmas so I decided to make a few more Kiva loans. You can see my loan portfolio here. I have now made ten loans of which three have been fully paid back.

    What I like about Kiva is that I get to decide who my money goes to. And if I am lucky I get to see an update on how the money is spent. It's a great idea and makes giving so much more personal and rewarding. The loans and repaid to me without interest and I can then use the money to make further loans. The repayment rate is an amazing 98.94% and 81% of the loans are to women entrepreneurs. Here are the full stats.

    I am not telling you this to show how good I am - each loan is only $US25 after all. What I am hoping is that you might take a look and make some loans yourself and help support this way of giving.

    Kiva - loans that change lives


    Thursday 23 December 2010

    09:59 GMTPermanent link to #Clocks and clouds# Clocks and clouds - Comments (0)

    The mistake of not-only modern science but all our thinking is that we live in a universe of clouds not one of clocks.

    Thursday 23 December 2010

    09:08 GMTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin goes OPEN# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin goes OPEN - Comments (0)

    I have made the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn an open group.  The major advantage of this is that discussions are now indexed by search engines and anyone on the web can read the discussions. It is also now possible to Tweet interesting discussions.  To contribute to the group, however, you still need to be a member. 

    Discussions created before the switch have automatically gone into a members-only, read-only Archive and cannot be seen by anyone who is not a member of the group.  An unfortunate side affect of this is that discussions that were active before the switch, although still readable by members, are now frozen and not clearly visible.  If you wish to continue your open discussions I think you will need to repost them. I am sorry for the inconvenience but this was not clear before the switch. To my mind, LinkedIn have done an extremely poor design job here. 

    The bottom line though is that we should now have a far more useful place for group discussions that can be shared with the rest of the world. 

    The other good news is that over the past month, as a result of my mail-shot, the membership of the group has grown by almost 700 people to 1,989 members.

    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join

    You can join the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539
    ,
    09:08 GMTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin goes OPEN# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin goes OPEN - Comments (0)

    I have made the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn an open group.  The major advantage of this is that discussions are now indexed by search engines and anyone on the web can read the discussions. It is also now possible to Tweet interesting discussions.  To contribute to the group, however, you still need to be a member. 

    Discussions created before the switch have automatically gone into a members-only, read-only Archive and cannot be seen by anyone who is not a member of the group.  An unfortunate side affect of this is that discussions that were active before the switch, although still readable by members, are now frozen and not clearly visible.  If you wish to continue your open discussions I think you will need to repost them. I am sorry for the inconvenience but this was not clear before the switch. To my mind, LinkedIn have done an extremely poor design job here. 

    The bottom line though is that we should now have a far more useful place for group discussions that can be shared with the rest of the world. 

    The other good news is that over the past month, as a result of my mail-shot, the membership of the group has grown by almost 700 people to 1,989 members.

    You can join LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/reg/join

    You can join the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group here : http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1539

    Sunday 5 December 2010

    20:13 GMTPermanent link to #Introduction to the December 2010 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the December 2010 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    I hope you have better things to do than read my newsletter at this time of year so like past years I have kept it short. But if you would like a bit of fun and explore what the Nativity might have looked it in the modern world of social media then take a look at this short video The Digital Story of the Nativity.



    And let me wish you a very happy Christmas and a New Year full of fun and lots of knowledge sharing!

    Thursday 25 November 2010

    07:26 GMTPermanent link to #Improving understanding# Improving understanding - Comments (0)

    I received an email from a student a month or so back in which she asked for my advise.

    She told me that she was working on her KM thesis and thought she was doing well as she had received a merit on her literature review but was devastated when her supervisor told her 6 months later that she was doing worse than other undergraduate researchers as she had a very poor understanding of the main points.

    In my reply I suggested that she found a small group of her fellow students whom she could come together with once or twice a week over coffee and have conversations around the work (a mini knowledge cafe) and that she would soon get to see that other people had different points of view - not necessarily right or wrong but different and this would cause her to think more deeply about the topics and reflect on her own perspectives and that this should help lead to a deeper understanding.

    She replied very excitedly that she thought it was a brilliant idea and would try it. I have yet to hear back but I hope it works for her.

    Funny though, when I think back to my undergraduate days - I never ever had conversations with my fellow students about our work. I recall once a few us thought about getting together to form a study group and my tutor urging me not to waste my time.

    Now where did I read something recently that the critical success factor at Harvard was not innate intelligence (you need that to get there) or hard-work but the ability to network and to form study groups and learn informally and socially. I wish I could find the article.

    Wednesday 24 November 2010

    14:20 GMTPermanent link to #Self-Improvement Myths?# Self-Improvement Myths? - Comments (0)

    In reading this article on Self-Improvement Myths by Michael Schrage. It reminded me of a quotation I recently added to my collection.

    Do not believe in anything simply because you have heard it.

    Do not believe in anything simply because it is spoken and rumored by many.

    Do not believe in anything simply because it is found written in your religious books.

    Do not believe in anything merely on the authority of your teachers and elders.

    Do not believe in traditions because they have been handed down for many generations.

    But after observation and analysis, when you find that anything agrees with reason and is conducive to the good and benefit of one and all, then accept it and live up to it.



    Good advice, given its 2,500 years old! Almost everyday I seem to trip over recent and not so recent research that shows that much of what we take for granted and never question has little or no evidence to support it whatsoever.
    ,
    14:20 GMTPermanent link to #Self-Improvement Myths?# Self-Improvement Myths? - Comments (0)

    In reading this article on Self-Improvement Myths by Michael Schrage. It reminded me of a quotation I recently added to my collection.

    Do not believe in anything simply because you have heard it.

    Do not believe in anything simply because it is spoken and rumored by many.

    Do not believe in anything simply because it is found written in your religious books.

    Do not believe in anything merely on the authority of your teachers and elders.

    Do not believe in traditions because they have been handed down for many generations.

    But after observation and analysis, when you find that anything agrees with reason and is conducive to the good and benefit of one and all, then accept it and live up to it.



    Good advice, given its 2,500 years old! Almost everyday I seem to trip over recent and not so recent research that shows that much of what we take for granted and never question has little or no evidence to support it whatsoever.
    ,
    14:20 GMTPermanent link to #Self-Improvement Myths?# Self-Improvement Myths? - Comments (0)

    In reading this article on Self-Improvement Myths by Michael Schrage. It reminded me of a quotation I recently added to my collection.

    Do not believe in anything simply because you have heard it.

    Do not believe in anything simply because it is spoken and rumored by many.

    Do not believe in anything simply because it is found written in your religious books.

    Do not believe in anything merely on the authority of your teachers and elders.

    Do not believe in traditions because they have been handed down for many generations.

    But after observation and analysis, when you find that anything agrees with reason and is conducive to the good and benefit of one and all, then accept it and live up to it.



    Good advice, given its 2,500 years old! Almost everyday I seem to trip over recent and not so recent research that shows that much of what we take for granted and never question has little or no evidence to support it whatsoever.

    Wednesday 24 November 2010

    12:08 GMTPermanent link to #Hot tweets: November 2010# Hot tweets: November 2010 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for the month of November 2010. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • APQC 2011 Knowledge Management Conference Call for Presentations http://bit.ly/d7AheY #KM
      2010-11-22 15:59:31 UTC

    • RT @GurteenQuotes: "Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy." Anne Frank #quote http://bit.ly/7ROqfy
      2010-11-21 13:55:56 UTC

    • RT @JohnGirard: David Gurteen’s keynote at KM Middle East 2011: Don’t do KM!, Abu Dhabi, 15 March 2011, http://bit.ly/9Urw0P #KM #KMME
      2010-11-21 00:50:48 UTC

    • Key outcome from a knowledge cafe is what people take away in their heads http://bit.ly/9rnbpC /nice summary of my process
      2010-11-20 07:02:33 UTC

    • Video: Hole-In-The-Wall-Education http://linkd.in/bA0Teo #socialgood /love it
      2010-11-20 06:46:03 UTC

    • Listing of Bill Ives KM World 2010 session notes http://bit.ly/aLk0pu #km
      2010-11-19 15:28:14 UTC

    • RT @AlecJRoss: 20 years ago today, Tim Berners-Lee published his proposal for the World Wide Web. The proposal http://bit.ly/bDgwb9
      2010-11-19 11:54:44 UTC

    • RT @GurteenNews: Quotation: On what GNP means. by Robert F. Kenendy http://bit.ly/du3Tcl
      2010-11-19 06:51:41 UTC

    • RT @rotkapchen: "The only way you can understand a complex system is by engagement with it." @snowded #KMW10 #UX #ethnography
      2010-11-19 06:48:44 UTC

    • RT @complexified: RT @snowded: Slides and podcast from #kmw10 loaded http://bit.ly/a8E5zn #km
      2010-11-19 06:47:50 UTC

    • The Death -- and Reinvention -- of Management: A draft synthesis http://bit.ly/a3ceoO
      2010-11-18 07:45:47 UTC

    • Why You Should Focus on "Worst Practices" http://bit.ly/cPJA03 #km
      2010-11-17 17:16:28 UTC

    • Skype And Lessons Learnt http://bit.ly/bopBhz
      2010-11-17 12:08:34 UTC

    • 100 INSPIRING WAYS TO USE SOCIAL MEDIA IN THE CLASSROOM http://bit.ly/9WR55b
      2010-11-17 10:31:03 UTC

    • KM World 2010 notes: Stan Garfield on Communities of Practice http://bit.ly/arSLEG #km #kmw10
      2010-11-17 08:38:37 UTC

    • My KM World 2010 + Enterprise Search Summit 2010 Notes: Tom Stewart Key Note http://bit.ly/bbfpde #km #kmw10
      2010-11-16 18:33:40 UTC

    • RT @amcafee: 1 of Gartner's 4 trends that will change IT + biz over next 20 years = Business impact of social computing http://bit.ly/97BqNq
      2010-11-16 18:11:36 UTC

    • Video: Facebook’s New Messaging System Explained http://on.mash.to/9UvR9N
      2010-11-16 06:24:13 UTC

    • RT @GurteenQuotes: The most moral activity of all is the creation of space for life to move around. Robert M. Pirsig http://bit.ly/aqmR4
      2010-11-16 05:56:57 UTC

    • RT @GurteenNews: Share: Scott Berkun Covers the Many Myths of Innovation http://j.mp/cNJXdu
      2010-11-15 00:23:13 UTC

    • You can tell whether a man is wise by his questions http://bit.ly/bdQ1sO #km
      2010-11-15 00:20:56 UTC

    • Integrating learning into the business http://bit.ly/cdV2Ny #km
      2010-11-14 02:34:21 UTC

    • RT @AlexGoodall That is what learning is. You suddenly understand something you've understood all your life, but in a new way Dorris Lessing
      2010-11-14 02:29:49 UTC

    • Short video: Hidden assumptions http://bit.ly/92vYVV /brilliant!
      2010-11-14 02:15:15 UTC

    • Description of High and Low Context Cultures http://bit.ly/c0XjqW #KM
      2010-11-11 03:35:24 UTC

    • A marker can change the life (of your spouse) http://bit.ly/bQUORi /v. funny
      2010-11-11 03:33:30 UTC

    • Why Best Practices Are Hard to Practice http://bit.ly/cJVx0s #km
      2010-11-11 00:56:50 UTC

    • I have most common followers with @snowded (1318), @NancyWhite (809), @euan (764), @hjarche (718), @jclarey (714): http://tweeple.me
      2010-11-01 04:48:43 UTC

    • Dilbert on social media http://bit.ly/cTcOqh
      2010-10-30 21:35:08 UTC

    • Flipping lectures http://bit.ly/949Mml /brilliant idea
      2010-10-27 09:04:00 UTC


    ,
    12:08 GMTPermanent link to #Hot tweets: November 2010# Hot tweets: November 2010 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for the month of November 2010. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • APQC 2011 Knowledge Management Conference Call for Presentations http://bit.ly/d7AheY #KM
      2010-11-22 15:59:31 UTC

    • RT @GurteenQuotes: "Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy." Anne Frank #quote http://bit.ly/7ROqfy
      2010-11-21 13:55:56 UTC

    • RT @JohnGirard: David Gurteen’s keynote at KM Middle East 2011: Don’t do KM!, Abu Dhabi, 15 March 2011, http://bit.ly/9Urw0P #KM #KMME
      2010-11-21 00:50:48 UTC

    • Key outcome from a knowledge cafe is what people take away in their heads http://bit.ly/9rnbpC /nice summary of my process
      2010-11-20 07:02:33 UTC

    • Video: Hole-In-The-Wall-Education http://linkd.in/bA0Teo #socialgood /love it
      2010-11-20 06:46:03 UTC

    • Listing of Bill Ives KM World 2010 session notes http://bit.ly/aLk0pu #km
      2010-11-19 15:28:14 UTC

    • RT @AlecJRoss: 20 years ago today, Tim Berners-Lee published his proposal for the World Wide Web. The proposal http://bit.ly/bDgwb9
      2010-11-19 11:54:44 UTC

    • RT @GurteenNews: Quotation: On what GNP means. by Robert F. Kenendy http://bit.ly/du3Tcl
      2010-11-19 06:51:41 UTC

    • RT @rotkapchen: "The only way you can understand a complex system is by engagement with it." @snowded #KMW10 #UX #ethnography
      2010-11-19 06:48:44 UTC

    • RT @complexified: RT @snowded: Slides and podcast from #kmw10 loaded http://bit.ly/a8E5zn #km
      2010-11-19 06:47:50 UTC

    • The Death -- and Reinvention -- of Management: A draft synthesis http://bit.ly/a3ceoO
      2010-11-18 07:45:47 UTC

    • Why You Should Focus on "Worst Practices" http://bit.ly/cPJA03 #km
      2010-11-17 17:16:28 UTC

    • Skype And Lessons Learnt http://bit.ly/bopBhz
      2010-11-17 12:08:34 UTC

    • 100 INSPIRING WAYS TO USE SOCIAL MEDIA IN THE CLASSROOM http://bit.ly/9WR55b
      2010-11-17 10:31:03 UTC

    • KM World 2010 notes: Stan Garfield on Communities of Practice http://bit.ly/arSLEG #km #kmw10
      2010-11-17 08:38:37 UTC

    • My KM World 2010 + Enterprise Search Summit 2010 Notes: Tom Stewart Key Note http://bit.ly/bbfpde #km #kmw10
      2010-11-16 18:33:40 UTC

    • RT @amcafee: 1 of Gartner's 4 trends that will change IT + biz over next 20 years = Business impact of social computing http://bit.ly/97BqNq
      2010-11-16 18:11:36 UTC

    • Video: Facebook’s New Messaging System Explained http://on.mash.to/9UvR9N
      2010-11-16 06:24:13 UTC

    • RT @GurteenQuotes: The most moral activity of all is the creation of space for life to move around. Robert M. Pirsig http://bit.ly/aqmR4
      2010-11-16 05:56:57 UTC

    • RT @GurteenNews: Share: Scott Berkun Covers the Many Myths of Innovation http://j.mp/cNJXdu
      2010-11-15 00:23:13 UTC

    • You can tell whether a man is wise by his questions http://bit.ly/bdQ1sO #km
      2010-11-15 00:20:56 UTC

    • Integrating learning into the business http://bit.ly/cdV2Ny #km
      2010-11-14 02:34:21 UTC

    • RT @AlexGoodall That is what learning is. You suddenly understand something you've understood all your life, but in a new way Dorris Lessing
      2010-11-14 02:29:49 UTC

    • Short video: Hidden assumptions http://bit.ly/92vYVV /brilliant!
      2010-11-14 02:15:15 UTC

    • Description of High and Low Context Cultures http://bit.ly/c0XjqW #KM
      2010-11-11 03:35:24 UTC

    • A marker can change the life (of your spouse) http://bit.ly/bQUORi /v. funny
      2010-11-11 03:33:30 UTC

    • Why Best Practices Are Hard to Practice http://bit.ly/cJVx0s #km
      2010-11-11 00:56:50 UTC

    • I have most common followers with @snowded (1318), @NancyWhite (809), @euan (764), @hjarche (718), @jclarey (714): http://tweeple.me
      2010-11-01 04:48:43 UTC

    • Dilbert on social media http://bit.ly/cTcOqh
      2010-10-30 21:35:08 UTC

    • Flipping lectures http://bit.ly/949Mml /brilliant idea
      2010-10-27 09:04:00 UTC


    ,
    12:08 GMTPermanent link to #Hot tweets: November 2010# Hot tweets: November 2010 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for the month of November 2010. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • APQC 2011 Knowledge Management Conference Call for Presentations http://bit.ly/d7AheY #KM
      2010-11-22 15:59:31 UTC

    • RT @GurteenQuotes: "Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy." Anne Frank #quote http://bit.ly/7ROqfy
      2010-11-21 13:55:56 UTC

    • RT @JohnGirard: David Gurteen’s keynote at KM Middle East 2011: Don’t do KM!, Abu Dhabi, 15 March 2011, http://bit.ly/9Urw0P #KM #KMME
      2010-11-21 00:50:48 UTC

    • Key outcome from a knowledge cafe is what people take away in their heads http://bit.ly/9rnbpC /nice summary of my process
      2010-11-20 07:02:33 UTC

    • Video: Hole-In-The-Wall-Education http://linkd.in/bA0Teo #socialgood /love it
      2010-11-20 06:46:03 UTC

    • Listing of Bill Ives KM World 2010 session notes http://bit.ly/aLk0pu #km
      2010-11-19 15:28:14 UTC

    • RT @AlecJRoss: 20 years ago today, Tim Berners-Lee published his proposal for the World Wide Web. The proposal http://bit.ly/bDgwb9
      2010-11-19 11:54:44 UTC

    • RT @GurteenNews: Quotation: On what GNP means. by Robert F. Kenendy http://bit.ly/du3Tcl
      2010-11-19 06:51:41 UTC

    • RT @rotkapchen: "The only way you can understand a complex system is by engagement with it." @snowded #KMW10 #UX #ethnography
      2010-11-19 06:48:44 UTC

    • RT @complexified: RT @snowded: Slides and podcast from #kmw10 loaded http://bit.ly/a8E5zn #km
      2010-11-19 06:47:50 UTC

    • The Death -- and Reinvention -- of Management: A draft synthesis http://bit.ly/a3ceoO
      2010-11-18 07:45:47 UTC

    • Why You Should Focus on "Worst Practices" http://bit.ly/cPJA03 #km
      2010-11-17 17:16:28 UTC

    • Skype And Lessons Learnt http://bit.ly/bopBhz
      2010-11-17 12:08:34 UTC

    • 100 INSPIRING WAYS TO USE SOCIAL MEDIA IN THE CLASSROOM http://bit.ly/9WR55b
      2010-11-17 10:31:03 UTC

    • KM World 2010 notes: Stan Garfield on Communities of Practice http://bit.ly/arSLEG #km #kmw10
      2010-11-17 08:38:37 UTC

    • My KM World 2010 + Enterprise Search Summit 2010 Notes: Tom Stewart Key Note http://bit.ly/bbfpde #km #kmw10
      2010-11-16 18:33:40 UTC

    • RT @amcafee: 1 of Gartner's 4 trends that will change IT + biz over next 20 years = Business impact of social computing http://bit.ly/97BqNq
      2010-11-16 18:11:36 UTC

    • Video: Facebook’s New Messaging System Explained http://on.mash.to/9UvR9N
      2010-11-16 06:24:13 UTC

    • RT @GurteenQuotes: The most moral activity of all is the creation of space for life to move around. Robert M. Pirsig http://bit.ly/aqmR4
      2010-11-16 05:56:57 UTC

    • RT @GurteenNews: Share: Scott Berkun Covers the Many Myths of Innovation http://j.mp/cNJXdu
      2010-11-15 00:23:13 UTC

    • You can tell whether a man is wise by his questions http://bit.ly/bdQ1sO #km
      2010-11-15 00:20:56 UTC

    • Integrating learning into the business http://bit.ly/cdV2Ny #km
      2010-11-14 02:34:21 UTC

    • RT @AlexGoodall That is what learning is. You suddenly understand something you've understood all your life, but in a new way Dorris Lessing
      2010-11-14 02:29:49 UTC

    • Short video: Hidden assumptions http://bit.ly/92vYVV /brilliant!
      2010-11-14 02:15:15 UTC

    • Description of High and Low Context Cultures http://bit.ly/c0XjqW #KM
      2010-11-11 03:35:24 UTC

    • A marker can change the life (of your spouse) http://bit.ly/bQUORi /v. funny
      2010-11-11 03:33:30 UTC

    • Why Best Practices Are Hard to Practice http://bit.ly/cJVx0s #km
      2010-11-11 00:56:50 UTC

    • I have most common followers with @snowded (1318), @NancyWhite (809), @euan (764), @hjarche (718), @jclarey (714): http://tweeple.me
      2010-11-01 04:48:43 UTC

    • Dilbert on social media http://bit.ly/cTcOqh
      2010-10-30 21:35:08 UTC

    • Flipping lectures http://bit.ly/949Mml /brilliant idea
      2010-10-27 09:04:00 UTC



    Wednesday 24 November 2010

    08:47 GMTPermanent link to #Clay Shirky on Cognitive Surplus# Clay Shirky on Cognitive Surplus - Comments (0)

    My son Jonathan bought me Clay Shirky's book Cognitive Surplus for my birthday and I am looking forward to settling down to read it.

    Clay Shirky has been talking about the Cognitive Surplus for a couple of years now and I have blogged about it in the past and I had assumed that everyone was aware of the concept but during my recent travels I was surprised how many people had not heard of Clay nor Cognitive Surplus so here's the gist and video talk here.

    The central theme of the book Cognitive Surplus is that people are now learning how to more constructively use the free time afforded to them since the 1940s for creative acts rather than consumptive ones, particularly with the advent of online tools that allow new forms of collaboration. It goes on to catalog the means and motives behind these new forms of cultural production, as well as key examples.

    While Shirky acknowledges that the activities that we use our cognitive surplus for may be frivolous (such as creating LOLcats), the trend as a whole is leading to valuable and influential new forms of human expression. He also asserts that even the most inane forms of creation and sharing are preferable to the hundreds of billions of hours spent consuming television shows in countries such as the United States.


    Video: Clay Shirky: How cognitive surplus will change the world



    Clay Shirky: How cognitive surplus will change the world

    Media Information: Image


    ,
    08:47 GMTPermanent link to #Clay Shirky on Cognitive Surplus# Clay Shirky on Cognitive Surplus - Comments (0)

    My son Jonathan bought me Clay Shirky's book Cognitive Surplus for my birthday and I am looking forward to settling down to read it.

    Clay Shirky has been talking about the Cognitive Surplus for a couple of years now and I have blogged about it in the past and I had assumed that everyone was aware of the concept but during my recent travels I was surprised how many people had not heard of Clay nor Cognitive Surplus so here's the gist and video talk here.

    The central theme of the book Cognitive Surplus is that people are now learning how to more constructively use the free time afforded to them since the 1940s for creative acts rather than consumptive ones, particularly with the advent of online tools that allow new forms of collaboration. It goes on to catalog the means and motives behind these new forms of cultural production, as well as key examples.

    While Shirky acknowledges that the activities that we use our cognitive surplus for may be frivolous (such as creating LOLcats), the trend as a whole is leading to valuable and influential new forms of human expression. He also asserts that even the most inane forms of creation and sharing are preferable to the hundreds of billions of hours spent consuming television shows in countries such as the United States.


    Video: Clay Shirky: How cognitive surplus will change the world



    Clay Shirky: How cognitive surplus will change the world

    Media Information: Image



    Tuesday 23 November 2010

    22:52 GMTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Group on LinkedIn is now the central discussion forum for the Gurteen Knowledge Community.

    Over the past month, it has grown by over 100 people to 1,308 members. It's a great place to post questions and slowly more discussion and interaction are taking place on the forum.

    If you would like to join then you can register here.
    ,
    22:52 GMTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Group on LinkedIn is now the central discussion forum for the Gurteen Knowledge Community.

    Over the past month, it has grown by over 100 people to 1,308 members. It's a great place to post questions and slowly more discussion and interaction are taking place on the forum.

    If you would like to join then you can register here.

    Tuesday 23 November 2010

    22:29 GMTPermanent link to #Maggie Doyne and Kopila Valley Primary School# Maggie Doyne and Kopila Valley Primary School - Comments (0)

    Maggie Doyne is an amazing young woman. This is how her story starts (watch the video):

    After my senior year of high school, as my friends were heading off to college, my parents dropped me off at Newark Airport where I boarded a plane and set off to travel the world. It was just me and my backpack on my first solo trip away from home. Four countries and 20,000 miles later, I was trekking through the Himalayas in war-torn Nepal, where I began to meet hundreds of orphan children. I fell in love with their bright eyes and beautiful smiles, but was shocked to see them barely surviving without the most basic things that I had grown up with as a child.

    As I shared my dream to build a safe home for these children, with my hometown in Mendham, NJ, I was astounded by the outpouring of support. Three years ago, I officially opened the frontdoor of Kopila Valley Children's Home, built brick-by-brick, by me and the local community in Nepal. There are now 35 children living in our home.

    Credit: Maggie Doyne



    Why is it that some people accept things as they are and others like Maggie set out to change the world?
    ,
    22:29 GMTPermanent link to #Maggie Doyne and Kopila Valley Primary School# Maggie Doyne and Kopila Valley Primary School - Comments (0)

    Maggie Doyne is an amazing young woman. This is how her story starts (watch the video):

    After my senior year of high school, as my friends were heading off to college, my parents dropped me off at Newark Airport where I boarded a plane and set off to travel the world. It was just me and my backpack on my first solo trip away from home. Four countries and 20,000 miles later, I was trekking through the Himalayas in war-torn Nepal, where I began to meet hundreds of orphan children. I fell in love with their bright eyes and beautiful smiles, but was shocked to see them barely surviving without the most basic things that I had grown up with as a child.

    As I shared my dream to build a safe home for these children, with my hometown in Mendham, NJ, I was astounded by the outpouring of support. Three years ago, I officially opened the frontdoor of Kopila Valley Children's Home, built brick-by-brick, by me and the local community in Nepal. There are now 35 children living in our home.

    Credit: Maggie Doyne



    Why is it that some people accept things as they are and others like Maggie set out to change the world?
    ,
    22:29 GMTPermanent link to #Maggie Doyne and Kopila Valley Primary School# Maggie Doyne and Kopila Valley Primary School - Comments (0)

    Maggie Doyne is an amazing young woman. This is how her story starts (watch the video):

    After my senior year of high school, as my friends were heading off to college, my parents dropped me off at Newark Airport where I boarded a plane and set off to travel the world. It was just me and my backpack on my first solo trip away from home. Four countries and 20,000 miles later, I was trekking through the Himalayas in war-torn Nepal, where I began to meet hundreds of orphan children. I fell in love with their bright eyes and beautiful smiles, but was shocked to see them barely surviving without the most basic things that I had grown up with as a child.

    As I shared my dream to build a safe home for these children, with my hometown in Mendham, NJ, I was astounded by the outpouring of support. Three years ago, I officially opened the frontdoor of Kopila Valley Children's Home, built brick-by-brick, by me and the local community in Nepal. There are now 35 children living in our home.

    Credit: Maggie Doyne



    Why is it that some people accept things as they are and others like Maggie set out to change the world?

    Tuesday 23 November 2010

    10:35 GMTPermanent link to #Does "being professional" limit things?# Does "being professional" limit things? - Comments (0)

    I recently attended ECKM 2010 in Portugal and one of the participants, Kalle Tomingas, an amateur photographer, captured the social side of the conference so well in his photographs.

    In an email, later, to Daniela Castrataro I commented:

    "Yes I loved Portugal and Kalle's photos really captured the conference. I do like the ECKM conferences as they are so social. I think every conference should have a professional photographer to capture the spirit of the event - and its not that its an expensive thing to do :-)"

    To which she replied:

    "I think you're right about the photographer but I think that when we start adding the word "professional" to things, we somehow limit them. Talking about a photographer at a conference, he would certainly capture beautiful images and colours, actions, important moments, but the real essence will probably be missed out. If Kalle was called to take pictures at ECKM as The Professional Photographer, he would have seriously focussed on his job and probably missed the interaction and the 'social' of those days, and with that the true spirit of the event.

    It's exactly the same difference that we have between conferences and your Knowledge Cafes. Conferences put pressure on people to do their job in a serious, formal and "professional" way. This will never change. I'm not saying that nothing good comes out of conferences, but it's a very slow process and often an empty exercise, which keep the brains stuck on the same ideas and beliefs for too much time. In just one hour of knowledge cafe you can get as much content, interactivity, flexibility, new ideas, opinions..., as you will get in 10 year of ECKM (maybe)!"

    Daniela is of course right. I never do like that word "professional" and I am not too sure why I used it. I have written about my dislike for it in the past. Some how "being professional" seems unnatural and is the antithesis of "being human".

    Monday 22 November 2010

    11:54 GMTPermanent link to #KM Videos from Judi Sandrock# KM Videos from Judi Sandrock - Comments (0)

    Here are some short videos on various aspects of Knowledge Management by Judi Sandrock in South Africa from her DVD provided with her book The Art of Managing Knowledge.

    In this one on KM Team Development she makes a point that I make time and time again, where she asks "At all times we must ask ourselves - what is the value that we are contributing to the organization?" Enjoy :-)


    ,
    11:54 GMTPermanent link to #KM Videos from Judi Sandrock# KM Videos from Judi Sandrock - Comments (0)

    Here are some short videos on various aspects of Knowledge Management by Judi Sandrock in South Africa from her DVD provided with her book The Art of Managing Knowledge.

    In this one on KM Team Development she makes a point that I make time and time again, where she asks "At all times we must ask ourselves - what is the value that we are contributing to the organization?" Enjoy :-)



    Wednesday 27 April 2011

    12:11 GDTPermanent link to #In a good conversation you can reach out and touch each other# In a good conversation you can reach out and touch each other - Comments (0)

    I recently came across a post by Viv McWaters in which she advocates getting rid of tables in meetings or when facilitating group sessions. By and large I agree with all she says.

    But I ran a lot of Knowledge Cafes at the end of last year when travelling, and on one or two occasions, I had no tables, not out of choice, but simply because there were no tables in the room or there was not enough room for tables. Although I like the idea of "no tables" in a Knowledge Cafe, I have found in practice that I would rather have them

    The more I run Cafes the more I realise the importance of close physically proximity when having a conversation. My new rule is that if you can't reach out and touch the other people at the table then the table is too large or there are too many people. A 3 ft round table with four people is perfect.

    What I find in a Cafe with no tables is that groups tend to merge. So two groups of four tend to merge into one group of eight. People also move the chairs around. A small round table provides focus.

    I ran one Cafe in Singapore for SAFTI (the Singapore Armed Forces Training Institute) last year. Here we had no tables and all the chairs had wheels. What I loved about this was that when we came to change groups, the participants did not even stand up ... they just scooted the chairs around while remaining seated ... I wish I had captured it on video. Like many good things in Cafes, it just emerged.

    In a banked lecture theatre recently, (the worst place to hold a Cafe) people tended to naturally form groups of six to eight - often so broadly spread that people on the fringes were never quite part of the conversation. I vowed never, ever to run a Cafe in such a setting again!

    If I have a choice now between large tables and no tables at all then I tend to go for no tables.

    Think about it, in all good conversations, you are within touching distance of the other people and although I am not advocating that you do touch ... often you do ... it makes the whole conversation that much more natural and human.

    Monday 8 November 2010

    00:30 GMTPermanent link to #Introduction to the November 2010 Knowledge Letter# Introduction to the November 2010 Knowledge Letter - Comments (0)

    I am now back home after six weeks on the road (Singapore, Sydney, Canberra, Melbourne, Christchurch, Nelson, Wellington, Auckland, Sydney, Singapore and home - phew!). This is the third year I have made such a journey and I am still amazed that these trips go off without a hitch!

    I met a lot of great people - many whom were good friends or I had met on earlier trips and many who introduced me to clients, hosted me for the night, bought me dinner and more. But also a lot of new people who so enthusiastically engaged in my knowledge cafes and workshops. To all of you a BIG thank you.

    Saturday 23 October 2010

    07:17 GDTPermanent link to #Free Wifi please# Free Wifi please - Comments (0)

    While travelling I have been making much more use of Foursquare and Facebook Places. And something quite beautiful has dawned on me. If bars, restaurants, coffee houses, hotels and the like wish to be serous players in this game then it is going to be in their interest to provide free wifi :-)

    When I checked-in on Foursquare to my hotel in Melbourne, I found there was one existing comment and so I added my own to complement it :-)

    Slowly hotels are starting to get the message. Singapore understands - pretty much all the places I visit have free wifi including my regular hotel.

    Saturday 23 October 2010

    05:48 GDTPermanent link to #The soft stuff is the hard stuff# The soft stuff is the hard stuff - Comments (0)

    In the words of Euan Semple from a recent blog post "Listening to endless presentations about business and technology as I do it becomes more and more obvious that the opportunity to capitalise on increased connectivity, and the need to reinvent our institutions, are entirely dependent on the quality of our relationships. Shame people are still squeamish about talking about this."

    Funny reading this, as only hours earlier in a Knowledge Cafe here in Melbourne, someone reminded me that the most important benefit of conversation was improved relationships. Why is it that some many people see conversation as a waste of time? I will never know.

    Increasingly, I think that is there is any hope left for this world the answer lies in conversation.

    I am still pondering whether to give up all the other stuff I do and just focus on my Knowledge Cafes and bringing people together to have "interesting conversations" :-)

    Saturday 23 October 2010

    05:36 GDTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Group on LinkedIn is the central discussion forum for the Gurteen Knowledge Community.

    There are now just over 1,200 members. If you would like to join then you can register here.

    Please take the time to register and join the conversations and help turn what is still really just a network into a community :-)
    ,
    05:36 GDTPermanent link to #Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    The Gurteen Knowledge Group on LinkedIn is the central discussion forum for the Gurteen Knowledge Community.

    There are now just over 1,200 members. If you would like to join then you can register here.

    Please take the time to register and join the conversations and help turn what is still really just a network into a community :-)

    Saturday 23 October 2010

    05:20 GDTPermanent link to #What KM practitioners can learn from Positive Deviance# What KM practitioners can learn from Positive Deviance - Comments (0)

    I gave the keynote speech at the actKM conference in Canberra last week. Its one of my favorite conference and this was the third time I had participated so I felt right at home with a great a bunch of people. The dinner on the first night will long be remembered for the KM fables that we wrote and acted out and the KM song!

    In my talk, I took the opportunity to share some of my thoughts on the underlying principals that has made Positive Deviance a success and the lessons that KM practitioners can learn from this approach to complex social problems.

    You can find my slides on SlideShare.
    ,
    05:20 GDTPermanent link to #What KM practitioners can learn from Positive Deviance# What KM practitioners can learn from Positive Deviance - Comments (0)

    I gave the keynote speech at the actKM conference in Canberra last week. Its one of my favorite conference and this was the third time I had participated so I felt right at home with a great a bunch of people. The dinner on the first night will long be remembered for the KM fables that we wrote and acted out and the KM song!

    In my talk, I took the opportunity to share some of my thoughts on the underlying principals that has made Positive Deviance a success and the lessons that KM practitioners can learn from this approach to complex social problems.

    You can find my slides on SlideShare.

    Saturday 23 October 2010

    05:10 GDTPermanent link to #Share it, don Share it, don't just store it - Comments (0)

    This is an interesting post from Jack Vinson based on a post from Cory Banks.

    As Cory concludes in his post "If you want to make sure you successfully communicate your message, get your point across or transfer some knowledge then you need to do a lot more than draft a document and upload it."

    As someone else once said, databases are where documents go to die!
    ,
    05:10 GDTPermanent link to #Share it, don Share it, don't just store it - Comments (0)

    This is an interesting post from Jack Vinson based on a post from Cory Banks.

    As Cory concludes in his post "If you want to make sure you successfully communicate your message, get your point across or transfer some knowledge then you need to do a lot more than draft a document and upload it."

    As someone else once said, databases are where documents go to die!

    Saturday 23 October 2010

    04:03 GDTPermanent link to #A Knowledge Cafe in the Sky?# A Knowledge Cafe in the Sky? - Comments (0)

    Imagine a hotel consisting of three tall 55-storey tower blocks with a ship perched on top. I am serious. Well, something that looks like a ship LOL - an incredible roof top garden called a SkyPark. They have built one in Singapore - the Sands SkyPark.

    I don't know how I am going to do it but I want to run a Knowledge Cafe up there :-) Has anyone got any ideas on how to make that happen?
    ,
    04:03 GDTPermanent link to #A Knowledge Cafe in the Sky?# A Knowledge Cafe in the Sky? - Comments (0)

    Imagine a hotel consisting of three tall 55-storey tower blocks with a ship perched on top. I am serious. Well, something that looks like a ship LOL - an incredible roof top garden called a SkyPark. They have built one in Singapore - the Sands SkyPark.

    I don't know how I am going to do it but I want to run a Knowledge Cafe up there :-) Has anyone got any ideas on how to make that happen?

    Saturday 23 October 2010

    03:21 GDTPermanent link to #Hot tweets: October 2010# Hot tweets: October 2010 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for the month of October 2010. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Doctors And Nurses Prove Clinical Sucess. http://news.sky.com/skynews/Article/201010115758767

      2010-10-16 04:45:36 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @leahdarby: come hear @snowded' s keynote/attend site visit at KM Legal Europe 26-27 Jan'11 Amsterdam http://goo.gl/FKY5 #KMLE11

      2010-10-14 10:42:18 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Wipro Technologies Wins Asian MAKE Award 2010 http://bit.ly/cJG316 #km

      2010-10-14 10:06:45 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @snowded: Large NHS conference today, of 150 senior managers only one uses twitter!

      2010-10-12 22:01:52 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @GurteenQuotes: "Argument is meant to reveal the truth, not to create it." Edward De Bono #quote http://bit.ly/5YNBTD

      2010-10-11 22:03:40 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Conference ruts http://bit.ly/cIncGC

      2010-10-06 12:20:53 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Johnnie Moore: Action, feelings and meaning http://bit.ly/dpv3kG

      2010-10-06 11:08:40 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      James Robertson on User Adoption Strategies, "a must-read" http://bit.ly/clN8Pa

      2010-10-05 09:21:57 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Video: The Source of Creativity by John Cleese http://bit.ly/bCUh13

      2010-10-05 07:26:37 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Dilbert: What do you get when you combine cognitive bias with inaccurate information? http://bit.ly/d59c96 #KM

      2010-10-05 07:17:29 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @GurteenNews: Share: Speed Consulting http://j.mp/cRDUGu #KM

      2010-10-05 07:06:22 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Call for papers ECKM 2011 1-2 Sept, Passau, Germany http://bit.ly/aQgJjR #KM

      2010-10-04 11:42:05 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @snowded: On line interview with myself and Mary Boone re HBR article on #Cynefin http://bit.ly/alMqaY

      2010-10-04 07:00:03 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      “don’t be the best in the world at what you do; be the only one in the world who does what you do.” http://bit.ly/9K33bL

      2010-10-03 15:33:38 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Donald Duck & the Truth of our times - The Cavalry is Coming http://bit.ly/d0p2QC

      2010-10-03 15:30:13 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Saudi women fight for control of their marital fate http://bit.ly/9clB5h

      2010-10-03 14:29:04 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Students in Singapore have ranked at or near top on int'l math exams since the mid-1990s http://nyti.ms/cEaRPz

      2010-10-03 08:03:15 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @JohnGirard: KM Middle East 2011 Abu Dhabi March 15/16. @DavidGurteen & @JohnGirard to deliver keynotes #KMME #KM

      2010-10-03 07:53:23 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Conflict sells papers and pulls in eyeballs and ears. http://bit.ly/ckHLZZ

      2010-10-02 07:38:54 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Raj Patel on the Value of Nothing http://bit.ly/atTbGK

      2010-10-01 08:49:11 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Why we need a new media model - Complexity! http://bit.ly/ckHLZZ

      2010-10-01 07:03:41 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Want to Help Developing Countries? Sell Them Good Stuff - Cheap http://bit.ly/cEfMni #socialgood

      2010-09-28 11:28:43 UTC


    ,
    03:21 GDTPermanent link to #Hot tweets: October 2010# Hot tweets: October 2010 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for the month of October 2010. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Doctors And Nurses Prove Clinical Sucess. http://news.sky.com/skynews/Article/201010115758767

      2010-10-16 04:45:36 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @leahdarby: come hear @snowded' s keynote/attend site visit at KM Legal Europe 26-27 Jan'11 Amsterdam http://goo.gl/FKY5 #KMLE11

      2010-10-14 10:42:18 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Wipro Technologies Wins Asian MAKE Award 2010 http://bit.ly/cJG316 #km

      2010-10-14 10:06:45 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @snowded: Large NHS conference today, of 150 senior managers only one uses twitter!

      2010-10-12 22:01:52 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @GurteenQuotes: "Argument is meant to reveal the truth, not to create it." Edward De Bono #quote http://bit.ly/5YNBTD

      2010-10-11 22:03:40 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Conference ruts http://bit.ly/cIncGC

      2010-10-06 12:20:53 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Johnnie Moore: Action, feelings and meaning http://bit.ly/dpv3kG

      2010-10-06 11:08:40 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      James Robertson on User Adoption Strategies, "a must-read" http://bit.ly/clN8Pa

      2010-10-05 09:21:57 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Video: The Source of Creativity by John Cleese http://bit.ly/bCUh13

      2010-10-05 07:26:37 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Dilbert: What do you get when you combine cognitive bias with inaccurate information? http://bit.ly/d59c96 #KM

      2010-10-05 07:17:29 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @GurteenNews: Share: Speed Consulting http://j.mp/cRDUGu #KM

      2010-10-05 07:06:22 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Call for papers ECKM 2011 1-2 Sept, Passau, Germany http://bit.ly/aQgJjR #KM

      2010-10-04 11:42:05 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @snowded: On line interview with myself and Mary Boone re HBR article on #Cynefin http://bit.ly/alMqaY

      2010-10-04 07:00:03 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      “don’t be the best in the world at what you do; be the only one in the world who does what you do.” http://bit.ly/9K33bL

      2010-10-03 15:33:38 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Donald Duck & the Truth of our times - The Cavalry is Coming http://bit.ly/d0p2QC

      2010-10-03 15:30:13 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Saudi women fight for control of their marital fate http://bit.ly/9clB5h

      2010-10-03 14:29:04 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Students in Singapore have ranked at or near top on int'l math exams since the mid-1990s http://nyti.ms/cEaRPz

      2010-10-03 08:03:15 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @JohnGirard: KM Middle East 2011 Abu Dhabi March 15/16. @DavidGurteen & @JohnGirard to deliver keynotes #KMME #KM

      2010-10-03 07:53:23 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Conflict sells papers and pulls in eyeballs and ears. http://bit.ly/ckHLZZ

      2010-10-02 07:38:54 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Raj Patel on the Value of Nothing http://bit.ly/atTbGK

      2010-10-01 08:49:11 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Why we need a new media model - Complexity! http://bit.ly/ckHLZZ

      2010-10-01 07:03:41 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Want to Help Developing Countries? Sell Them Good Stuff - Cheap http://bit.ly/cEfMni #socialgood

      2010-09-28 11:28:43 UTC


    ,
    03:21 GDTPermanent link to #Hot tweets: October 2010# Hot tweets: October 2010 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for the month of October 2010. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.
    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Doctors And Nurses Prove Clinical Sucess. http://news.sky.com/skynews/Article/201010115758767

      2010-10-16 04:45:36 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @leahdarby: come hear @snowded' s keynote/attend site visit at KM Legal Europe 26-27 Jan'11 Amsterdam http://goo.gl/FKY5 #KMLE11

      2010-10-14 10:42:18 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Wipro Technologies Wins Asian MAKE Award 2010 http://bit.ly/cJG316 #km

      2010-10-14 10:06:45 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @snowded: Large NHS conference today, of 150 senior managers only one uses twitter!

      2010-10-12 22:01:52 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @GurteenQuotes: "Argument is meant to reveal the truth, not to create it." Edward De Bono #quote http://bit.ly/5YNBTD

      2010-10-11 22:03:40 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Conference ruts http://bit.ly/cIncGC

      2010-10-06 12:20:53 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Johnnie Moore: Action, feelings and meaning http://bit.ly/dpv3kG

      2010-10-06 11:08:40 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      James Robertson on User Adoption Strategies, "a must-read" http://bit.ly/clN8Pa

      2010-10-05 09:21:57 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Video: The Source of Creativity by John Cleese http://bit.ly/bCUh13

      2010-10-05 07:26:37 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Dilbert: What do you get when you combine cognitive bias with inaccurate information? http://bit.ly/d59c96 #KM

      2010-10-05 07:17:29 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @GurteenNews: Share: Speed Consulting http://j.mp/cRDUGu #KM

      2010-10-05 07:06:22 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Call for papers ECKM 2011 1-2 Sept, Passau, Germany http://bit.ly/aQgJjR #KM

      2010-10-04 11:42:05 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @snowded: On line interview with myself and Mary Boone re HBR article on #Cynefin http://bit.ly/alMqaY

      2010-10-04 07:00:03 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      “don’t be the best in the world at what you do; be the only one in the world who does what you do.” http://bit.ly/9K33bL

      2010-10-03 15:33:38 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Donald Duck & the Truth of our times - The Cavalry is Coming http://bit.ly/d0p2QC

      2010-10-03 15:30:13 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Saudi women fight for control of their marital fate http://bit.ly/9clB5h

      2010-10-03 14:29:04 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Students in Singapore have ranked at or near top on int'l math exams since the mid-1990s http://nyti.ms/cEaRPz

      2010-10-03 08:03:15 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      RT @JohnGirard: KM Middle East 2011 Abu Dhabi March 15/16. @DavidGurteen & @JohnGirard to deliver keynotes #KMME #KM

      2010-10-03 07:53:23 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Conflict sells papers and pulls in eyeballs and ears. http://bit.ly/ckHLZZ

      2010-10-02 07:38:54 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Raj Patel on the Value of Nothing http://bit.ly/atTbGK

      2010-10-01 08:49:11 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Why we need a new media model - Complexity! http://bit.ly/ckHLZZ

      2010-10-01 07:03:41 UTC

    • David Gurteen (DavidGurteen)

      Want to Help Developing Countries? Sell Them Good Stuff - Cheap http://bit.ly/cEfMni #socialgood

      2010-09-28 11:28:43 UTC



    Monday 27 September 2010

    17:36 GDTPermanent link to #Questioning brainstorming# Questioning brainstorming - Comments (0)

    When I was in corporate life, many things were inflicted on me that I either hated or felt very uncomfortable with. Brainstorming was one of them. I can't recall one where I felt anything useful resulted from them other than a pile of flip-chart paper.

    It just never jelled with the way my mind works. I always felt the process far to controlling. I wanted to have conversations but that wasn't allowed. So I would accept and go along with brainstorming as no one else seemed to question it.

    So I am so pleased to see in this Newsweek article (via an interesting post by Johnnie Moore) that people are questioning the method.

    And take a look here Brainstorming wont bring you good ideas.

    This to me, sums it up: "Ideas come out of relationships, they come out of conversations." and "good ideas are more likely to be the product of rambling conversations than brainstorming." Oh and yet another post from Johnnie Moore: Where (and when) ideas happen - "people simplify their ideas as solitary, Eureka moments, whereas ideas often happen in social environments."

    There are some other good points made in the article too. "That people are attracted to the idea that complex things can be explained by a simple formula, or achieved by a step-by-step process. In this way, personalities are reduced to a number of types (such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) and pathways to success are promoted with the packaging of a number of rules."

    How many times have I been asked for ten simple steps to implement KM? The world is too complex for that! And those of you who have seen Dave Snowden speak know his views on Myers-Briggs.

    There is a lot of fundamental things that we have long taken for granted that need questioning.
    ,
    17:36 GDTPermanent link to #Questioning brainstorming# Questioning brainstorming - Comments (0)

    When I was in corporate life, many things were inflicted on me that I either hated or felt very uncomfortable with. Brainstorming was one of them. I can't recall one where I felt anything useful resulted from them other than a pile of flip-chart paper.

    It just never jelled with the way my mind works. I always felt the process far to controlling. I wanted to have conversations but that wasn't allowed. So I would accept and go along with brainstorming as no one else seemed to question it.

    So I am so pleased to see in this Newsweek article (via an interesting post by Johnnie Moore) that people are questioning the method.

    And take a look here Brainstorming wont bring you good ideas.

    This to me, sums it up: "Ideas come out of relationships, they come out of conversations." and "good ideas are more likely to be the product of rambling conversations than brainstorming." Oh and yet another post from Johnnie Moore: Where (and when) ideas happen - "people simplify their ideas as solitary, Eureka moments, whereas ideas often happen in social environments."

    There are some other good points made in the article too. "That people are attracted to the idea that complex things can be explained by a simple formula, or achieved by a step-by-step process. In this way, personalities are reduced to a number of types (such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) and pathways to success are promoted with the packaging of a number of rules."

    How many times have I been asked for ten simple steps to implement KM? The world is too complex for that! And those of you who have seen Dave Snowden speak know his views on Myers-Briggs.

    There is a lot of fundamental things that we have long taken for granted that need questioning.
    ,
    17:36 GDTPermanent link to #Questioning brainstorming# Questioning brainstorming - Comments (0)

    When I was in corporate life, many things were inflicted on me that I either hated or felt very uncomfortable with. Brainstorming was one of them. I can't recall one where I felt anything useful resulted from them other than a pile of flip-chart paper.

    It just never jelled with the way my mind works. I always felt the process far to controlling. I wanted to have conversations but that wasn't allowed. So I would accept and go along with brainstorming as no one else seemed to question it.

    So I am so pleased to see in this Newsweek article (via an interesting post by Johnnie Moore) that people are questioning the method.

    And take a look here Brainstorming wont bring you good ideas.

    This to me, sums it up: "Ideas come out of relationships, they come out of conversations." and "good ideas are more likely to be the product of rambling conversations than brainstorming." Oh and yet another post from Johnnie Moore: Where (and when) ideas happen - "people simplify their ideas as solitary, Eureka moments, whereas ideas often happen in social environments."

    There are some other good points made in the article too. "That people are attracted to the idea that complex things can be explained by a simple formula, or achieved by a step-by-step process. In this way, personalities are reduced to a number of types (such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) and pathways to success are promoted with the packaging of a number of rules."

    How many times have I been asked for ten simple steps to implement KM? The world is too complex for that! And those of you who have seen Dave Snowden speak know his views on Myers-Briggs.

    There is a lot of fundamental things that we have long taken for granted that need questioning.
    ,
    17:36 GDTPermanent link to #Questioning brainstorming# Questioning brainstorming - Comments (0)

    When I was in corporate life, many things were inflicted on me that I either hated or felt very uncomfortable with. Brainstorming was one of them. I can't recall one where I felt anything useful resulted from them other than a pile of flip-chart paper.

    It just never jelled with the way my mind works. I always felt the process far to controlling. I wanted to have conversations but that wasn't allowed. So I would accept and go along with brainstorming as no one else seemed to question it.

    So I am so pleased to see in this Newsweek article (via an interesting post by Johnnie Moore) that people are questioning the method.

    And take a look here Brainstorming wont bring you good ideas.

    This to me, sums it up: "Ideas come out of relationships, they come out of conversations." and "good ideas are more likely to be the product of rambling conversations than brainstorming." Oh and yet another post from Johnnie Moore: Where (and when) ideas happen - "people simplify their ideas as solitary, Eureka moments, whereas ideas often happen in social environments."

    There are some other good points made in the article too. "That people are attracted to the idea that complex things can be explained by a simple formula, or achieved by a step-by-step process. In this way, personalities are reduced to a number of types (such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) and pathways to success are promoted with the packaging of a number of rules."

    How many times have I been asked for ten simple steps to implement KM? The world is too complex for that! And those of you who have seen Dave Snowden speak know his views on Myers-Briggs.

    There is a lot of fundamental things that we have long taken for granted that need questioning.

    Monday 27 September 2010

    16:49 GDTPermanent link to #Counterintuition# Counterintuition - Comments (0)

    Johnnie Moore recently blogged on The Danger of Safety and pointed to some evidence that although you would expect that better brakes made for safe driving that is exactly the opposite of what happened in an experiment with a fleet of taxis.

    So better brakes - can lead to more accidents!

    This reminded me of some other articles I had read. So improved road signs may lead to more accidents and posting calories counts on food may lead to people eating more food rather than less.

    The lesson? Many things we do, we do for what seem like good intuitive reasons. We don't question things enough. Where we can, we need to back decisions up with evidence not intuition.

    See what Wikipedia says on Counterintuition.
    ,
    16:49 GDTPermanent link to #Counterintuition# Counterintuition - Comments (0)

    Johnnie Moore recently blogged on The Danger of Safety and pointed to some evidence that although you would expect that better brakes made for safe driving that is exactly the opposite of what happened in an experiment with a fleet of taxis.

    So better brakes - can lead to more accidents!

    This reminded me of some other articles I had read. So improved road signs may lead to more accidents and posting calories counts on food may lead to people eating more food rather than less.

    The lesson? Many things we do, we do for what seem like good intuitive reasons. We don't question things enough. Where we can, we need to back decisions up with evidence not intuition.

    See what Wikipedia says on Counterintuition.
    ,
    16:49 GDTPermanent link to #Counterintuition# Counterintuition - Comments (0)

    Johnnie Moore recently blogged on The Danger of Safety and pointed to some evidence that although you would expect that better brakes made for safe driving that is exactly the opposite of what happened in an experiment with a fleet of taxis.

    So better brakes - can lead to more accidents!

    This reminded me of some other articles I had read. So improved road signs may lead to more accidents and posting calories counts on food may lead to people eating more food rather than less.

    The lesson? Many things we do, we do for what seem like good intuitive reasons. We don't question things enough. Where we can, we need to back decisions up with evidence not intuition.

    See what Wikipedia says on Counterintuition.

    Monday 27 September 2010

    14:42 GDTPermanent link to #E2.0 folks learning what KM folks learnt long ago# E2.0 folks learning what KM folks learnt long ago - Comments (0)

    Here is an interesting post from Gautam Ghosh entitled Driving Enterprise 2.0 behavior change where he points to an article Not every blog has its day in the Sydney Morning Herald. The article makes the point that "Fostering collaboration in the workplace involves more than just building platforms".

    I had to smile as its really about E2.0 folks learning what KM folks have long known.

    I learnt this myself with Lotus Notes 1989 - 1999 (in fact it was one of the prime motivators for my moving away from technology and starting to focus more on the people side of things); KM folks then learnt it 1999 -2009 and now the E2.0 folks are learning it.

    To my mind, the lesson: "Don't implement a technology tool (impose it on people) and expect them to see the benefits and use it. Work with them to help them solve their problems and introduce them to new tools that you think will help. Let them select the tools that work for them. They need to have ownership."

    But it takes time ... 20 years or more and people are still learning :-)

    Monday 27 September 2010

    13:54 GDTPermanent link to #Follow my Twitter Feeds# Follow my Twitter Feeds - Comments (0)

    I have three Twitter feeds. Follow:
    • DavidGurteen if you wish to track my personal feed that I use to point to interesting stuff, keep people updated on where I am, what I am doing, thinking etc.

    • GurteenQuotes if you would like to receive a quotation each day.

    • GurteenNews if you would like to track new and updated pages on my website.
    The last two feeds, Gurteen Quotes and GurteenNews and automated Tweets fed by RSS feeds from my website. Up until recently, these have only been working intermittently but I think I have the problem cracked now by switching from twitterfeed to dlvr.it

    Monday 27 September 2010

    12:30 GDTPermanent link to #Facebook Profiles, Pages and Groups explained# Facebook Profiles, Pages and Groups explained - Comments (0)

    I don't know about you but I have always been confused by the different types of Facebook entities: Profiles, Pages and Groups. Here is a brief description of each entity and how I am using them.
    • A Facebook Profile is meant for individuals. This is what most people use. You can see my profile here:

      David Gurteen's Facebook Profile

    • To build a fan base on Facebook, in addition to a Profile, you can set up a Page. Pages can be for individuals, such as authors or celebrities, or for non-human entities such as products, companies, organizations and campaigns. I have created a Page for the Gurteen Knowledge website though I am not making much use of it at the moment:

      Gurteen Knowledge Fan Page on Facebook

    • A Facebook Group used to be the only place to really build a community on Facebook. However, now Groups look similar to Pages, which look similar to Profiles. Groups on Facebook are where deeper discussions can take place, whereas Pages and Profiles tend to be used for shorter comments.

      I have created a Group for the Gurteen Knowledge Community. This has a little activity and I would encourage you to use it more. But the prime on-line location for the community is the Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on LinkedIn.

      Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Facebook
    Take a look here if you want to read in more death about Facebook Profiles, Pages and Groups.

    Monday 27 September 2010

    12:13 GDTPermanent link to #Hot tweets: September 2010# Hot tweets: September 2010 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for the month of September 2010. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

    ,
    12:13 GDTPermanent link to #Hot tweets: September 2010# Hot tweets: September 2010 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for the month of September 2010. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

    ,
    12:13 GDTPermanent link to #Hot tweets: September 2010# Hot tweets: September 2010 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for the month of September 2010. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.


    Monday 27 September 2010

    12:29 GDTPermanent link to #Sal Khan is Bill Gates Sal Khan is Bill Gates' favorite teacher - Comments (0)

    I find it amazing and inspiring what some people manage to achieve almost by accident. They start out simply helping someone, doing what they love and it mushrooms into something much bigger without their really planning it. There is a lot of power in following your passion :-)

    Take a look at Seth Kahn and his Kahn Academy or watch this PBS NewsHour video on the Khan Academy and Salman Khan .

    A fascinating story. I wonder what in initiatives like this mean for the future of education?
    ,
    12:29 GDTPermanent link to #Sal Khan is Bill Gates Sal Khan is Bill Gates' favorite teacher - Comments (0)

    I find it amazing and inspiring what some people manage to achieve almost by accident. They start out simply helping someone, doing what they love and it mushrooms into something much bigger without their really planning it. There is a lot of power in following your passion :-)

    Take a look at Seth Kahn and his Kahn Academy or watch this PBS NewsHour video on the Khan Academy and Salman Khan .

    A fascinating story. I wonder what in initiatives like this mean for the future of education?
    ,
    12:29 GDTPermanent link to #Sal Khan is Bill Gates Sal Khan is Bill Gates' favorite teacher - Comments (0)

    I find it amazing and inspiring what some people manage to achieve almost by accident. They start out simply helping someone, doing what they love and it mushrooms into something much bigger without their really planning it. There is a lot of power in following your passion :-)

    Take a look at Seth Kahn and his Kahn Academy or watch this PBS NewsHour video on the Khan Academy and Salman Khan .

    A fascinating story. I wonder what in initiatives like this mean for the future of education?
    ,
    12:29 GDTPermanent link to #Sal Khan is Bill Gates Sal Khan is Bill Gates' favorite teacher - Comments (0)

    I find it amazing and inspiring what some people manage to achieve almost by accident. They start out simply helping someone, doing what they love and it mushrooms into something much bigger without their really planning it. There is a lot of power in following your passion :-)

    Take a look at Seth Kahn and his Kahn Academy or watch this PBS NewsHour video on the Khan Academy and Salman Khan .

    A fascinating story. I wonder what in initiatives like this mean for the future of education?

    Sunday 22 August 2010

    18:39 GDTPermanent link to #Travel update for 2010# Travel update for 2010 - Comments (0)

    I am about to enter a busy travel period between now and the end of the year, including what is starting to become an annual event: five weeks in Singapore, Australia and New Zealand-Singapore.
    If you would like to meet with me, get in touch!

    Sunday 22 August 2010

    14:44 GDTPermanent link to #Don Don't Call Me a Guru, Dammit! - Comments (0)

    I occasionally get called a "KM guru". I appreciate the compliment but I don't like the term and I don't like being labelled a guru. I usually laugh it off by objecting that I am not a "Kangaroo". Say KM guru fast enough and it sounds like KM guru. LOL.

    Given this, I rather liked this blog post by Rick Ladd Dont Call Me a Guru and Peter Drucker's observation that the only reason people called him a guru was that they did not know how to spell the word "charlatan".

    Oh and one other pet peeve. If you call yourself an expert then you are most likely not one. To my mind only other people can bestow that honour on you. And even then, like the word guru, I am not so sure I like it. Both words smack of elitism and marketing hype.

    Sunday 22 August 2010

    12:04 GDTPermanent link to #Hot tweets: August 2010# Hot tweets: August 2010 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for the month of August 2010. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

    ,
    12:04 GDTPermanent link to #Hot tweets: August 2010# Hot tweets: August 2010 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for the month of August 2010. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.

    ,
    12:04 GDTPermanent link to #Hot tweets: August 2010# Hot tweets: August 2010 - Comments (0)

    Here are some of my more interesting Tweets for the month of August 2010. Take a look, if you are not a Tweeter, you will get a good idea of how I use it by browsing the list of micro-posts. And if you like what you see then subscribe to my Tweets.


    Sunday 22 August 2010

    11:35 GDTPermanent link to #More Knowledge Cafe conversations# More Knowledge Cafe conversations - Comments (0)

    I was talking with my friend David Pottinger the other day over a beer or two. David has attended a number of my London Knowledge Cafes, including the last one at Arup. He was particular interested in the conversations that took place before and after at the Arup event and had blogged about them.

    As we talked we came to realise that there were up to eight quite distinct phases of the Cafe were different types of conversation took place. This was something I had not seen before. Here are eight potential conversations:
    1. Conversation with a friend at a pre-Cafe meeting and on way to Cafe on the tube
    2. Conversation during the pre-Cafe networking session
    3. Speed networking conversation at the start of the Cafe
    4. Conversation in small groups as part of the Cafe
    5. Conversation in whole group as part of the Cafe
    6. Conversation during the networking session after the end of Cafe as people are leaving
    7. Conversation at a local pub after the Cafe
    8. Conversation on the tube or train on the way home
    Not everyone gets to experience all eight of these conversations but many do. I for one, often meet up with someone before the Cafe and travel with them to the venue. There is conversation down the pub and I frequently travel home to Fleet with David as we live in the same town and of course the conversation continues.

    That's a lot of conversations and each one is quite different. David's particular interest was the post-Cafe conversations as he felt this was the most interesting and productive phase. People are at their most relaxed and unfocused and thus the conversations often took an unexpected direction. People were also more likely to be themselves and not act out their job role.

    Quite a fascinating insight. Its got both me and David thinking about how the nature of all of these conversations might be improved.

    Friday 20 August 2010

    15:49 GDTPermanent link to #Update: Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Update: Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    I talked about the Gurteen Knowledge Group on LinkedIn recently and how I was making it the central discussion forum for the Gurteen Knowledge Community.

    Since then, over 120 people have registered and we are now up to 1,120 members or thereabouts. A few new discussions have started also.

    If you are not a member, you can find more information here and register. Please join-up and start to use the forum, as apart from Facebook, it is the best place to meet and have discussions with other members of the community.

    And if you would like to connect with me personally on LinkedIn please do so.
    ,
    15:49 GDTPermanent link to #Update: Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin# Update: Gurteen Knowledge Community Group on Linkedin - Comments (0)

    I talked about the Gurteen Knowledge Group on LinkedIn recently and how I was making it the central discussion forum for the Gurteen Knowledge Community.

    Since then, over 120 people have registered and we are now up to 1,120 members or thereabouts. A few new discussions have started also.

    If you are not a member, you can find more information here and register. Please join-up and start to use the forum, as apart from Facebook, it is the best place to meet and have discussions with other members of the community.

    And if you would like to connect with me personally on LinkedIn please do so.

    Friday 20 August 2010

    10:54 GDTPermanent link to #Academic Talk# Academic Talk - Comments (0)

    Dan Remenyi is a visiting professor at the School of Systems and Data Studies, Trinity College Dublin. He is also a good friend.

    Dan has created a new resource called Academic Talk on the Academic Conferences website. It is a collection of videos of talks that should be of interest to researchers. I find the one on "The Moral Side of Murder" by Michael Sandel of Harvard University quite fascinating. Go take a look!

    Dan also has an interesting blog on Research Methodology that he recently started.
    ,
    10:54 GDTPermanent link to #Academic Talk# Academic Talk - Comments (0)

    Dan Remenyi is a visiting professor at the School of Systems and Data Studies, Trinity College Dublin. He is also a good friend.

    Dan has created a new resource called Academic Talk on the Academic Conferences website. It is a collection of videos of talks that should be of interest to researchers. I find the one on "The Moral Side of Murder" by Michael Sandel of Harvard University quite fascinating. Go take a look!

    Dan also has an interesting blog on Research Methodology that he recently started.
    ,
    10:54 GDTPermanent link to #Academic Talk# Academic Talk - Comments (0)

    Dan Remenyi is a visiting professor at the School of Systems and Data Studies, Trinity College Dublin. He is also a good friend.

    Dan has created a new resource called Academic Talk on the Academic Conferences website. It is a collection of videos of talks that should be of interest to researchers. I find the one on "The Moral Side of Murder" by Michael Sandel of Harvard University quite fascinating. Go take a look!

    Dan also has an interesting blog on Research Methodology that he recently started.

    Friday 20 August 2010

    09:53 GDTPermanent link to #Dilbert pokes fun at Knowledge Management# Dilbert pokes fun at Knowledge Management - Comments (0)

    Everyone loves Dilbert. Over the years there have been some gems relating to knowledge management, collaboration, knowledge sharing and the like.

    So I thought I would start to dig them out and create a collection of Dilbert comic strips on KM that can be viewed through my media player. You may find a lot of other interesting stuff there too. Enjoy!

    Here is one of my favourites from 1998 no less!


    Dilbert on Knowledge Management

    Dilbert.com


    A 1998 Dilbert Comic Strip taking a poke at Knowledge Management. Unfortunately, that language "We must develop knowledge optimization initiatives to leverage our key leanings" is still only too common in KM circles.

    You can view more Dilbert comic strips on KM through my media player.

    Media Information: Image



    Thursday 19 August 2010

    11:13 GDTPermanent link to #No Kindle required# No Kindle required - Comments (0)

    I only recently realised that I did not need a Kindle to read Kindle books or magazines and that quite a few Kindle books where the copyright has expired are free.

    You can currently download free Kindle readers for the iPhone, Android smartphones, the iPad or your PC or Mac. There are probably other devices but try as I may, I can't find a definitive list.

    I have downloaded Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience for now to see how I get on reading a book on my iPhone. So far, despite the small screen size, I am finding it easy going .

    But do I buy a Kindle? At just over £100 its not a big decision but I still like traditional books. Amazon would make the transition so much easier if their ebooks were only a few pounds each but every time I have toyed with buying an ebook it is only slightly cheaper than the paper version. Some are even dearer!

    "Buy a paper version - get the ebook free" would be cool. I'd even pay a few pounds extra to get the ebook thrown in. I hope its only a matter of time :-)

    So I will play at the fringes for now until something tips me to go electronic. It may be articles like this: 5 Ways That eBooks Are Better Than Paper Books.

    Or maybe I will go for the iPad - I can read Kindle books there too - as well as books from the Apple store: Kindle vs iPad Face-off.
    ,
    11:13 GDTPermanent link to #No Kindle required# No Kindle required - Comments (0)

    I only recently realised that I did not need a Kindle to read Kindle books or magazines and that quite a few Kindle books where the copyright has expired are free.

    You can currently download free Kindle readers for the iPhone, Android smartphones, the iPad or your PC or Mac. There are probably other devices but try as I may, I can't find a definitive list.

    I have downloaded Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience for now to see how I get on reading a book on my iPhone. So far, despite the small screen size, I am finding it easy going .

    But do I buy a Kindle? At just over £100 its not a big decision but I still like traditional books. Amazon would make the transition so much easier if their ebooks were only a few pounds each but every time I have toyed with buying an ebook it is only slightly cheaper than the paper version. Some are even dearer!

    "Buy a paper version - get the ebook free" would be cool. I'd even pay a few pounds extra to get the ebook thrown in. I hope its only a matter of time :-)

    So I will play at the fringes for now until something tips me to go electronic. It may be articles like this: 5 Ways That eBooks Are Better Than Paper Books.

    Or maybe I will go for the iPad - I can read Kindle books there too - as well as books from the Apple store: Kindle vs iPad Face-off.
    ,
    11:13 GDTPermanent link to #No Kindle required# No Kindle required - Comments (0)

    I only recently realised that I did not need a Kindle to read Kindle books or magazines and that quite a few Kindle books where the copyright has expired are free.

    You can currently download free Kindle readers for the iPhone, Android smartphones, the iPad or your PC or Mac. There are probably other devices but try as I may, I can't find a definitive list.

    I have downloaded Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience for now to see how I get on reading a book on my iPhone. So far, despite the small screen size, I am finding it easy going .

    But do I buy a Kindle? At just over £100 its not a big decision but I still like traditional books. Amazon would make the transition so much easier if their ebooks were only a few pounds each but every time I have toyed with buying an ebook it is only slightly cheaper than the paper version. Some are even dearer!

    "Buy a paper version - get the ebook free" would be cool. I'd even pay a few pounds extra to get the ebook thrown in. I hope its only a matter of time :-)

    So I will play at the fringes for now until something tips me to go electronic. It may be articles like this: 5 Ways That eBooks Are Better Than Paper Books.

    Or maybe I will go for the iPad - I can read Kindle books there too - as well as books from the Apple store: Kindle vs iPad Face-off.
    ,
    11:13 GDTPermanent link to #No Kindle required# No Kindle required - Comments (0)

    I only recently realised that I did not need a Kindle to read Kindle books or magazines and that quite a few Kindle books where the copyright has expired are free.

    You can currently download free Kindle readers for the iPhone, Android smartphones, the iPad or your PC or Mac. There are probably other devices but try as I may, I can't find a definitive list.

    I have downloaded Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience for now to see how I get on reading a book on my iPhone. So far, despite the small screen size, I am finding it easy going .

    But do I buy a Kindle? At just over £100 its not a big decision but I still like traditional books. Amazon would make the transition so much easier if their ebooks were only a few pounds each but every time I have toyed with buying an ebook it is only slightly cheaper than the paper version. Some are even dearer!

    "Buy a paper version - get the ebook free" would be cool. I'd even pay a few pounds extra to get the ebook thrown in. I hope its only a matter of time :-)

    So I will play at the fringes for now until something tips me to go electronic. It may be articles like this: 5 Ways That eBooks Are Better Than Paper Books.

    Or maybe I will go for the iPad - I can read Kindle books there too - as well as books from the Apple store: Kindle vs iPad Face-off.

    Wednesday 18 August 2010

    18:32 GDTPermanent link to #Knoco KM Newsletter# Knoco KM Newsletter - Comments (0)

    I am starting to build a new section of my site dedicated to newsletters on KM and related subjects. I only have three or four newsletters at present and have yet to create the section page but here is one of the KM newsletters for you to be going on with. Its from Nick Milton and Tom Young of Knoco.

    Please let me know if you are aware of any other publications.

    Nick and Tom have a YouTube channel with over 40 KM videos that you may also find of interest.
    ,
    18:32 GDTPermanent link to #Knoco KM Newsletter# Knoco KM Newsletter - Comments (0)

    I am starting to build a new section of my site dedicated to newsletters on KM and related subjects. I only have three or four newsletters at present and have yet to create the section page but here is one of the KM newsletters for you to be going on with. Its from Nick Milton and Tom Young of Knoco.

    Please let me know if you are aware of any other publications.

    Nick and Tom have a YouTube channel with over 40 KM videos that you may also find of interest.

    Wednesday 18 August 2010

    12:30 GDTPermanent link to #Are many conversations pointless and does technology discourage face to face interaction?# Are many conversations pointless and does technology discourage face to face interaction? - Comments (0)

    I recently came across this article on conversation: Pub is hub of conversation